How to find what software has been automatically updated on your Mac

In a recent article, we looked at how you get software updates on your Mac. You get updates in three ways. If you bought apps from the Mac App Store, that app provides updates. If you bought apps directly from developers, they apps generally use their own update system; occasionally you may need to download an update from a developer’s website. And for macOS updates and security updates, it’s the Software Update preference pane that manages these updates.

Some people prefer to update their apps and Macs manually: they check the Mac App Store or the Software Update preference pane to see when updates are available, or they react when their Macs present notifications. Others prefer to let all this occur automatically. In the latter case, you may not even notice many of the updates: they can happen in the background, though you do need to restart your Mac for major operating system and security updates. And your Mac can automatically, and silently, install “system data files and security updates” in the background without telling you.

There’s no easy way to find what has been updated, especially if updates have been made automatically in the background. You can check the Mac App Store’s Updates section to see which apps have been updated, but it only shows the most recent updates; and there’s no log for system updates. In this article, I’ll tell you how you can see a list of everything that’s been updated, automatically or manually, on your Mac via the Mac App Store and Software Update.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #137: Apple operating system updates, iPhone & iPad storage, and shooting video on an iPhone

Apple updated all its operating systems again this week, but a jailbreak vulnerability was found quickly. We discuss the new contact tracing feature in iOS, how to free up storage on an iOS device, and give some tips on shooting video on an iPhone.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The Next Track, Episode #184 – TJ Connelly, Boston Sports DJ

TJ Connelly is a sports DJ: he provides “scores” for live sporting events, such as baseball, football, and hockey games. Since the lockdown, he’s been out of work, and he has been focusing his attention on Uncertain Times, a daily streaming radio show. We talk with him about what it means to score live sports, and how his streaming show is reconnecting him with real radio.

Help support The Next Track by making regular donations via Patreon. We’re ad-free and self-sustaining so your support is what keeps us going. Thanks!

Support The Next Track.

Find out more at The Next Track website, or follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast.

The Zen of Everything Podcast, Episode 26: Zen Books

“Zen is a special transmission outside the scriptures, not depending on words and letters.” With that in mind, Jundo and Kirk discuss Zen books: how to read them, what to read, and when to burn them.

Find out more at the Zen of Everything website and at Treeleaf Zendo.

Photos makes it very difficult to find RAW+JPEG photos – The Robservatory

Unfortunately, I wasn’t so smart in the past, and I imported many RAW and RAW+JPEG photos to Photos—and I don’t need the RAW versions at all. Some are pure RAW, and these I can easily find and fix (export, convert to JPEG, re-import). Unfortunately, most are in the RAW+JPEG format, and that’s a problem: Once such photos are in Photos, there’s absolutely no way to find them—which means there’s no easy way to remove them.

My friend Rob wants to get rid of raw files in his Apple Phots library, and this isn’t easy. I’m surprised that it’s so hard to find raw files; as he explains, when you use a jpeg + raw pair of photos, the Photos app only “sees” the one you’ve chosen to edit.

He found a sort-of solution to his problem, but one that won’t work for most people. I’d love an option to remove the photo that isn’t selected for editing in Photos.

Source: Photos makes it very difficult to find RAW+JPEG photos | The Robservatory

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 68: Revisiting Geotagging with HoudahGeo 6.0

With photographers finding themselves with unexpected time on their hands at home, it’s a great time to update the location data in the photos in your library. Pierre Bernard joins us again to talk about the new features in his Mac app HoudahGeo 6.0, indulging our lazy photographic habits, and… how HoudahGeo supports scuba divers?

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

How to Shoot Video with an iPhone

Shooting video with an iPhone is easy, but you may not know all the many options available on your device. You can choose the resolution and frame rate of your videos, shoot slow motion or time-lapse videos, and you can zoom and use the different lenses on your iPhone, if your model has multiple cameras.

But you can also take stills while you’re shooting video, and with third-party video apps, you have tight control over focus and exposure, making the iPhone good enough to shoot a feature film. (And it’s been done.)

In this article, I’m going to explain the many options available on an iPhone for shooting video. (And note that most of what I describe also applies to the iPad.)

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #136: Tips for using your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch

We look at some practical tips for getting more out of your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch. We take a close look at System Preferences, discuss using the iPad as a second screen for your Mac; and a handful of tips for making the Apple Watch more efficient. Also, Josh and Kirk disagree about Microsoft’s choice to flag two spaces after a period in Word as an error.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The Next Track, Episode #183 – Composer and Pianist Timo Andres on Concertizing at Home

Timo Andres is a young composer and pianist, nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 2016. We discuss his music, and how he missed his first solo recital at Carnegie Hall du to the coronavirus lockdown, and decided to make home videos of all the works to present his program to the public. (Apologies for the audio; we made some mistakes when recording.)

Help support The Next Track by making regular donations via Patreon. We’re ad-free and self-sustaining so your support is what keeps us going. Thanks!

Support The Next Track.

Find out more at The Next Track website, or follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast.