5 Safari Plug-Ins that Make Browsing Better

One thing I hate when I’m browsing the web is being distracted. I hate those blinking, moving ads, auto-play videos, and all the other cruft that websites use to try to get you to click, click, click somewhere, rather than read the article that attracted you in the first place.

Fortunately, there are ways to avoid the most egregious annoyances on the web. Some of them can be easily muted using browser plug-ins, like the five that I use with Safari to make my browsing experience a lot better. (Note: some of these plug-ins also have equivalents for other browsers, such as Firefox and Chrome.)

Read the rest of the article on Macworld.

14 thoughts on “5 Safari Plug-Ins that Make Browsing Better

  1. Defacer: removes Facebook buttons from sites.
    Detox: Automatically expands shortened t.co links on Twitter
    ⌘-Click Avenger: Stops sites from Javascript-disabling open-in-new-tab clicks.
    LinkThing: enhances your control over how links on web pages are opened
    Ghostery: eliminate web bugs/tracking

  2. Defacer: removes Facebook buttons from sites.
    Detox: Automatically expands shortened t.co links on Twitter
    ⌘-Click Avenger: Stops sites from Javascript-disabling open-in-new-tab clicks.
    LinkThing: enhances your control over how links on web pages are opened
    Ghostery: eliminate web bugs/tracking

  3. Always good to lean of a few more tweaks to help keep my surfing safer, Kirk. One question and an observation though: I’m curious as to your opinion of AdBlock Plus, as opposed to the 87-octane AdBlock.

    Also, as was mentioned as a comment by Chip, are you not familiar with Ghostery? If not for that particular plugin I’d have to contend with the Brightcove video plugin and animation so prevalent on the Macworld site (among other trackers there).

    • I’ve always been happy with the standard AdBlock; I don’t think I’ve ever tried AdBlock Plus. I used to use GlimmerBlocker, which is a system-wide ad blocker, which is great because it blocks ads in my RSS reader, but it’s not happy with Yosemite.

      As for Ghostery, I have used it, but it’s too problematic. I found that, on many sites, it blocked things like comments and certain parts of the content.

      • Interestingly, it’s that facet of Ghostery which, for me, is a feature more like ClickToPlugin or ClickToFlash in that I get a graphical hint or indicator of whether or not to allow additional/conditional content. Just as it (Ghostery) lets me know what dominant tracker it’s blocking (on Macworld.com the main perpetrator is Brightcove video player, on others it may be a comments section), it affords me the choice of temporarily permitting them for viewing.

        I’d used GlimmerBlocker for years with SnowLeopard but wound up uninstalling it after seeing its title come up in too many hang reports. No doubt it may have been coincidental or attributable to my own naivety as to its’ settings. I’m on Mavericks and have not visited it since.

        • Yup. In Ghostery’s settings it’s extremely simply to uncheck/whitelist ‘widgets’ like video players, audio players, and commenting systems. But it kills off hundreds upon hundreds of different web beacons that infest websites and emails and build multi-site, multi-platform dossiers on you. And that makes it invaluable.

      • Are you using the latest Glimmerblocker (1.6.5)? He fixed a couple of things and it works pretty well for me on 10.10.

  4. Always good to lean of a few more tweaks to help keep my surfing safer, Kirk. One question and an observation though: I’m curious as to your opinion of AdBlock Plus, as opposed to the 87-octane AdBlock.

    Also, as was mentioned as a comment by Chip, are you not familiar with Ghostery? If not for that particular plugin I’d have to contend with the Brightcove video plugin and animation so prevalent on the Macworld site (among other trackers there).

    • I’ve always been happy with the standard AdBlock; I don’t think I’ve ever tried AdBlock Plus. I used to use GlimmerBlocker, which is a system-wide ad blocker, which is great because it blocks ads in my RSS reader, but it’s not happy with Yosemite.

      As for Ghostery, I have used it, but it’s too problematic. I found that, on many sites, it blocked things like comments and certain parts of the content.

      • Interestingly, it’s that facet of Ghostery which, for me, is a feature more like ClickToPlugin or ClickToFlash in that I get a graphical hint or indicator of whether or not to allow additional/conditional content. Just as it (Ghostery) lets me know what dominant tracker it’s blocking (on Macworld.com the main perpetrator is Brightcove video player, on others it may be a comments section), it affords me the choice of temporarily permitting them for viewing.

        I’d used GlimmerBlocker for years with SnowLeopard but wound up uninstalling it after seeing its title come up in too many hang reports. No doubt it may have been coincidental or attributable to my own naivety as to its’ settings. I’m on Mavericks and have not visited it since.

        • Yup. In Ghostery’s settings it’s extremely simply to uncheck/whitelist ‘widgets’ like video players, audio players, and commenting systems. But it kills off hundreds upon hundreds of different web beacons that infest websites and emails and build multi-site, multi-platform dossiers on you. And that makes it invaluable.

      • Are you using the latest Glimmerblocker (1.6.5)? He fixed a couple of things and it works pretty well for me on 10.10.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.