A Bibliophile’s Defense of Physical Books | The New Republic

“You scroll and swipe and click your way through your life, scanning screens for information and interruption, screens that force you into a want of rapidity. Why you’d welcome another screen in your life, another enticement to rapidity and diversion, is a question you might ask yourself.”

Source: A Bibliophile’s Defense of Physical Books | The New Republic

Every now and then, I tell myself that I should buy fewer books, and more ebooks. My Kindle currently has about 100 unread books on it, most books that I know I’ll only want to read once. But when there’s a book I want, I first think of buying the physical book, before checking to see if it’s cheap enough in its Kindle version to buy the inferior edition.

2 thoughts on “A Bibliophile’s Defense of Physical Books | The New Republic

  1. Like yours, my Kindle Paperwhite has multiple dozens of unread books on it. Add to that Amazon’s wonderful feature “Send To Kindle”, which in my case offers the option of copying/pasting web articles into rtf files, which in turn can be loaded onto my reading device.

    Among daily emails from reputable sources are opportunities to peruse and purchase discounted ebooks, which I take advantage of on an average 1-2 a month. One very interesting observation of this recent market for the consumption of ebooks is their lack of what I call competitive pricing. Oh sure, they’re usually priced at or a few percentage points below average discounted charges (using Amazon as a main source), but are by no means “cheap” or what I would consider aggressively priced. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that even a fair condition title of the same name in physical form may be had for less than $5, shipping included (also from Amazon).

    I must confess however that despite being quadruple the price of their used siblings, nothing comes close to the portability of an ebook, unless it’s one with graphs, maps or illustrations.

  2. Like yours, my Kindle Paperwhite has multiple dozens of unread books on it. Add to that Amazon’s wonderful feature “Send To Kindle”, which in my case offers the option of copying/pasting web articles into rtf files, which in turn can be loaded onto my reading device.

    Among daily emails from reputable sources are opportunities to peruse and purchase discounted ebooks, which I take advantage of on an average 1-2 a month. One very interesting observation of this recent market for the consumption of ebooks is their lack of what I call competitive pricing. Oh sure, they’re usually priced at or a few percentage points below average discounted charges (using Amazon as a main source), but are by no means “cheap” or what I would consider aggressively priced. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that even a fair condition title of the same name in physical form may be had for less than $5, shipping included (also from Amazon).

    I must confess however that despite being quadruple the price of their used siblings, nothing comes close to the portability of an ebook, unless it’s one with graphs, maps or illustrations.

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