A Conversation With Brian Eno About Ambient Music – Pitchfork

I really think that for us, who all grew up listening primarily to recorded music, we tend to forget that until about 120 years ago ephemeral experience was the only one people had. I remember reading about a huge fan of Beethoven who lived to the age of 86 [in the era before recordings], and the great triumph of his life was that he’d managed to hear the Fifth Symphony six times. That’s pretty amazing. They would have been spread over many years, so there would have been no way of reliably comparing those performances.

All of our musical experience is based on the possibility of repetition, and of portability, so you can move music around to where you want to be, and scrutiny, because repetition allows scrutiny. You can go into something and hear it again and again. That’s really produced quite a different attitude to what is allowable in music. I always say that modern jazz wouldn’t have existed without recording, because to make improvisations sound sensible, you need to hear them again and again, so that all those little details that sound a bit random at first start to fit. You anticipate them and they seem right after a while. So in a way, the apps and the generative music are borrowing from all of the technology that has evolved in connection with recorded music and making a new kind of live, ephemeral, unfixable music. It’s a quite interesting historical moment.

A fascinating interview about ambient music and more.

Source: A Conversation With Brian Eno About Ambient Music | Pitchfork

2 thoughts on “A Conversation With Brian Eno About Ambient Music – Pitchfork

  1. I really liked his response to a question about what ambient music is. He compares narrative, structural music to ambient in the same way that representational painting is compared to abstract expressionism. How the eye (and ear) are lead in specific directions in one form, but must explore freely in the other because no direction is set. Best definition of ambient music I’ve ever read.

  2. I really liked his response to a question about what ambient music is. He compares narrative, structural music to ambient in the same way that representational painting is compared to abstract expressionism. How the eye (and ear) are lead in specific directions in one form, but must explore freely in the other because no direction is set. Best definition of ambient music I’ve ever read.

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