Amazing New Inexpensive Audiophile Device Improves the Quality of All Speakers

A friend sent me a picture of his new Mackie studio monitors, together with an amazing new device that greatly improves their sound quality. I don’t know why I didn’t think of this before.

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The specific gravity of the beans dampens parasite waves that can affect the linear flow of electrons in the cables, ensuring real-time optimization of the sound.

16 thoughts on “Amazing New Inexpensive Audiophile Device Improves the Quality of All Speakers

  1. Joking aside Heinz have been working with Linn at their research facility in Pittsburg on placing bean cans around the room in order to boost low frequencies and overall clarity. Sound waves can be transmitted through the sides of the bean cans as both longitudinal waves and transverse waves. Longitudinal sound waves are waves of alternating pressure deviations from the equilibrium pressure, causing local regions of compression and rarefaction, while transverse waves (in solids) are waves of alternating shear stress at right angle to the direction of propagation (an average Heinz bean tin contains over 150 beans plus sauce). Additionally, sound waves may be viewed simply by parabolic mirrors and objects that produce sound.
    I have tried placing tins around the room next to my speakers and I can definitely tell a pronounced difference, the recent last recording by Claudio Abbado of Brucker 9 in 24bit sounds stunning. The velocity vector of a Heinz bean tin is 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz, or put more simply: K = elastic bulk modulus, c = velocity of sound, and {\rho}\, = bean density
    Last month I read a paper published by The International Electrotechnical Commission which stated they were clear links to bean tin placement next to speakers and improvements with the Alexander Technique, this is why Heinz are taking more and more advertisements out in Audiophile magazines globally, this months What Hifi has a double page spread by Heinz which I will try and scan and add later.

  2. Joking aside Heinz have been working with Linn at their research facility in Pittsburg on placing bean cans around the room in order to boost low frequencies and overall clarity. Sound waves can be transmitted through the sides of the bean cans as both longitudinal waves and transverse waves. Longitudinal sound waves are waves of alternating pressure deviations from the equilibrium pressure, causing local regions of compression and rarefaction, while transverse waves (in solids) are waves of alternating shear stress at right angle to the direction of propagation (an average Heinz bean tin contains over 150 beans plus sauce). Additionally, sound waves may be viewed simply by parabolic mirrors and objects that produce sound.
    I have tried placing tins around the room next to my speakers and I can definitely tell a pronounced difference, the recent last recording by Claudio Abbado of Brucker 9 in 24bit sounds stunning. The velocity vector of a Heinz bean tin is 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz, or put more simply: K = elastic bulk modulus, c = velocity of sound, and {\rho}\, = bean density
    Last month I read a paper published by The International Electrotechnical Commission which stated they were clear links to bean tin placement next to speakers and improvements with the Alexander Technique, this is why Heinz are taking more and more advertisements out in Audiophile magazines globally, this months What Hifi has a double page spread by Heinz which I will try and scan and add later.

  3. I look forward to Kirk McElhearn publishing the results of a blind A-B-C-D comparison of Heinz and Tesco products, both traditional and low salt and sugar varieties.

  4. I look forward to Kirk McElhearn publishing the results of a blind A-B-C-D comparison of Heinz and Tesco products, both traditional and low salt and sugar varieties.

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