An Audiophile Switches From iOS to Android – Computer Audiophile

Note: I originally started this piece as an in-depth look at Android for audiophiles. I wanted to do the research and educate people so they didn’t have to spend their time combing the entire Internet. I figured the article would be a great resource for getting the best sound out of an Android device. After several days of research, talking to experts, even talking to Google, this article turned in a little different direction. There are major problems with Android audio. I ran into them. I tried to provide details and some workarounds, amid my frustration.

Chris Connaker, who runs the Computer Audiophile website, and who has been a guest on The Next Track several times, decided he wanted to try an Android phone. He chose what seems to be the best available model: the Google Pixel. The problems he encountered trying to play music are astounding. It’s not just that he couldn’t play high-resolution music, but he found that the phone doesn’t even have a hardware volume control switch.

I feel sorry for Android users who expect to be able to do more than the basics. Chris knows a lot about audio, and this should have been easy. It’s a tale of woe.

Source: Computer Audiophile – An Audiophile Switches From iOS to Android

10 thoughts on “An Audiophile Switches From iOS to Android – Computer Audiophile

  1. There is a reason why most “Android Ready” headphones and earbuds only have a one-button in-line remote. There are few manufacturers, like Sennheiser, who release three-button Android versions of their headphones, but the hardware support is very limited to only a handful of smartphones.

    I don’t get why Google, to this day, hasn’t figured that problem out.

  2. There is a reason why most “Android Ready” headphones and earbuds only have a one-button in-line remote. There are few manufacturers, like Sennheiser, who release three-button Android versions of their headphones, but the hardware support is very limited to only a handful of smartphones.

    I don’t get why Google, to this day, hasn’t figured that problem out.

  3. Kirk this was very informative and helpful. Music is the main reason i stay within the Apple architecture for my devices. I have been disappointed of late with products from them – this article lets me know there are issues with other manufacturers as well.

  4. Kirk this was very informative and helpful. Music is the main reason i stay within the Apple architecture for my devices. I have been disappointed of late with products from them – this article lets me know there are issues with other manufacturers as well.

  5. I wasn’t familiar with this particular Android audio disaster, but it doesn’t surprise me given the total lack of Android support for low-latency audio APIs. iOS does support these via CoreAudio, and that’s why there is a robust market in music creation apps and hardware interfaces for iOS and almost none for Android. It seems clear that Google simply doesn’t care about music.

  6. I wasn’t familiar with this particular Android audio disaster, but it doesn’t surprise me given the total lack of Android support for low-latency audio APIs. iOS does support these via CoreAudio, and that’s why there is a robust market in music creation apps and hardware interfaces for iOS and almost none for Android. It seems clear that Google simply doesn’t care about music.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.