Apple Forces Overcast App Developer to Remove Links to Other Podcast Apps

I’ve been using Overcast to listen to podcasts on my iPhone since it was released. It’s a great app, with some really good features. (Read my review.)

And developer Marco Arment did something nice in the app: he had links to other podcast apps in the Settings screen. So if you didn’t like Overcast, you could check out one of a half-dozen other apps. And the links appeared in random order, so none of the apps was always first in the list.

There was an update today to Overcast, and, surprisingly, Apple forced Arment to remove those links to other apps:

Screen Shot 2015 01 18 at 1 40 39 PM

This is surprising. I don’t see why Apple would not allow a developer to link to other apps; I’m pretty sure I’ve seen apps that try and get you to buy other apps by the same developer. The only difference here is that Arment was helping you find the best podcast app for you by sharing links to apps that aren’t his.

Sigh. More oddity from Apple’s app approval team…

Update: It turns out that Arment broke rule 2.25 of the App Store Review Guidelines, which says:

“Apps that display Apps other than your own for purchase or promotion in a manner similar to or confusing with the App Store will be rejected.”

It’s surprising that the app was accepted in the past, through several updates, with this feature. Again, this underscores the arbitrary nature of the App Store review process.

4 thoughts on “Apple Forces Overcast App Developer to Remove Links to Other Podcast Apps

  1. Their store their rules. Same kind of thing happened to us. We posted a game that is a little edgy in subject matter and it was accepted. Later submission to add additional functionality (no change to the edgy theme or gameplay. added music, single player) resulted in removal of the pre-approved app without warning. Its getting hard to take them serious every time something like this happens. I get the feeling they are making this up as they go. He had a critical article out on a popular podcast (ATP) and I can’t help but wonder if this is a ‘don’t be critical of us or else’ move on the Apple review team. It’s NOT an open platform as people might hope. Your ok as long as you are not edgy or say something critical (deserving or not IMHO.) Developers are gonna start losing interest or just explore other avenues to see how different the bad grass tastes on the other side (its grown with different bull!@#$ so far.) I know I have gone to great lengths now to see what it’s like on the other platforms of consequence… They probably wont pay as much, but I wont feel censored either.

  2. Their store their rules. Same kind of thing happened to us. We posted a game that is a little edgy in subject matter and it was accepted. Later submission to add additional functionality (no change to the edgy theme or gameplay. added music, single player) resulted in removal of the pre-approved app without warning. Its getting hard to take them serious every time something like this happens. I get the feeling they are making this up as they go. He had a critical article out on a popular podcast (ATP) and I can’t help but wonder if this is a ‘don’t be critical of us or else’ move on the Apple review team. It’s NOT an open platform as people might hope. Your ok as long as you are not edgy or say something critical (deserving or not IMHO.) Developers are gonna start losing interest or just explore other avenues to see how different the bad grass tastes on the other side (its grown with different bull!@#$ so far.) I know I have gone to great lengths now to see what it’s like on the other platforms of consequence… They probably wont pay as much, but I wont feel censored either.

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