Apple HomePod Review: Superior Sound, but Limited by Siri

Apple’s HomePod has finally shipped, boasting a $350 price tag and marking the company’s foray into the “smart speaker” sector with a device that is more speaker than smart. This small, sleek device, clearly a product of Apple’s design team, is meant to offer high-quality sound and serve as a gateway to Siri, Apple’s personal assistant. In spite of the high price, it’s a very nice device, but it has a lot of weaknesses.

Should you buy a HomePod? Is it worth the price? Read on for our full review of Apple’s HomePod speaker to help you decide if it’s worth buying for your home.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog

4 thoughts on “Apple HomePod Review: Superior Sound, but Limited by Siri

  1. Another expensive Apple device that requires another Apple device to operate as designed. Something like this should be stand alone, able to access whatever music service the buyer chooses. Not interested.

  2. Another expensive Apple device that requires another Apple device to operate as designed. Something like this should be stand alone, able to access whatever music service the buyer chooses. Not interested.

  3. Bob S. This blog is essentially run by a guy who most of the time embraces Apple. He and I are probably thankful that for the majority of our computing live’s Apple has offered an alternative to the ‘Windows’ world. He rightly criticises them when it’s due and of course we all know Apple does do some odd things.

    Your right, Apple does generally charge premium prices for all it’s products. All those that I have ever purchased have mostly lasted beyond what might be termed ‘normal’ replacement periods, say, around 7 years. They’ve provided excellent service and a fantastic user experience. I could go into details of the dates and numerous purchases but suffice to say I am still using a MacBook Pro bought in 2011 which runs the latest OS and has never had any major issues. It even uses it’s original battery.

    I have no doubt that only real fans will want a HomePod but it will sell steadily. As it is a ‘speaker’ of course it requires another (Apple) device to provide a ‘source’ to play through it, but then so do similarly priced quality speakers, I’m thinking the kind made by Sonos. The cheaper standalone ones rely on using Amazon or Google services (their source) and basically are subsidised by the sales that those companies hope you will make using their products and services.

    Your comments sound a little like a bit of Apple-bashing and that you possibly don’t know Apple products very well. Your wrong about Apple devices needing other Apple devices to operate. There will be elements of their features that will be restricted but the iPhone is a standalone device, as is an iPad, iPod touch and latest Apple Watch. Don’t any other manufacturers hope that you will buy into their ecosystem, Apple aren’t alone and theirs works seamlessly with out advertising or serious privacy issues.

  4. Bob S. This blog is essentially run by a guy who most of the time embraces Apple. He and I are probably thankful that for the majority of our computing live’s Apple has offered an alternative to the ‘Windows’ world. He rightly criticises them when it’s due and of course we all know Apple does do some odd things.

    Your right, Apple does generally charge premium prices for all it’s products. All those that I have ever purchased have mostly lasted beyond what might be termed ‘normal’ replacement periods, say, around 7 years. They’ve provided excellent service and a fantastic user experience. I could go into details of the dates and numerous purchases but suffice to say I am still using a MacBook Pro bought in 2011 which runs the latest OS and has never had any major issues. It even uses it’s original battery.

    I have no doubt that only real fans will want a HomePod but it will sell steadily. As it is a ‘speaker’ of course it requires another (Apple) device to provide a ‘source’ to play through it, but then so do similarly priced quality speakers, I’m thinking the kind made by Sonos. The cheaper standalone ones rely on using Amazon or Google services (their source) and basically are subsidised by the sales that those companies hope you will make using their products and services.

    Your comments sound a little like a bit of Apple-bashing and that you possibly don’t know Apple products very well. Your wrong about Apple devices needing other Apple devices to operate. There will be elements of their features that will be restricted but the iPhone is a standalone device, as is an iPad, iPod touch and latest Apple Watch. Don’t any other manufacturers hope that you will buy into their ecosystem, Apple aren’t alone and theirs works seamlessly with out advertising or serious privacy issues.

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