Apple Music: a Close Look at How it Works

Apple announced Apple Music yesterday. This new service combines a music streaming service with discovery features, curated playlists, and radio, and also includes a sort-of-social network for music. (Remember Ping?) Apple’s presentation of Apple Music was very confused and confusing, and was marred by uninspired presenters, suggesting that the company really hadn’t spent much time planning the presentation.

As of today, all we know about Apple Music is what’s on the surface. Here’s what Apple Music offers:

Music Streaming

Apple Music will be a music streaming service, like Spotify, Deezer, or even Tidal (without the lossless option that latter service offers). Presumably, Apple Music will stream at 256 kbps, but Apple has not said anything about quality. Apple claims that you can listen to “the tens of millions of tracks in the Apple Music library.” I note that they did not say “all the music available on the iTunes Store,” which suggests that labels may be allowed to opt out.

But Apple says:

Apple music1

This suggests that Apple Music will work as I suggested in this article. I suggested that Apple would integrate streaming tracks into your library, allowing you to make playlists with tracks you own and tracks you rent. This seems to fit with what Apple says on their website:

Wherever your music comes from — purchased in the iTunes Store, ripped from a rare import CD, or downloaded from your favorite music blog — everything you’ve collected lives in one place. And alongside it is the ever-expanding Apple Music library. It’s like having just about every song ever recorded at your fingertips.

And this:

As an Apple Music member you can add anything from the Apple Music library — a song, an album, or a video — to your collection. And that’s just the warm-up act. From there you can create the perfect playlist from anything you’ve added. You can save it for offline listening and take it on the road.

Apple Music will be available through iOS devices, Macs or PCs using iTunes, the Apple Watch, and even Android, with an app for that platform available in the fall. And Apple Music is clearly designed for those users who already have an iTunes library. If you’re a Spotify user, and only listen to music through that service, there’s little incentive to switch. But if you do have music in your iTunes library, then Apple Music, by allowing you to combine your existing library and streamed tracks, makes it much easier to use what you already own.

Discovery

The world has changed a lot since friends would get together and listen to records. Now it’s all about sharing music on Facebook and Twitter, or sending YouTube links to people to turn them on to new music. “Discovery” is a big buzz-word in the music business; people can’t discover music on their own, they need a music service to do it for them.

As such, Apple Music includes For You, a section of the Music app on iOS, and of iTunes, that recommends music. Apple claims this is done by humans, but they simply can’t have enough humans who know enough music to do this.

I think much of this “discovery” is powered by Genius, which I’ve found works fairly well, at least to make playlists from my library. Apple has had years to tweak Genius, and adding it to Apple Music makes sense.

Apple claims that they hone their recommendations over time:

When we make recommendations, we consider what you tell us you like. Whether you love a song or not, your feedback helps our suggestions get better and better. But we also pay attention to what you actually play. So if you’re an EDM fan with a secret affinity for big band music, we’ll find you more stuff that swings. And drops the beat.

There will also be lots of playlists: genre playlists, “mood” playlists, “handcrafted playlists,” and more. This could work; or, for more eclectic tastes, it might not.

Apple Music and iTunes Match

As Apple says:

Your entire library lives in iCloud when you’re an Apple Music member. First, we identify all the tracks in your personal collection and compare them to the Apple Music library to see if we have copies. If we do, we make them instantly available in iCloud across all your devices. If you have music that’s not in the Apple Music library, we upload those songs from iTunes on your Mac or PC. And because it’s all stored in iCloud, it won’t take up any space on your devices.

Apple Music is therefore an extension of iTunes Match, with one important difference: there does not seem to be any limit in the number of tracks you can have. This is huge; many music lovers have long been irked by the 25,000-track limit of iTunes Match. However, since Apple Music will undoubtedly stream music with DRM, the matched and streamed tracks will contain DRM. Again, we don’t know, but I assume that they will be 256 kbps files, so they’ll be the same quality as iTunes Match. But don’t delete your original files; you may want them later.

Radio

Apple Music includes Beats 1 Radio, or, as Apple says:

Beats 1 is a truly global listening experience. It broadcasts 24/7 to over 100 countries from our studios in Los Angeles, New York, and London. No matter where you are or when you tune in, you’ll hear the same great programming as every other listener. Enjoy exclusive interviews, guest hosts, and the best of what’s going on in the world of music.

It’s interesting to note several things here. First, this international radio station will be in English, at least at first. It may be broadcast to 100 countries, but it won’t have local content from those countries: no chanson fran├žaise, no K-Pop, no Afrobeat. This may change over time, but, to start with, it will be a lowest-common-denominator pop radio station. Sure, it’ll play the occasional eclectic track, but that won’t keep people listening; what most people want is the hits to have as wallpaper.

There will still be other radio stations, what is currently iTunes Radio. These algorithm-driven stations will work as before, but if you have an Apple Music subscription, you’ll be able to skip as many tracks as you want (compared with six tracks per station, per hour, currently).

Note that without an Apple Music subscription, you can still listen to these radio stations. iTunes Radio stations will be ad-supported for non-subscribers, and it’s not clear whether Beats 1 will have ads or not. And it’s worth noting that iTunes Radio doesn’t seem to be available in countries other than the US and Australia, where it is currently available, without a subscription.

Connect

As Apple says:

Connect is a place where musicians give their fans a closer look at their work, their inspirations, and their world. It’s a main line into the heart of music — great stuff straight from the artists.

Great stuff? A photo from some singer? A snarky comment from a musician? A short video from some band? Back in the day, Apple launched Ping, a music social network, which was supposed to do exactly the same thing. It was a massive failure, in part because it was a walled garden. You couldn’t share to or from Ping; you could only share within it.

If Connect is to work, it will be able to share to and from other social networks. And you can access Connect even if you’re not an Apple Music subscriber. This sort of thing is only successful if enough artists sign on. For them, it’s yet another social network they need to think about. For the biggest artists, it’s clear that they’ll post things here; probably the same things they post on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For others, who knows?

Free Trials

Apple Music is starting on June 30, with three-month free trials for everyone. (That’s potentially 800 million people.) After you’ve had Apple Music for three months, you can opt for a subscription at $10 a month, or $15 for a family plan, for up to six people. The family plan is a very good deal; the basic $10 plan is in line with what other streaming services charge.

This three-month trial is a good idea. It gives people plenty of time to discover the service, and it’s during the summer, when people are out and about, partying, vacationing, and listening on mobile devices. (Assuming their phone plan lets them burn all that data; but you can save music for offline listening.)

The downside of the family plan is that it requires that the family use Apple’s Family Sharing, which is problematic at best.

And What About Classical Music?

I know lots of my readers wonder about this. It’s obvious that the radio stations and playlists won’t do anything useful for classical music, but accessing much or most of the iTunes Store’s library of music will provide a huge library of classical music. You’ll be able to listen to what you want, make playlists (such as all of a given composer’s symphonies or string trios, not “the best adagios”). As such, this could be a good deal.

And What About Record Labels?

If you can stream much or most of the music in the iTunes Store for $10 a month, why buy CDs? This is the big unknown. How will small record labels survive? With services like Spotify, the penetration hasn’t been deep enough to affect too many bottom lines, but, already, smaller labels are suffering. With Apple Music, and its much broader reach, I think small, independent record labels will suffer. If it’s as easy as it sounds to listen to nearly anything – and Apple Music sounds like it will be a lot more user-friendly than Spotify – this could have a chilling effect on new music production.

I bought three CDs yesterday from an indie artist I like (including the excellent Codex, by Ghost Harmonic). Would I have bought them if I could stream them with my Apple Music subscription? Perhaps. Humans act in their own self-interest, economically, and committing $120 per year to music may make a lot of people not buy anything.

I wonder how the iTunes Store will work with Apple Music. Will it offer discounts on albums after you’ve streamed them a few times? In any case, why would you ever buy anything that’s on the iTunes Store now?

Streaming is certainly part of music’s future; but will the ubiquity of Apple Music – based on the many existing iTunes Store customers – turn it into the mainstream way of listening?

34 thoughts on “Apple Music: a Close Look at How it Works

  1. I’m very skeptical of Apple Music. I agree with you that the presenters were terrible. I kept wanting to turn off the video feed but kept going in hopes I would hear something that would pique my interest. It didn’t come. Most of my listening is of classical music, with lots of Grateful Dead, alternative artists, jazz and classic film soundtracks. There was nothing in the presentation that made me feel that anyone had any idea what they were doing with classical music. I’ve attempted in the past to listen to classical music channels in iTunes Radio and have consistently been extremely disappointed with the lack of any thought put into these channels. At this point in time, I give Apple Music a three month (maximum) trial. I don’t expect to be converted. I’m hoping I’m wrong. The ball is in your court, Apple. It’s up to you to bring me on board.

    • Classical music, or jazz, or jam bands, or eclectic things like Afrobeat and Indian classical music. It’s a pop machine, at least on the surface. But we’ll see; if it’s just about streaming on demand, then it’s a huge library at your fingertips.

      • Someone mentioned Indian Classical!!! There was not even a way to select it as my genere in ‘You’ tab (I am using In USA). The library has tracks, just hard to find.

  2. I’m very skeptical of Apple Music. I agree with you that the presenters were terrible. I kept wanting to turn off the video feed but kept going in hopes I would hear something that would pique my interest. It didn’t come. Most of my listening is of classical music, with lots of Grateful Dead, alternative artists, jazz and classic film soundtracks. There was nothing in the presentation that made me feel that anyone had any idea what they were doing with classical music. I’ve attempted in the past to listen to classical music channels in iTunes Radio and have consistently been extremely disappointed with the lack of any thought put into these channels. At this point in time, I give Apple Music a three month (maximum) trial. I don’t expect to be converted. I’m hoping I’m wrong. The ball is in your court, Apple. It’s up to you to bring me on board.

    • Classical music, or jazz, or jam bands, or eclectic things like Afrobeat and Indian classical music. It’s a pop machine, at least on the surface. But we’ll see; if it’s just about streaming on demand, then it’s a huge library at your fingertips.

      • Someone mentioned Indian Classical!!! There was not even a way to select it as my genere in ‘You’ tab (I am using In USA). The library has tracks, just hard to find.

  3. I’m not a big iTunes user. I use Spotify (paid), Bandcamp and Soundcloud, so I don’t see a pressing need to join Apple Music. I use streaming services to listen to new music prior to purchase – I don’t necessarily want to have to maintain an account with a streaming service indefinitely in the future. In fact, since I joined Spotify, my rate of music purchasing has escalated alarmingly (CD, download, and occasional vinyl).

    I do most of my listening from my music collection via the Logitech Squeezebox system. Maybe I’m too old or old-fashioned. But I’m not a target Apple Music user, I guess.

    Robert

  4. I’m not a big iTunes user. I use Spotify (paid), Bandcamp and Soundcloud, so I don’t see a pressing need to join Apple Music. I use streaming services to listen to new music prior to purchase – I don’t necessarily want to have to maintain an account with a streaming service indefinitely in the future. In fact, since I joined Spotify, my rate of music purchasing has escalated alarmingly (CD, download, and occasional vinyl).

    I do most of my listening from my music collection via the Logitech Squeezebox system. Maybe I’m too old or old-fashioned. But I’m not a target Apple Music user, I guess.

    Robert

  5. Well, I’m intrigued and I’m hopeful about this new streaming service. I’m almost a 100% classical music listener. I have a large(ish) library of 25,029 songs on my computer, some of it downloaded via iTunes, some from other download sites, and quite a few ripped cd’s. My main worry is the matching issue. iTunes Match didn’t work for me because it matched so poorly to what I have, even tracks purchased in the iTunes Store. It meant a lot of never ending uploading.

    If this new service works similarly then it could be uploading for days, especially the ripped tracks and albums I’ve purchased over ether years. This is a great potential strain on my broadband infrastructure and monthly data cap, even if it means uploading a couple of hundred tracks. Remember classical tracks are ‘movements’ often many minutes long! In practice this could be a deal breaker to Apple’s streaming service for me.

    Of course, I’ll try it out and see, but I’m not spending hours worrying about uploading stuff to Apple’s servers when all I want to do is stream, listen to and enjoy music.

    Always good articles Kirk. Thanks. Mark (Australia)

  6. Well, I’m intrigued and I’m hopeful about this new streaming service. I’m almost a 100% classical music listener. I have a large(ish) library of 25,029 songs on my computer, some of it downloaded via iTunes, some from other download sites, and quite a few ripped cd’s. My main worry is the matching issue. iTunes Match didn’t work for me because it matched so poorly to what I have, even tracks purchased in the iTunes Store. It meant a lot of never ending uploading.

    If this new service works similarly then it could be uploading for days, especially the ripped tracks and albums I’ve purchased over ether years. This is a great potential strain on my broadband infrastructure and monthly data cap, even if it means uploading a couple of hundred tracks. Remember classical tracks are ‘movements’ often many minutes long! In practice this could be a deal breaker to Apple’s streaming service for me.

    Of course, I’ll try it out and see, but I’m not spending hours worrying about uploading stuff to Apple’s servers when all I want to do is stream, listen to and enjoy music.

    Always good articles Kirk. Thanks. Mark (Australia)

  7. Kirk,

    Thanks for the best Apple Music write-up I’ve seen yet. Looks like this is where the classical fans gather to fret about whether Apple has got this right. I’m glad to be here.

    I thought the Apple Music presentation was a big mess–the worst Apple has ever delivered. They gave only the slightest hint that they understand the product they are delivering. Here’s the pitch they should have made:

    “Apple Music is the soundtrack for your life–past, present, and future.

    Music lovers have collected music from all different sources–ripped LPs, ripped CDs, bootleg concerts, downloads from flash-in-the-pan bands, etc.–through our lives. Our musical history is important to us. We don’t want to lose it.

    Music lovers also have big appetites–we always want to sample and discover the best new stuff. Or the best old stuff. We want to pick and choose from the biggest, best, library of possibilities.

    Finally, music lovers value quality, and in a world of such abundant choice, it’s hard to know what to pick. We need new ways to find the next greatest song or artist.

    Apple Music brings it all together in one place:
    – makes your existing library available from any device.
    – combines it with a virtually unlimited catalog of currently-available music.
    – offers new ways to discover new music through Beats1 and Connect.

    Apple Music is the soundtrack for your life–past, present, future.”

    I think that is, in fact, what Apple intends to provide. But they failed to articulate their case and differentiate themselves from everyone else.

    Yeah, yeah, human curation. Great, but it wasn’t enough to assure Beats’ success before Apple scooped it up.

    Yeah, yeah, Connect. Ping v2.0 does not seem different enough from its predecessor to assure success. It’s “just another” social network that the artists’ agents need to update with the same material it uses on the others.

    Apple Music’s “special sauce” went nearly unmentioned. It’s integration: your existing music library and the iTunes library–all available anytime, anywhere. Spotify can’t do this; Rdio can’t do this. Tidal can’t do this. Only Apple.

  8. Kirk,

    Thanks for the best Apple Music write-up I’ve seen yet. Looks like this is where the classical fans gather to fret about whether Apple has got this right. I’m glad to be here.

    I thought the Apple Music presentation was a big mess–the worst Apple has ever delivered. They gave only the slightest hint that they understand the product they are delivering. Here’s the pitch they should have made:

    “Apple Music is the soundtrack for your life–past, present, and future.

    Music lovers have collected music from all different sources–ripped LPs, ripped CDs, bootleg concerts, downloads from flash-in-the-pan bands, etc.–through our lives. Our musical history is important to us. We don’t want to lose it.

    Music lovers also have big appetites–we always want to sample and discover the best new stuff. Or the best old stuff. We want to pick and choose from the biggest, best, library of possibilities.

    Finally, music lovers value quality, and in a world of such abundant choice, it’s hard to know what to pick. We need new ways to find the next greatest song or artist.

    Apple Music brings it all together in one place:
    – makes your existing library available from any device.
    – combines it with a virtually unlimited catalog of currently-available music.
    – offers new ways to discover new music through Beats1 and Connect.

    Apple Music is the soundtrack for your life–past, present, future.”

    I think that is, in fact, what Apple intends to provide. But they failed to articulate their case and differentiate themselves from everyone else.

    Yeah, yeah, human curation. Great, but it wasn’t enough to assure Beats’ success before Apple scooped it up.

    Yeah, yeah, Connect. Ping v2.0 does not seem different enough from its predecessor to assure success. It’s “just another” social network that the artists’ agents need to update with the same material it uses on the others.

    Apple Music’s “special sauce” went nearly unmentioned. It’s integration: your existing music library and the iTunes library–all available anytime, anywhere. Spotify can’t do this; Rdio can’t do this. Tidal can’t do this. Only Apple.

  9. This sounds OK, but I want to see Apple’s implementation first. I have an iTunes library with lossless CD rips and lossless downloads on a computer. I have very few iTunes store downloads. Ideally they would see what I have in my library on my computer and let me have access from the cloud on my phone. I really don’t want to have them touch my home iTunes library since I don’t trust Apple not to mess things up.

    • If this is all you want, Apple already offers that with iTunes Match, which apparently is not going away when Apple Music debuts.

  10. This sounds OK, but I want to see Apple’s implementation first. I have an iTunes library with lossless CD rips and lossless downloads on a computer. I have very few iTunes store downloads. Ideally they would see what I have in my library on my computer and let me have access from the cloud on my phone. I really don’t want to have them touch my home iTunes library since I don’t trust Apple not to mess things up.

    • If this is all you want, Apple already offers that with iTunes Match, which apparently is not going away when Apple Music debuts.

  11. I would only be interested for Classical Music and a limited amount of Jazz. My worry is that it will go the same way as Qobuz, where I used to be a subscriber until last month. Initially it was great and I could stream from a very wide range of albums from pretty much any composer you could think of. Then more and more restrictions came in as an increasing number of albums, at the request of the publisher, would only permit 30 second samples from each track. By last month, IMHO, it had become unusable for this reason and certainly not worth the GBP15 per month I was paying.

    • From what I understand, a number of labels pulled their content from Qobuz’s streaming because of the company’s financial difficulties. I don’t think we’ll see the same problems with Apple Music. However, I know for a fact that some independent classical and jazz labels are not going to opt into Apple Music streaming.

      • This is sad news. I’ve been an Rdio user for a few years, and until six months ago their classical selection has been remarkable. Recently, Chandos, BIS, and Naxos (among others) have limited their streaming libraries on Rdio. I was hoping that Apple could draw them back in the fold. If they can’t, the service becomes a lot less compelling to me.

        • The problem with classical music and streaming services is that a classical album that is, say, four tracks, only nets the amount of money that four 4-minute songs would net. As such, much classical music doesn’t make enough from streaming for it to be worthwhile. I don’t blame the classical labels for their decision; I blame the streaming services for not treating classical music as different from pop. (The same could be said for a lot of jazz, Indian classical music, Afrobeat, such as Fela Kuti, whose songs are full LP sides, and much more).

          • Good point.

            And what happens if a listener decides after 10 minutes of a Bruckner symphony–half a movement–to switch to something else? Does that even count as 1 completed song?

            I agree that this is a problem with streaming services. Maybe they should compensate based on time played rather than tracks?

  12. I would only be interested for Classical Music and a limited amount of Jazz. My worry is that it will go the same way as Qobuz, where I used to be a subscriber until last month. Initially it was great and I could stream from a very wide range of albums from pretty much any composer you could think of. Then more and more restrictions came in as an increasing number of albums, at the request of the publisher, would only permit 30 second samples from each track. By last month, IMHO, it had become unusable for this reason and certainly not worth the GBP15 per month I was paying.

    • From what I understand, a number of labels pulled their content from Qobuz’s streaming because of the company’s financial difficulties. I don’t think we’ll see the same problems with Apple Music. However, I know for a fact that some independent classical and jazz labels are not going to opt into Apple Music streaming.

      • This is sad news. I’ve been an Rdio user for a few years, and until six months ago their classical selection has been remarkable. Recently, Chandos, BIS, and Naxos (among others) have limited their streaming libraries on Rdio. I was hoping that Apple could draw them back in the fold. If they can’t, the service becomes a lot less compelling to me.

        • The problem with classical music and streaming services is that a classical album that is, say, four tracks, only nets the amount of money that four 4-minute songs would net. As such, much classical music doesn’t make enough from streaming for it to be worthwhile. I don’t blame the classical labels for their decision; I blame the streaming services for not treating classical music as different from pop. (The same could be said for a lot of jazz, Indian classical music, Afrobeat, such as Fela Kuti, whose songs are full LP sides, and much more).

          • Good point.

            And what happens if a listener decides after 10 minutes of a Bruckner symphony–half a movement–to switch to something else? Does that even count as 1 completed song?

            I agree that this is a problem with streaming services. Maybe they should compensate based on time played rather than tracks?

  13. Kirk, Many thanks for the update and for the background on Qobuz, which I did not know. I will have to try and find out which labels are going to be there and which not. If for example Hyperion, Chandos or Naxos are not there, I probably will not be a subscriber also. Wilson

    • I’m pretty sure Hyperion was never available for streaming, just like Harmonia Mundi and ECM. As for the others, I’m not sure; I’m pretty sure Naxos was available, when I subscribed briefly to Qobuz, about two years ago.

      • This is generally consistent with my experience on Rdio:

        Hyperion doesn’t play the streaming game.
        Harmonia Mundi is available and up to date on Rdio.
        Naxos stopped providing regular, timely updates on Rdio in October or November, but recently updated their releases through, January.
        Chandos not only stopped updating its library last fall, but in March they literally removed everything released in the past decade or so.

        This was so distressing–it happened while I was listening to several Chandos records. Then things went janky, I hit refresh, and it was gone! Worst moment of my streaming life!

  14. Kirk, Many thanks for the update and for the background on Qobuz, which I did not know. I will have to try and find out which labels are going to be there and which not. If for example Hyperion, Chandos or Naxos are not there, I probably will not be a subscriber also. Wilson

    • I’m pretty sure Hyperion was never available for streaming, just like Harmonia Mundi and ECM. As for the others, I’m not sure; I’m pretty sure Naxos was available, when I subscribed briefly to Qobuz, about two years ago.

      • This is generally consistent with my experience on Rdio:

        Hyperion doesn’t play the streaming game.
        Harmonia Mundi is available and up to date on Rdio.
        Naxos stopped providing regular, timely updates on Rdio in October or November, but recently updated their releases through, January.
        Chandos not only stopped updating its library last fall, but in March they literally removed everything released in the past decade or so.

        This was so distressing–it happened while I was listening to several Chandos records. Then things went janky, I hit refresh, and it was gone! Worst moment of my streaming life!

  15. I tried Match a couple of years ago. I left my Mac on to upload songs, and when I woke up in the morning nothing had uploaded. However, I discovered over time that songs had been deleted from my hard drive. My collection was was over 70,000 songs, so it wasn’t immediately obvious that some had disappeared, and I discovered them gradually. I had continued to back up to a drive that then also lost the songs. Fortunately I had an old backup that seems to have had every song I lost. In contrast, I just uploaded 45,000 songs to Google Play without a hitch, aside from the fact that it took about 3 weeks. Google Play is supposed to allow for 50,000 songs, but for some reason I’m maxed at 45k. I wouldn’t go near Match again.

  16. I tried Match a couple of years ago. I left my Mac on to upload songs, and when I woke up in the morning nothing had uploaded. However, I discovered over time that songs had been deleted from my hard drive. My collection was was over 70,000 songs, so it wasn’t immediately obvious that some had disappeared, and I discovered them gradually. I had continued to back up to a drive that then also lost the songs. Fortunately I had an old backup that seems to have had every song I lost. In contrast, I just uploaded 45,000 songs to Google Play without a hitch, aside from the fact that it took about 3 weeks. Google Play is supposed to allow for 50,000 songs, but for some reason I’m maxed at 45k. I wouldn’t go near Match again.

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