Apple opposes judge’s order to unlock iPhone used by San Bernardino attacker

Apple has been ordered by Judge Pym to offer its technical assistance, including, if required, to provide signed software, to bypass or disable the auto-erase function whether or not it has been turned on, to enable the FBI to submit passcodes to the device for testing electronically via the physical device port available on the phone, and to ensure that when the FBI tests passcodes on the phone, software running on the device will not purposefully introduce any additional delay between passcode attempts beyond what is incurred by Apple hardware.

[…]

“Building a version of iOS that bypasses security in this way would undeniably create a backdoor. And while the government may argue that its use would be limited to this case, there is no way to guarantee such control. … While we believe the FBI’s intentions are good, it would be wrong for the government to force us to build a backdoor into our products. And ultimately, we fear that this demand would undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.”

What he said.

(Via Macworld.)

12 thoughts on “Apple opposes judge’s order to unlock iPhone used by San Bernardino attacker

  1. I hope they’ll fight it all the way through the top courts, and have more success than Microsoft in their fight against seizure of mails stored on servers located in a non-US country (the case isn’t finished yet, though. afaik).

    Once the US government gets its wish for backdoors, every government from Japan to the UK and all the countries in between will ask for one as well.

  2. I hope they’ll fight it all the way through the top courts, and have more success than Microsoft in their fight against seizure of mails stored on servers located in a non-US country (the case isn’t finished yet, though. afaik).

    Once the US government gets its wish for backdoors, every government from Japan to the UK and all the countries in between will ask for one as well.

  3. LOTS and LOTS of funny business going on here.

    – The NSA, and any high-end cracking adversary, can ALREADY break into that phone, since it’s an older model iPhone.

    – The Feds admit they made zero attempts to decrypt the iPhone, which they could accomplish.

    – Apple ALREADY complies with legal warrants to decrypt older model iPhone like this one.

    – The Feds didn’t issue a legal warrant for this phone, as is normal practice with older model iPhones.

    So, what’s going on, given that this is utterly unnecessary to get into this phone? The Feds are cynically using this VERY high profile terrorism case to SET A PRECEDENT to force Apple to create a backdoor for NEWER iPhones. And they’re using a law passed in 1789 to do it.

    Kinda unbelievable. I’m damn cynical, but even I’m not cynical enough to have imagined this kind of scenario.

  4. LOTS and LOTS of funny business going on here.

    – The NSA, and any high-end cracking adversary, can ALREADY break into that phone, since it’s an older model iPhone.

    – The Feds admit they made zero attempts to decrypt the iPhone, which they could accomplish.

    – Apple ALREADY complies with legal warrants to decrypt older model iPhone like this one.

    – The Feds didn’t issue a legal warrant for this phone, as is normal practice with older model iPhones.

    So, what’s going on, given that this is utterly unnecessary to get into this phone? The Feds are cynically using this VERY high profile terrorism case to SET A PRECEDENT to force Apple to create a backdoor for NEWER iPhones. And they’re using a law passed in 1789 to do it.

    Kinda unbelievable. I’m damn cynical, but even I’m not cynical enough to have imagined this kind of scenario.

  5. “Once the US government gets its wish for backdoors, every government from Japan to the UK and all the countries in between will ask for one as well.”

    It’s even worse than that. Once the backdoor is created, other state actors, and then a bit later, criminal outfits, will simply be able to EXPLOIT that backdoor.

  6. “Once the US government gets its wish for backdoors, every government from Japan to the UK and all the countries in between will ask for one as well.”

    It’s even worse than that. Once the backdoor is created, other state actors, and then a bit later, criminal outfits, will simply be able to EXPLOIT that backdoor.

  7. the ‘bad guys’ are loving this.
    it’s obvious to everyone why opening backdoors is a bad idea, except, it seems, the ‘good guys’…
    depressing…

  8. the ‘bad guys’ are loving this.
    it’s obvious to everyone why opening backdoors is a bad idea, except, it seems, the ‘good guys’…
    depressing…

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