Apple Phasing Out iTunes Store Access for Original Apple TV

Apple TV 1st GenRemember the 1st generation Apple TV? The one that was a sort of iPod for the living room? You’d sync content to it from your iTunes library, then watch it on your TV, using HDMI or component video connections.

This has long been an obsolete device, but Apple is adding another limitation.

Also beginning May 25, security changes will prevent Apple TV (1st generation) from using the iTunes Store. This device is an obsolete Apple product and will not be updated to support these security changes.

After the changes, you’ll only be able to access the iTunes Store on Apple TV (2nd generation) or later.

I only recall syncing content to the 1st generation Apple TV, not accessing the iTunes Store directly on the device. So I’m not sure if you’ll be able to use it by manually syncing content in the future or if it is truly dead.

The 1st generation Apple TV was available with either 40 or 160 GB storage, and is still a useful device. Does anyone still use one? If so, what do you plan to do after this change?

8 thoughts on “Apple Phasing Out iTunes Store Access for Original Apple TV

  1. I used them as a way to play my music, either by AirPlay from a different device (like a Mac) or from the TV itself with local control. However, you didn’t actually need to sync them with any data at all. Like the later TVs you could simply access the iTunes music stored on another Mac on the local network. I would think this will still work. Bizarrely though accessing remote music data or music stored on the device itself used a different sort order for the data as listed on screen. Good old Apple consistency. 🙂

    I still have a couple that I no longer use, but for me, accessing the iTunes store was not part of its remit so losing it would not be a problem at all.

    • Yes, I don’t recall it accessing the iTunes Store at all. I recall either syncing content from an iTunes library, or, as you say, using AirPlay.

  2. I used them as a way to play my music, either by AirPlay from a different device (like a Mac) or from the TV itself with local control. However, you didn’t actually need to sync them with any data at all. Like the later TVs you could simply access the iTunes music stored on another Mac on the local network. I would think this will still work. Bizarrely though accessing remote music data or music stored on the device itself used a different sort order for the data as listed on screen. Good old Apple consistency. 🙂

    I still have a couple that I no longer use, but for me, accessing the iTunes store was not part of its remit so losing it would not be a problem at all.

    • Yes, I don’t recall it accessing the iTunes Store at all. I recall either syncing content from an iTunes library, or, as you say, using AirPlay.

  3. They’re citing “security changes” as the reason, so perhaps this has something to do with FairPlay DRM and what it actually means is that the original AppleTV won’t be able to play videos purchased on the iTunes Store?

  4. They’re citing “security changes” as the reason, so perhaps this has something to do with FairPlay DRM and what it actually means is that the original AppleTV won’t be able to play videos purchased on the iTunes Store?

  5. Security changes could also be the overall tightening of secure internet protocols. Old mac os versions (snow leopard and maybe a couple of more recent) already can’t access many secure sites such as banks. But updated Fairplay could be in there too.

    I fear that the change will stop me accessing the iTunes store on my snow leopard mini with iTunes 10, which is my media server. It’s the only useful way I can buy/rent then play video from iTunes because on my newer systems (el cap), iTunes doesn’t like my old HP monitor and refuses to play to it. Snowie/iTunes 10 don’t give a fig and all is fine. I guess it’ll be back to buying DVDs, sigh.

    The upside is that I’ll get to recover an Apple ID authorization.

  6. Security changes could also be the overall tightening of secure internet protocols. Old mac os versions (snow leopard and maybe a couple of more recent) already can’t access many secure sites such as banks. But updated Fairplay could be in there too.

    I fear that the change will stop me accessing the iTunes store on my snow leopard mini with iTunes 10, which is my media server. It’s the only useful way I can buy/rent then play video from iTunes because on my newer systems (el cap), iTunes doesn’t like my old HP monitor and refuses to play to it. Snowie/iTunes 10 don’t give a fig and all is fine. I guess it’ll be back to buying DVDs, sigh.

    The upside is that I’ll get to recover an Apple ID authorization.

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