Here, in the birthplace of Shakespeare, theater artists and technologists are trying to reimagine stagecraft for the digital age.

Experimenting with one of Shakespeare’s greatest — and final — plays, the Royal Shakespeare Company, working with Intel and a London-based production company called the Imaginarium, has mounted a “Tempest” in which Ariel’s physical transformations are made visible with what the collaborators say is the most elaborate use of motion capture ever attempted in live theater.

It certainly is ambitious. But what makes this a good production really isn’t the technology. Read my review.

To be fair, the technology will probably work better in the filmed production, and it’s worth seeing it that way.

Source: At This ‘Tempest,’ Digital Wizardry Makes ‘Rough Magic’ – The New York Times

2 thoughts on “

  1. Such a shame that this doesn’t really lay down any sort of verdict. It seems to be more a re-hash of all the puffery issued by the guilty parties – I presume in advance of a cinema broadcast.

    I think *your* review is much more realistic – and people visiting this page should therefore read it, as well – as you state!

    I will be seeing it again, in a week, from the captioned seats – which, unless last-minute changes are to be made, will be stage left, just behind the ship’s foremost spars, in the gallery… – and I am extremely doubtful that the RSC will be able to make both the captions and projection technology visible simultaneously. (If this turns out to be the case, I shall be conjuring up my own storm – as such an outcome would be discriminatory.) We shall see… (perhaps?!)!

    Thanks for highlighting this write-up, anyway. And Happy New Year!

  2. Such a shame that this doesn’t really lay down any sort of verdict. It seems to be more a re-hash of all the puffery issued by the guilty parties – I presume in advance of a cinema broadcast.

    I think *your* review is much more realistic – and people visiting this page should therefore read it, as well – as you state!

    I will be seeing it again, in a week, from the captioned seats – which, unless last-minute changes are to be made, will be stage left, just behind the ship’s foremost spars, in the gallery… – and I am extremely doubtful that the RSC will be able to make both the captions and projection technology visible simultaneously. (If this turns out to be the case, I shall be conjuring up my own storm – as such an outcome would be discriminatory.) We shall see… (perhaps?!)!

    Thanks for highlighting this write-up, anyway. And Happy New Year!

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