Book Review: Treasury of the True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen’s Shobo Genzo

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Dogen’s Shobogenzo is the most profound and perplexing work of the Zen canon. Written in the 13th century by the founder of the Soto school of Zen, the Shobogenzo is a collection of texts written over a long period of time that examine the concepts and practices of Zen.

This edition is a milestone, representing a complete English translation of the Shobogenzo, in an extremely attractive set of books. The two volumes are, while a bit expensive, very well produced. The paper is thick and opaque, the font is very readable, and the binding will last one or more lifetimes. Volume one has introductory matter about Dogen’s life and the composition of the Shobogenzo, and the first part of the texts (fascicles 1-47). (For a more thorough discussion of Dogen’s life and career, as well as an analysis of his thought, see Eihei Dogen: Mystical Realist, by Hee-Jin Kim.) The second volume contains the remainder of the texts (fascicles 48-95 plus a 96th fascicle not included in the original edition of the Shobogenzo), and an extensive glossary explaining the terms used in the books.

Some of the texts in this collection have been published previously, in Moon in a Dewdrop, Beyond Thinking, and Enlightenment Unfolds. In fact, many readers may find those there volumes sufficient in content, and more agreeable in overall price. (Another useful book is Realizing Genjokoan: The Key to Dogen’s Shobogenzo, by Shohaku Okumura, which is a detailed, and very accessible commentary on this section of the Shobogenzo.)

This glossary in volume two is essential to the reading and study of this work. Readers will need to look up terms to get a better understanding of what they really mean. Often a single word, or a short phrase, may seem obscure when reading, but the glossary goes into detail to explain it better. In addition, the glossary serves as an index, with references to where the terms are used.

But the glossary is a bit problematic. At more than 200 pages, this is a big chunk of the text, and it is, of course, only available in the second volume. If you are reading the first volume, you still need to have this glossary handy, so you’ll need to have both books. I wish that Shambhala had included the glossary as a separate volume – perhaps a paperback – so it could be more easily consulted. Or, if they could provide an e-book version, popping it on an iPad would make reading and consulting it more practical.

This doesn’t detract from the overall work, which is, I must say, an amazing feat of translation that has taken decades. The text is beautifully rendered, and, while just one interpretation, it certainly has the weight of experience both of the translators as translators and as practitioners. This set is a monument to the work of Dogen.

Note: the original two-volume edition is out of print, but there is a one-volume edition (Amazon.com, Amazon UK) that has replaced it. I haven’t seen it, but it apparently has much thinner paper. There’s also a Kindle edition (Amazon.com, Amazon UK) which is great for reading on the go, since the book is so heavy, but the glossary is essentially unusable on the Kindle.

4 thoughts on “Book Review: Treasury of the True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen’s Shobo Genzo

  1. From the sublime to the quotidian, I recommend the recent book Confessions of a Buddhist Atheist as an intro to the Dharma for Western non-religionists put off by some of the ancient accretions of Buddhist theology that seem at first glance to conflict with modern thinking.

    (The book is less interesting for those already conversant in the topic, but is a readable intro for others. It might serve as a gateway drug for some untutored Western readers.)

  2. From the sublime to the quotidian, I recommend the recent book Confessions of a Buddhist Atheist as an intro to the Dharma for Western non-religionists put off by some of the ancient accretions of Buddhist theology that seem at first glance to conflict with modern thinking.

    (The book is less interesting for those already conversant in the topic, but is a readable intro for others. It might serve as a gateway drug for some untutored Western readers.)

  3. I very much like Stephen Batchelor’s books, notably his Buddhism Without Beliefs. I haven’t read this one yet, but I will check it out. Thanks for pointing it out.

  4. I very much like Stephen Batchelor’s books, notably his Buddhism Without Beliefs. I haven’t read this one yet, but I will check it out. Thanks for pointing it out.

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