PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 115: iPhone Camera Tips and Tricks

Millions of people take billions of photos using the built-in Camera app on their iPhones, so we wanted to do an episode all about the clever and sometimes hidden capabilities of this camera that’s always with you.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 114: Why Color Doesn’t Exist

An offhand remark from our guest Bryan Jones when he was a guest on a previous episode stuck with us: “You know color doesn’t actually exist, right?” We had to invite him back to explain! Jones, a retinal neuroscientist, explains that color is really a shared hallucination and talks about how photographers can take advantage of this knowledge.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Landscape photographer Michael Kenna on viewing old work with fresh eyes, and the joys of the analog process

In March 2020, when COVID-19 led to worldwide lockdowns, Michael Kenna had a full calendar of trips and exhibits planned for the months to come. Instead, he found himself stuck at home with nowhere to go. Rather than taking new photos, he went back into his archive to look with fresh eyes at some of his earliest work. The result is Northern England 1983-1986, a book of photos from the area around where Kenna was born and grew up.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 113: Do Photographers Need the Mac Studio?

Apple announced the Mac Studio, a brand new M1-based desktop Mac that smokes the performance of even the Mac Pro. But is it a good machine for photographers? Jeff and Kirk discuss what’s interesting about the Mac Studio and the new Studio Display.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Magnum’s latest Square Print Sale showcases ‘the start of something new’

Magnum is back with another of its regular Square Print Sales, allowing collectors to purchase affordably-priced signed or estate-stamped 6-by-6-inch photos by well-known photographers.

At $100 each, this is a great way to start or expand a photo collection. And you can choose from a wide range of images, including photos depicting historical events, portraits of famous people, snapshots of touching moments, or whimsical slices of life.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

Alec Soth’s ‘Pound of Pictures,’ and four other analog-only photobooks worth checking out

It’s Film Week here on PopPhoto, and to celebrate, we’ve rounded up a selection of contemporary photobooks—and one classic—all shot on film.

Documentary shooter Alec Soth set out to photograph America, by following the route of Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train, and ended up buying “photos by the pound.” Robert Adams shows the “silence of America” in a 50-year retrospective. A half-dozen collotype prints show the ethereal work of Rinko Kawauchi. Deanna Templeton links recent portraits of adolescent women with her own teenage years. And Diane Arbus’s only photo portfolio is still powerful after more than 50 years.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

The joy of fixed-lens cameras

I went out walking this morning, and I took my Leica Q2 Monochrom with me. Walking among the fields around my home in rural England is always interesting: the light changes often, the sky varies from hour to hour, and the crops in the fields show new tones as the seasons progress.

Since the Q2 is a fixed-lens camera, I didn’t need to decide which lens to take. I also own a Fujifilm X-E4, with a panoply of prime and zoom lenses, and when I shoot with that camera, choosing which lens or lenses will be ideal for the photos I plan to take can be complex. And my camera bag can end up quite heavy. With the Q2, there’s nothing additional to carry.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 112: Dan Bracaglia on Discovering Joy

Dan Bracaglia joins us again to talk about that perennial problem: rekindling the joy of photography. Especially in winter, it’s easy to remain uninspired about photography, when in fact we know that there are image possibilities everywhere. We chat about some unusual steps to find fun in photography.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Annie Leibovitz’s fashion portraits, and five other photobooks worth checking out

For our second edition of photobooks worth checking out, we’ve got a half dozen works that cover a diversity of photographic styles and subjects. These include Annie Leibovitz’s fashion photos; Joe McNally’s career compendium with how-to tips; Matt Black’s five-year project documenting American poverty; a compilation of photos exploring Black identity; Bieke Depoorter’s serendipitous collaboration with a Parisian stranger; and Fred Herzog’s classic Kodachrome photos.

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Martin Parr on collecting photobooks, shooting tennis, and the challenges of modern street photography

Martin Parr’s photography is instantly recognizable. He zeroes in on the foibles of everyday life, focusing on people in their natural surroundings, highlighting the quirkiness of their lives. A Magnum photographer since 1994, Parr has published more than 100 photobooks and now oversees the Martin Parr Foundation in Bristol, England, where he presents exhibitions and hosts talks with photographers.

Parr once had one of the most extensive collections of photobooks in the world, and, in 2017, the Tate Gallery in London acquired the more than 12,000 books he had amassed since the 1980s. I asked Parr if it was hard to let go of the collection, and he said, “Yes, but I knew it was going to happen, and I knew it was the right thing to do. It was too difficult to look after, too valuable; it became a liability as much as an asset. And I couldn’t afford to insure it for its true value; it was worth millions.”

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.