Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #223: How to Run Windows on an M1 Mac

A new Safari vulnerability can leak your browser history, 5G can interfere with airplane altimeters, Google Analytics is being targeted by EU courts, and we take a deep dive into running Windows on an M1 Mac.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Organize Your Scrivener Project with the Corkboard

Scrivener offers three ways to organize your projects: the Binder, the Outliner, and the Corkboard. We’ve looked at how you can Use Folders and Texts to Power Up the Scrivener Binder, and how you can Plan Your Project with Scrivener’s Outliner. We have also examined how you can outline with just the Binder.

Now it’s time to look at Scrivener’s third organizational tool, the Corkboard. Modeled after a real “analog” corkboard, Scrivener’s tool lets you arrange and rearrange virtual index cards in order to plan and organize your projects. Here’s how to work with the Corkboard.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #222: SysJoker Malware and Scams in the App Store

New SysJoker malware attacks Mac, Windows, and Linux computers. Apple has difficulty managing scams and copycat apps in its App Stores. And iCloud Private Relay is provoking ire among phone carriers.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Plan Your Project with Scrivener’s Outliner

Are you a planner or a pantser*? Do you meticulously flesh out the details of a story, novel, or screenplay, or do you just wing it? If you write non-fiction, do you itemize each chapter and section before you start writing?

If you do plan your work in advance, you may do so by creating an outline, and Scrivener’s built-in Outline mode is a powerful tool to prepare for writing. In addition, it interfaces with the Binder to allow you to immediately switch from outlining to writing.

In this article, I’m going to show you how you can outline with Scrivener, and how you can switch back and forth between your outline and the Binder as you progress in your project.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Run Windows on an Intel or M1 Mac

For some people, running Windows on a Mac is the perfect way to use a specific app that is unavailable on Mac, or to play Windows games. For a long time, it was easy to run Windows on a Mac. Since Windows is designed to run on an Intel processor, you could Windows on your Mac and boot into Windows, or run it in a virtual machine on your Mac.

But with the new M1 Macs, which run on a variant of ARM processors, everything has changed. In this article, I’ll look at the various options for running Windows on an Intel Mac, then discuss how you can run Windows on a new M1 Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #221: Look-Alike Letters Lead Users to Lose Moola

Attackers can simulate an iPhone restart to keep malware alive, and an interesting HomeKit vulnerability could brick your device. We discuss malicious QR codes, and we take a deep dive into Apple’s two-factor authentication, which more and more users need to use Apple devices.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 9: Charlie Stross, Science-Fiction Author

Charlie Stross is a prolific author of science fiction and fantasy. He has written more than two dozen novels, has won three Hugo awards, and has been nominated for many other awards, including the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the Japanese Seiun Award.

Show notes:

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #220: The Challenge with Alexa

Amazon Alexa gave a dangerous answer to a child asking for a challenge; how much can we trust AI to provide safe, reliable information? We also look at the new RedLine malware, and discuss some iCloud settings to help you get back into your account if you’ve forgotten your password, and one that lets you set up a legacy contact.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Set iCloud Account Recovery Contacts, Legacy Contacts, and Trusted Phone Numbers

If you use Apple devices, your iCloud account is one of your most important repositories of your personal data. You don’t have to use iCloud, of course; you may use Google services for your calendar and photos, or Microsoft for email and online storage. But most Apple users store data in an iCloud account, and if you get locked out of that account, you may need a way to access your data.

Also, in the event of your death, you may want to ensure that your spouse, partner, or children can access your photos, emails, and other data.

In this article, I’ll explain how to nominate contacts to help you recover your iCloud account, if you get locked out, and how to access your account in the event of your death.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Use Two-Factor Authentication for Your Apple ID and iCloud Account

Protecting the data in your accounts is essential, and no account is more important to users of Apple devices than their Apple ID account. This account covers many features, from email to calendars, from online storage to online purchases. We have long recommended the use of two-factor authentication whenever possible, and these days it is almost essential that you set this up for your Apple ID.

In this article, I’m going to explain how Apple’s two-factor authentication (2FA) works, how to set it up, and how to prepare for situations where you may not be able to get 2FA codes.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.