How to find what software has been automatically updated on your Mac

In a recent article, we looked at how you get software updates on your Mac. You get updates in three ways. If you bought apps from the Mac App Store, that app provides updates. If you bought apps directly from developers, they apps generally use their own update system; occasionally you may need to download an update from a developer’s website. And for macOS updates and security updates, it’s the Software Update preference pane that manages these updates.

Some people prefer to update their apps and Macs manually: they check the Mac App Store or the Software Update preference pane to see when updates are available, or they react when their Macs present notifications. Others prefer to let all this occur automatically. In the latter case, you may not even notice many of the updates: they can happen in the background, though you do need to restart your Mac for major operating system and security updates. And your Mac can automatically, and silently, install “system data files and security updates” in the background without telling you.

There’s no easy way to find what has been updated, especially if updates have been made automatically in the background. You can check the Mac App Store’s Updates section to see which apps have been updated, but it only shows the most recent updates; and there’s no log for system updates. In this article, I’ll tell you how you can see a list of everything that’s been updated, automatically or manually, on your Mac via the Mac App Store and Software Update.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #137: Apple operating system updates, iPhone & iPad storage, and shooting video on an iPhone

Apple updated all its operating systems again this week, but a jailbreak vulnerability was found quickly. We discuss the new contact tracing feature in iOS, how to free up storage on an iOS device, and give some tips on shooting video on an iPhone.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Shoot Video with an iPhone

Shooting video with an iPhone is easy, but you may not know all the many options available on your device. You can choose the resolution and frame rate of your videos, shoot slow motion or time-lapse videos, and you can zoom and use the different lenses on your iPhone, if your model has multiple cameras.

But you can also take stills while you’re shooting video, and with third-party video apps, you have tight control over focus and exposure, making the iPhone good enough to shoot a feature film. (And it’s been done.)

In this article, I’m going to explain the many options available on an iPhone for shooting video. (And note that most of what I describe also applies to the iPad.)

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #136: Tips for using your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch

We look at some practical tips for getting more out of your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch. We take a close look at System Preferences, discuss using the iPad as a second screen for your Mac; and a handful of tips for making the Apple Watch more efficient. Also, Josh and Kirk disagree about Microsoft’s choice to flag two spaces after a period in Word as an error.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Clear Your Safari Browser Cache on Mac

To make your browsing experience more efficient, web browsers cache data, which means they store files on your computer. They do this so when you return to a website, you don’t need to download all if its elements. For example, if you regularly view a web page that contains a number of graphics, not downloading those graphics will save time, and save bandwidth, both for you and for the web host.

Sometimes, however, you may want or need to delete that cache. This is a first-line troubleshooting technique when you are having difficulty displaying web pages. Different browsers have different methods for doing this, and Apple’s Safari makes this complicated, for some reason. Here’s how you can delete your Safari browser cache.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Improve your Zoom, Skype, or FaceTime call experience

For many people who are working from home for the first time, Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, and other video-conferencing services have become essential communication tools. People use these for meetings, but also to keep in touch with friends and family. These apps are easy to use, but the way you experience them can be jarring if you’re not used to this sort of communication.

Improving the experience in video-conferencing is both about how you see and hear others, and how they see and hear you. The success of meetings and calls with these apps depends on everyone involved in a call or meeting ensuring that their audio and video is as good as possible.

In this article, I’m going to give you some tips to improve your experience on Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, and other video-conferencing apps.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Master Zoom with a New Book from Take Control

ZoomWork, school, and even socializing increasingly take place remotely, and Zoom has quickly become one of the most popular tools for videoconferencing—one-on-one or with a group. Take Control of Zoom explains how to use the Zoom service from start to finish. It offers detailed instructions, warnings, and tips from installing and configuring the Zoom software, through setup and participation, and how to host meetings.

Zoom is the most widely used videoconferencing system in the world due to its generous feature set for free users and the ease of joining video chats by people without prior experience. But you can learn to master some of its subtle, hard-to-find, or confusing features and increase your efficiency and enjoyment as a participant and as a host. Take Control of Zoom takes the pain out of learning how to best use this powerful tool. The book covers a broad range of topics, from which Zoom app to use and how to configure your account and app even before your first meeting, to how to work among Zoom views and chat in a meeting, to creating and managing your own meetings.

Here’s what you will find in Take Control of Zoom:

  • Learn how to install and configure Zoom.
  • Decide if a web app meets your needs or it’s something to recommend to other meeting participants.
  • Configure your physical setup and your hardware for best results on video.
  • Don’t forget that even if you don’t see a stream of yourself, you’re on camera for other people.
  • Upgrade your audio for better comfort and quality.
  • Understand Zoom’s past missteps with security and what it promises now.
  • Master participating in a meeting, including the various methods of “speaking up.”
  • Get to know Zoom’s many mobile and desktop views for seeing other people and shared screens.
  • Become a host and start meetings with one other person or 1,000.
  • Dig into Zoom’s meeting controls to create safe meetings and manage public ones, keeping participants safe and blocking or removing problematic members.
  • Find out how to preserve your privacy when sharing apps, presentations, or other parts of your screen.
  • Record a meeting for later playback, presentation, or a podcast.
  • Decide whether upgrading to a paid Zoom tier offers enough improvement and features for meetings you host.

Get Take Control of Zoom.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #135: iCloud, Thunderbolt, WWDC, and North Korean Malware

The date for this year’s WWDC has been set (June 22). Many users don’t know that the government can access some of your iCloud data (with a warrant). We look at a new Thunderbolt vulnerability that affects Macs made since 2011 (but you don’t need to worry). And we discuss contact tracing apps and new North Korean malware.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

10 Things You Shouldn’t Do on Your Work Computer (or Phone)

When you’re at the office, working on your employer’s computer, it’s important not to do certain things. The computer isn’t yours, and, if your company is large enough, your boss may use software to check what you do, which websites you’ve visited, and may even read your emails. The computer belongs to the company, and it’s their right to keep an eye on it.

The same is true if you have a work-issued laptop, or even a phone. These devices aren’t yours, and your boss can, at any time, take them back and check all the data they contain. Since a lot of people are working from home now, they may be using computers issued by their employers. To ensure that your personal data remains private, here are 10 things you should never do on a computer or phone given to you by your business.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Key Moments in the History of Mac Malware – 1982 to the Present

You’ve certainly heard people say that “Macs don’t get viruses.” And, while that’s generally true – most malware these days isn’t viruses but other types of malicious software – the Mac has a long history of malware attacks. Viruses, worms, Trojan horses; the Mac has seen them all. Here is an overview of the history of malware that has affected the Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.