Using Section Layouts to Compile Your Scrivener Project

In a recent article, I discussed the basics of compiling your Scrivener project. When you compile a Scrivener project, you export it into a form that is usable by people who do not use Scrivener. You do this to print your project, or to send a project to an agent, editor, or writing buddy, so they can read the work.

In its simplest form, compiling just pastes together all your text in a single file, using the formatting you see in Scrivener’s Editor. But the beautify of the compile tool is that you can adjust the formatting of each element of your project when compiling, and have different types of elements formatted differently; you do this with section layouts.

In this article, I’m going to explain what section layouts are, how to use them, and how to apply them to the different elements of your project when compiling.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #236: Install macOS Monterey on a 15-Year Old Mac

Josh has a 15-year old iMac that he wanted to be up to date with security updates, but it doesn’t support macOS Monterey. So he found a way to finagle the operating system on his old Mac. We also discuss how sharing your Netflix account might be dangerous, and how fake reviews will soon be illegal in the UK, and whether it can be enforced.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Compiling Your Scrivener Project: The Basics

Your Scrivener projects are meant to be temporary. You use them as you’re writing, but when you’ve finished, you need to export the text to use elsewhere. Whether you write articles, novels, non-fiction books, or screenplays, you eventually send your finished work – or your draft – to an agent or editor. This is when you use Scrivener’s compile feature, which takes the many elements in your Binder and combines them to make a single file.

Scrivener’s compile feature is complex, and in this article, I’m going to discuss the concept behind the feature, and explain how to use it in its simplest form. Future articles will go into more detail about compiling your Scrivener projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

USB-C and Thunderbolt: Understanding Ports and Cables for Macs and iPads

The ports that you use to connect keyboards, mice, and hard drives to your Macs have changed over the years. Current Macs have USB-C, which provide standard USB speeds, along with faster Thunderbolt to compatible peripherals. But what’s the difference between USB-C and Thunderbolt ports, and how can you tell them apart? And which cables do you need to get the most out of them?

In this article, I’m going to explain what Thunderbolt and USB-C ports are, how to identify them, how they work, which features they offer, and how to choose the right cables for your needs.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #235: Everything About Your Apple ID

DuckDuckGo is beta testing a privacy-focused browser; Google is deprecating old apps in its Play Store; activation-locked AirPods are wreaking havoc on refurb companies. And we take a deep dive into managing your Apple ID, the key to all Apple services.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Clean Up Your Texts with Scrivener

When you write your draft, you probably pay more attention to getting words on the page than to getting your texts just right. You may not pay attention to extra spaces, extra lines between paragraphs, whether headers are capitalized, and more.

Scrivener has some tools to help you fix little issues with texts. You may want to use these tools on your work as you near completion, and you may also need to use them to clean up texts you copy from other files or web pages, that may not be formatted correctly.

In this article, I’m going to tell you about two sets of Scrivener tools: Text Tidying and Transformations.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Manage and Use Your Apple ID – The Complete Guide

Your Apple ID is the key that opens the door to all of Apple’s services. You use it to sign into iCloud, where you manage email, calendars, contacts, and more. You use it for purchases from Apple on the iTunes Store, or on App Stores. And you also use it to sign into Messages and FaceTime, to communicate with friends, family, and co-workers.

Since this single combination of a user name and password is so important to users of Apple devices, managing your Apple ID is important. In this article, I’ll discuss how to access settings for your Apple ID, how your Apple ID uses two-factor authentication to protect access to your device, how to set up account recovery contacts and legacy contacts, how to change your Apple ID, and much more.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #234: Apple’s Security Approach Endangers Users of macOS Big Sur & Catalina

Apple has issued new updates, but hasn’t patched two serious vulnerability for Big Sur and Catalina. We also look at a serious MailChimp data breach, and how AirTags are being used more for stalking.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 12: Damon Young, Philosopher

Damon Young is a philosopher, poet, and an author of fiction for children. As a philosopher, he has written about reading, the garden, and sex, and he has also written a half-dozen children’s books. He also writes regularly for newspapers and magazines, and is a frequent guest on radio and TV.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Learn How to Record All Types of Audio on Your Mac, with Take Control of Audio Hijack

Take Control of Audio Hijack 2 0 cover 1187x1536In this 143-page book, you’ll learn how to use version 4 of Rogue Amoeba’s Audio Hijack to capture and enhance any audio coming out of your Mac, whether it’s your own voice via a microphone, a streaming radio show in Safari, or audio from a DVD. Audio expert Kirk McElhearn covers a variety of scenarios—including recording Zoom calls, digitizing LPs, and making podcasts—and provides a bonus chapter about editing your recordings in Rogue Amoeba’s Fission audio editor.

Get Take Control of Audio Hijack.

You’ll learn how to pipe sound through Audio Hijack to enhance its quality without recording. For example, by boosting the volume or tweaking the bass—movies on Netflix never sounded better!

You’ll also discover special features such as reusable sessions, recording to more than one file (and format) at once, scheduling recordings, time shifting during live playback, effects like ducking and panning, adding automatic metadata before recording, and more. And you’ll learn how to use Audio Hijack as a powerful tool for live streaming or broadcasting.

The Fission chapter has directions for trimming, cropping, adding, replacing, splitting, and fading audio. It also explains how to turn an audio file into a ringtone and—podcasters and educators take note!—how to make a chapterized AAC file.

Get Take Control of Audio Hijack.

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