Sync Scrivener for iPad and iPhone Projects Using Dropbox, iTunes, or the Finder

Scrivener for iPad and iPhone is meant to work both independently and in conjunction with Scrivener for Mac or Windows. You can create projects, write, edit, and compile on your iPad or iPhone, but you can also sync projects between your mobile device and desktop computer so you can work on both devices.

If you want to sync projects between devices, there are two ways to do so. You can use iTunes (on Windows) or the Finder (on Mac) to copy projects to and from your mobile devices. Or you can use Dropbox to sync your projects as you work on them.

In this article, I’ll look at both of these methods, and explain the pros and cons of each one.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #254: Which Is More Secure: Face ID, Touch ID, or a Passcode?

Apple has announced the date for its iPhone event; it’s on September 7, and we discuss what we could see. We also look at more mobile apps that inject javascript in web pages in their in-app browsers; are they doing this to collect data? And we look at Face ID, Touch ID, and a passcode to determine which is more secure.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Which Is More Secure: Face ID, Touch ID, or a Passcode?

In an upcoming article, we’ll look at three security concerns that Apple is aware of—one of which is that twins and siblings can sometimes fool Face ID into unlocking their look-alike’s iPhone or iPad. This is common enough that auto-reply emails from Apple’s security team include a long section about how Face ID works and why it can be defeated in those circumstances.

When Apple introduced Face ID, the company told us that it was secure. Apparently it’s secure enough that financial institutions trust it for authentication, both with Apple Pay and with many banking apps. The same is true for Touch ID. But how secure are these technologies, really?

In this article, we’ll look at each of the three methods of authenticating on an iPhone or iPad: Face ID, Touch ID, and a passcode. And we’ll discuss which is the most secure, and why.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Create and Manage Projects in Scrivener for iPad and iPhone

In a recent article, I introduced Scrivener for iPad and iPhone; I also explained how you can tweak the settings of the mobile Scrivener app so it displays the way you want it to.

In this article, I’m going to explain how you create a new project, how you add and delete documents, how you move items around in the Binder, and more.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #253: Car Hacks, Facebook Tracks, and Windows on Macs

We look at another car hack, this time when a security researcher found the public key for Hyundai updates through a Google search. We also explain how Facebook tracks you, even when you don’t allow it, and another, even easier way to run Windows on a Mac; at a cost. Finally, we look at how a security journalist almost got phished; he was this close…

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Customize Scrivener on iPad and iPhone

In last week’s article, I introduced Scrivener for iPad and iPhone. I discussed how practical it is to use Scrivener on the go, on a compact, portable device. The iOS and iPadOS versions of Scrivener don’t have all the features of the desktop app, but they offer the most important, allowing you to write and revise on your iPad, or even your iPhone.

In this article, I’ll show you how you can tweak Scrivener for iPad or iPhone to make it work the way you want. I’ll look at how you can adjust the way text displays in the Editor, and how you can adjust many of the other settings available, such as turning on dark mode, and more.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

What Do QuickTake, iSight, and iBook Have in Common? How Apple Reuses Trademarks

Apple owns a lot of trademarks and service marks; this “non-exhaustive list” includes dozens of them, registered over the four-and-a-half decades since the company was founded. There are iconic product names, such as iPod and iPhone; software, such as iCal and iTunes; and services, such as Apple Music and iCloud. These names are a key part of Apple’s branding, and are distinctive and memorable.

In general, trademarks are valid for ten years, and can be renewed indefinitely. However, companies need to show that the trademarks are still in use to be protected. In addition, trademarks are not blanket protection of a term or logo; they are granted for specific classes of products and services. This is why Apple Computer had to come to an agreement with Apple Corps, the Beatles’ record label, in order to start selling music. The trademark granted to Apple Computer covered computing devices and software, and, following the first lawsuit, Apple Computer agreed to not enter the music business. Over the years, and through multiple lawsuits, a final settlement was reached in 2007.

As part of Apple’s trademark portfolio, the company has reused several of these trademarks, in very different ways. Here are three such examples.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #252: Google Begs Apple to Replace iMessage with RCS

Google has launched a campaign to try to pressure Apple to adopt a messaging standard that is more amenable to Android users, but this is far more self-serving than it first appears. Also, we look at how Amazon wants to map your home with Roomba robot vacuum cleaners.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Get to Know Scrivener for iPad and iPhone

Scrivener for iPad and iPhone lets you work on your projects on mobile devices, and sync them back to your computer.

If you use Scrivener on a Mac or Windows computer, and haven’t yet discovered the Scrivener app for iOS and iPadOS, this series of articles about the mobile version of the app is for you. I’m going to show you how you can use Scrivener on an iPad or iPhone on its own, or in conjunction with Scrivener on your desktop or laptop computer.

In this week’s article, I’ll give you an introduction to Scrivener for iPad and iPhone, and tell you why you may want to use the mobile app. Future articles will look at how to tweak Scrivener on iPad and iPhone to work the way you want it, how to sync projects between the mobile apps and the desktop, and how to compile projects with the mobile apps.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #251: Tom Cruise and the Leap Second

Tom Cruise is showing up everywhere: landing his helicopter in an English family’s garden; interrupting hikers and leaping off a cliff; and even in deepfake videos. We also look at the leap second, and how taking away one second in time could wreak havoc on computers.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.