How to Improve your Zoom, Skype, or FaceTime call experience

For many people who are working from home for the first time, Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, and other video-conferencing services have become essential communication tools. People use these for meetings, but also to keep in touch with friends and family. These apps are easy to use, but the way you experience them can be jarring if you’re not used to this sort of communication.

Improving the experience in video-conferencing is both about how you see and hear others, and how they see and hear you. The success of meetings and calls with these apps depends on everyone involved in a call or meeting ensuring that their audio and video is as good as possible.

In this article, I’m going to give you some tips to improve your experience on Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, and other video-conferencing apps.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Master Zoom with a New Book from Take Control

ZoomWork, school, and even socializing increasingly take place remotely, and Zoom has quickly become one of the most popular tools for videoconferencing—one-on-one or with a group. Take Control of Zoom explains how to use the Zoom service from start to finish. It offers detailed instructions, warnings, and tips from installing and configuring the Zoom software, through setup and participation, and how to host meetings.

Zoom is the most widely used videoconferencing system in the world due to its generous feature set for free users and the ease of joining video chats by people without prior experience. But you can learn to master some of its subtle, hard-to-find, or confusing features and increase your efficiency and enjoyment as a participant and as a host. Take Control of Zoom takes the pain out of learning how to best use this powerful tool. The book covers a broad range of topics, from which Zoom app to use and how to configure your account and app even before your first meeting, to how to work among Zoom views and chat in a meeting, to creating and managing your own meetings.

Here’s what you will find in Take Control of Zoom:

  • Learn how to install and configure Zoom.
  • Decide if a web app meets your needs or it’s something to recommend to other meeting participants.
  • Configure your physical setup and your hardware for best results on video.
  • Don’t forget that even if you don’t see a stream of yourself, you’re on camera for other people.
  • Upgrade your audio for better comfort and quality.
  • Understand Zoom’s past missteps with security and what it promises now.
  • Master participating in a meeting, including the various methods of “speaking up.”
  • Get to know Zoom’s many mobile and desktop views for seeing other people and shared screens.
  • Become a host and start meetings with one other person or 1,000.
  • Dig into Zoom’s meeting controls to create safe meetings and manage public ones, keeping participants safe and blocking or removing problematic members.
  • Find out how to preserve your privacy when sharing apps, presentations, or other parts of your screen.
  • Record a meeting for later playback, presentation, or a podcast.
  • Decide whether upgrading to a paid Zoom tier offers enough improvement and features for meetings you host.

Get Take Control of Zoom.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #135: iCloud, Thunderbolt, WWDC, and North Korean Malware

The date for this year’s WWDC has been set (June 22). Many users don’t know that the government can access some of your iCloud data (with a warrant). We look at a new Thunderbolt vulnerability that affects Macs made since 2011 (but you don’t need to worry). And we discuss contact tracing apps and new North Korean malware.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

10 Things You Shouldn’t Do on Your Work Computer (or Phone)

When you’re at the office, working on your employer’s computer, it’s important not to do certain things. The computer isn’t yours, and, if your company is large enough, your boss may use software to check what you do, which websites you’ve visited, and may even read your emails. The computer belongs to the company, and it’s their right to keep an eye on it.

The same is true if you have a work-issued laptop, or even a phone. These devices aren’t yours, and your boss can, at any time, take them back and check all the data they contain. Since a lot of people are working from home now, they may be using computers issued by their employers. To ensure that your personal data remains private, here are 10 things you should never do on a computer or phone given to you by your business.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Key Moments in the History of Mac Malware – 1982 to the Present

You’ve certainly heard people say that “Macs don’t get viruses.” And, while that’s generally true – most malware these days isn’t viruses but other types of malicious software – the Mac has a long history of malware attacks. Viruses, worms, Trojan horses; the Mac has seen them all. Here is an overview of the history of malware that has affected the Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #134: It’s World Password Day; Why do we still use passwords?

Passwords are easy to implement, but keeping them secure is not that simple. On World Password Day, Josh and Kirk discuss how passwords might be replaced by other means of authentication. And they discuss the UK’s covid-19 contact tracing app which raises privacy concerns, a Facebook bug that caused lots of apps to fail, why you should always check that auto-completed email address, and more.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Get to Know Your Mac’s System Preferences

There are lots of settings, preferences, and options on the Mac, and many of these settings are organized in one app: System Preferences. You can access this app from the Apple menu, and it offers a plethora of options for customizing your Mac’s environment, and many of its features.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to use the System Preferences app, how to customize its display, and how to change essential settings for your Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Use Your iPad as Your Mac’s Second Screen with Sidecar

One of the more useful features in macOS Catalina is Sidecar, which allows you to use your iPad as a second display for your Mac. This is practical if you want to work on a document on your iPad using the Apple Pencil, or if you want to be able to show something from your Mac to a colleague or client without them needing to look over your shoulder. And if you work on a laptop, having that additional screen space for occasional or even regular usage can make your work a lot smoother.

In this article, I’ll show you how you can use Sidecar to extend your Mac’s display.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #133: Don’t Share Your Apple ID (so a Friend Can Watch Apple TV+)

Getting a text message on an iOS device can crash your iPhone or iPad; but it can’t do any more harm than that. Apple has released a beta version of iOS with its coronavirus notification API, but Americans don’t trust tech companies. And we talk about Apple TV+, and how you should never share your Apple ID so friends can watch shows with your account.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Apple Watch Tips: 8 Things You Didn’t Know It Could Do

If you have an Apple Watch, you certainly know about its marquee features. It can track your activity and prod you to exercise more, using its three rings. You can use it to make and receive phone calls and text messages. And you can get notifications for calendar events, reminders, and updates from your favorite apps. You can use it for Apple Pay to quickly buy a cup of coffee or a book. You can use Siri to have your watch react to your voice commands and provide you with information. And you can check the time, with one of dozens of customizable watch faces, where you can add complications to provide data and quick access to apps and features.

But the Apple Watch – which is more a wrist computer than a timepiece – has lots of great features you may not know about. In this article, I’m going to highlight eight things you probably didn’t know you could do with your Apple Watch. Some use built-in apps and features, and some use third-party apps. Read on to find out how to make your Apple Watch do a lot more.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.