24 thoughts on “Do You Need the New iMac Pro?

  1. Not until software makers force me too by requiring multiple core etc, games or apps, which always forced obsolescence in the past 20 years.

    I’m still running CS5 Photoshop and Bridge in High Sierra, with multiple layers and actions at no slow down on my 17,1 iMac w 24gb of RAM, which is a long time dream.

  2. Not until software makers force me too by requiring multiple core etc, games or apps, which always forced obsolescence in the past 20 years.

    I’m still running CS5 Photoshop and Bridge in High Sierra, with multiple layers and actions at no slow down on my 17,1 iMac w 24gb of RAM, which is a long time dream.

  3. Probably won’t need it, I had a cheesegrater, but then moved on to an iMac in early 2014, that same computer is still going strong. The SSD and 32 GB Ram helps this machine stay fast. I only do print and web graphics, no video.

  4. Probably won’t need it, I had a cheesegrater, but then moved on to an iMac in early 2014, that same computer is still going strong. The SSD and 32 GB Ram helps this machine stay fast. I only do print and web graphics, no video.

  5. We (local government access channel) are planning on getting one to try it out until the modular MacPro arrives. Our 2013 MacPros are getting long in the tooth and it’d be nice to have some more processing power and RAM for our editing/motion graphics needs. Not sure yet if the iMac Pro is the answer, but we’ll try it out.

  6. We (local government access channel) are planning on getting one to try it out until the modular MacPro arrives. Our 2013 MacPros are getting long in the tooth and it’d be nice to have some more processing power and RAM for our editing/motion graphics needs. Not sure yet if the iMac Pro is the answer, but we’ll try it out.

  7. It’s obviously a niche device, tailored to video editing. When you spend $50-100K per 8K video camera and many thousands more for lenses, HDMI monitors, lighting, etc., $10-15K for a computer amortized over 3 years is nothing.

    But for that kind of niche, it looks pretty great, even as a stop-gap until the real Pros arrive. If only my parents hadn’t taught me how to do arithmetic, which stopped me from ever buying lottery tickets, it would be easier to fantasize…

  8. It’s obviously a niche device, tailored to video editing. When you spend $50-100K per 8K video camera and many thousands more for lenses, HDMI monitors, lighting, etc., $10-15K for a computer amortized over 3 years is nothing.

    But for that kind of niche, it looks pretty great, even as a stop-gap until the real Pros arrive. If only my parents hadn’t taught me how to do arithmetic, which stopped me from ever buying lottery tickets, it would be easier to fantasize…

  9. No, I don’t want anything that costs so much and I can’t take it apart and upgrade it. My current laptop is a 2012 MBP, the last Jobs machine that is upgradable. If I’m going to have a throwaway, it’s going to be a Chromebook.

  10. No, I don’t want anything that costs so much and I can’t take it apart and upgrade it. My current laptop is a 2012 MBP, the last Jobs machine that is upgradable. If I’m going to have a throwaway, it’s going to be a Chromebook.

  11. If “Pro” means make money with the machine, why do people want to spend their time taking it apart and putting it back together with a new component or two?

    If a particular configuration no longer meets your needs, buy what you now need and sell the old one. (Remember, Mac hold their value very well.) It is called trading up and works very well. A new machine comes with all-new components and a new warranty. Good stuff if you rely on the machine to make money.

    Etc, etc.

    • You’re right, if a Pro is a business expense, just go to the IT department and get whatever you need. They’ll set it up with all necessary software and deliver it to you ready to run. That’s the best way to own one of these things.

  12. If “Pro” means make money with the machine, why do people want to spend their time taking it apart and putting it back together with a new component or two?

    If a particular configuration no longer meets your needs, buy what you now need and sell the old one. (Remember, Mac hold their value very well.) It is called trading up and works very well. A new machine comes with all-new components and a new warranty. Good stuff if you rely on the machine to make money.

    Etc, etc.

    • You’re right, if a Pro is a business expense, just go to the IT department and get whatever you need. They’ll set it up with all necessary software and deliver it to you ready to run. That’s the best way to own one of these things.

  13. My day job is as a software developer of Windows applications. When I got the job last year, I convinced the company to buy me a 27” iMac as my development machine. So I spend most of my time running Visual Studio under Parallels. I wonder if the iMac Pro would be appreciably faster at compiling.

  14. My day job is as a software developer of Windows applications. When I got the job last year, I convinced the company to buy me a 27” iMac as my development machine. So I spend most of my time running Visual Studio under Parallels. I wonder if the iMac Pro would be appreciably faster at compiling.

  15. In the Future – there will be NO Macs

    We see the writing on the wall every day. Apple is phasing out traditional computing as we know it. You are being carefully groomed for computing on watches, phones and tablets — mobile devices. That big rack of switches out in Cupertino is marked for judgement day. Some engineer will flick the switch that says “Today” and iPhone 4s and Leopard Macs will die. The pulse goes out over the nets. Screens go dim, then dark. The 5s will be next.

    My wife was just locked out of her iPhone. She mistakenly clicked yes to one of those updates. Went to download photos to the MacBook : “Please unlock your iPhone” …it was not locked … opened iTunes to back-up and sync as usual : “Please unlock your iPhone” …it was not locked.

    You cannot back up your iPhone until you update your Macbook they say. You guessed it: then it says “Sorry, this Macbook cannot be upgraded.” Slowly, step by calculated step, under the radar and behind closed doors, Apple is planning the demise of your old device, and the purchase of your new device. They are confident that if 22% of their installed base sticks with Apple and buys that new device, as planned, they’ll enjoy a 34% increase in revenue. They don’t give a crap about the rest of us. Never did.

    It was a fun, creative, profitable 35 years using Macs. In 2012 I moved all my business, office, Adobe and FileMaker over to this Macbook Pro. I still have an iMac running Tiger, and it runs perfectly — but that hasn’t been booted since I retired and sold the building in 2015. So after 16 Macs, when this one dies, I plan to get an iPad Pro and say Au revoir to Macs. I’d rather spend the money on my new hobby, yachting in the Florida keys!

  16. In the Future – there will be NO Macs

    We see the writing on the wall every day. Apple is phasing out traditional computing as we know it. You are being carefully groomed for computing on watches, phones and tablets — mobile devices. That big rack of switches out in Cupertino is marked for judgement day. Some engineer will flick the switch that says “Today” and iPhone 4s and Leopard Macs will die. The pulse goes out over the nets. Screens go dim, then dark. The 5s will be next.

    My wife was just locked out of her iPhone. She mistakenly clicked yes to one of those updates. Went to download photos to the MacBook : “Please unlock your iPhone” …it was not locked … opened iTunes to back-up and sync as usual : “Please unlock your iPhone” …it was not locked.

    You cannot back up your iPhone until you update your Macbook they say. You guessed it: then it says “Sorry, this Macbook cannot be upgraded.” Slowly, step by calculated step, under the radar and behind closed doors, Apple is planning the demise of your old device, and the purchase of your new device. They are confident that if 22% of their installed base sticks with Apple and buys that new device, as planned, they’ll enjoy a 34% increase in revenue. They don’t give a crap about the rest of us. Never did.

    It was a fun, creative, profitable 35 years using Macs. In 2012 I moved all my business, office, Adobe and FileMaker over to this Macbook Pro. I still have an iMac running Tiger, and it runs perfectly — but that hasn’t been booted since I retired and sold the building in 2015. So after 16 Macs, when this one dies, I plan to get an iPad Pro and say Au revoir to Macs. I’d rather spend the money on my new hobby, yachting in the Florida keys!

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