Evernote’s New Privacy Policy Lets Staff Read Customers’ Notes to ‘Improve the Service’ – Mac Rumors

Some users of Evernote have threatened to stop using the note-taking service after the company announced a new privacy policy scheduled to go into effect on January 24 that effectively allows employees to read customers’ notes.

I’ve been using Evernote for about six months, and I’ve found it to be the perfect tool for my information collection and storage. But this is making me re-think whether I want to continue using the service. I don’t store anything seriously confidential (such as credit card numbers) in Evernote, but there are things that are for my eyes only.

I really wish Apple Notes was better. For example, if I want to clip a web page to refer back to it, I can do this with Evernote and save the entire page; Notes only saves a link to it, together with a brief description.

I don’t want to use Microsoft OneNote, because its interface is only slightly more agreeable than that of a long-distance airplane. What other apps are as flexible as Evernote for storing information? (And please don’t tell me about some home-brew combination of apps and scripts; I need something simple, and something that integrates with macOS and iOS share sheets, and with IFTTT, if possible.)

Source: Evernote’s New Privacy Policy Lets Staff Read Customers’ Notes to ‘Improve the Service’ – Mac Rumors

20 thoughts on “Evernote’s New Privacy Policy Lets Staff Read Customers’ Notes to ‘Improve the Service’ – Mac Rumors

  1. I really love OneNote. The ability to run it on any OS and, in a pinch, access it on the web, plus the utilities for importing whole web pages in one click, the tagging, the excellent search. It’s just outstanding for storing long term research material.

    I use Simplenote on iOS and web/ResophNotes on Windows for real simple notes. All of them sync seamlessly.

  2. I really love OneNote. The ability to run it on any OS and, in a pinch, access it on the web, plus the utilities for importing whole web pages in one click, the tagging, the excellent search. It’s just outstanding for storing long term research material.

    I use Simplenote on iOS and web/ResophNotes on Windows for real simple notes. All of them sync seamlessly.

  3. Regardless of what a privacy policy states, if the data isn’t properly end-to-end encrypted, too many people can read your stuff. Rogue employees, rogue warrants, hackers, accidental ‘slips’ such as backup sets left publicly accessible-assuming that everything is wide open is realistic, not paranoid. Few companies put security high on the priority list, because it’s not cheap, and there are no real consequences when they screw up. If you don’t care about breaches, there’s not much point worrying about explicit employee access either. In their favor, Evernote is clear about what they’re doing–most companies aren’t.

    I don’t even trust iCloud even though it’s likely better security than average, and you can’t use Notes without it. You can turn on iCloud Drive, and keep notes on the device instead of in the cloud, but then there’s no way to sync. I’ve heard that Apple is working on full end-to-end encryption, and once that’s out and stable, I’ll be delighted to start using it.

    Until then, I use home webdav on a Filevaulted disk, and only use apps that can sync with webdav. For notes, I use Notebooks from Alfons Schmid. I like that everything is kept in standard file formats, so I’ll still be able to access things 20 years from now.

    Never having used Evernote, I don’t know if Notebooks would be a good replacement, but it can import whole webpages (as webarchives) if you install the bookmarklet. It lets you scribble into .pngs, knows markdown, can sort of do checklists and scheduling (easily ignored), syncs with webdav, dropbox and wifi. An in-app purchase lets you annotate pdfs but I don’t know how well. It handles share sheets well to the extent that I use them, and there are several options for sort order. There’s a desktop app, but I haven’t tried it, and I’ve heard that it doesn’t yet do nearly everything that the ios app does. The thing that actually annoys me most is that it insists on separating folders from files instead of interleaving them properly. I should probably put in a feature request.

  4. Regardless of what a privacy policy states, if the data isn’t properly end-to-end encrypted, too many people can read your stuff. Rogue employees, rogue warrants, hackers, accidental ‘slips’ such as backup sets left publicly accessible-assuming that everything is wide open is realistic, not paranoid. Few companies put security high on the priority list, because it’s not cheap, and there are no real consequences when they screw up. If you don’t care about breaches, there’s not much point worrying about explicit employee access either. In their favor, Evernote is clear about what they’re doing–most companies aren’t.

    I don’t even trust iCloud even though it’s likely better security than average, and you can’t use Notes without it. You can turn on iCloud Drive, and keep notes on the device instead of in the cloud, but then there’s no way to sync. I’ve heard that Apple is working on full end-to-end encryption, and once that’s out and stable, I’ll be delighted to start using it.

    Until then, I use home webdav on a Filevaulted disk, and only use apps that can sync with webdav. For notes, I use Notebooks from Alfons Schmid. I like that everything is kept in standard file formats, so I’ll still be able to access things 20 years from now.

    Never having used Evernote, I don’t know if Notebooks would be a good replacement, but it can import whole webpages (as webarchives) if you install the bookmarklet. It lets you scribble into .pngs, knows markdown, can sort of do checklists and scheduling (easily ignored), syncs with webdav, dropbox and wifi. An in-app purchase lets you annotate pdfs but I don’t know how well. It handles share sheets well to the extent that I use them, and there are several options for sort order. There’s a desktop app, but I haven’t tried it, and I’ve heard that it doesn’t yet do nearly everything that the ios app does. The thing that actually annoys me most is that it insists on separating folders from files instead of interleaving them properly. I should probably put in a feature request.

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