Hey Apple, Fix This: it’s time to give up thinness for a bigger battery

Apple has a problem with batteries. In fact, the problem is so serious that the company had to make a radical decision in the latest update of macOS: they removed the battery time indicator. This appeared when you clicked the Battery menu extra in your menu bar, and it displayed an estimate of how much battery time was remaining on your laptop. Apple claimed this was removed because it was inaccurate; yet that indicator had been present on OS X for as long as I remember.

What suddenly made it inaccurate? The fact that many users are seeing far less than the 10 hours of battery life that Apple advertises with the new MacBook Pro? It wasn’t just Consumer Reports that saw this problem; lots of users and reviewers have seen it as well.

Read the rest of the article on Macworld.

8 thoughts on “Hey Apple, Fix This: it’s time to give up thinness for a bigger battery

  1. I completely agree. The problem also shows up on the iPhone and iPad, where once again, I would rather have more battery, at the cost of a small increase in weight and thickness. The most bizarre manifestation of Apple’s thinness mania is the iMac. They have compromised power, performance, and features to produce an ever-thinner case, on a computer that I never look at from the side. I would be much happier if my iMac was an inch thicker, and let me use that space for additional internal storage, more memory, and perhaps an expansion card.

    • I never bought the “thinness” of the iMac. It’s not like it matters on a desktop Mac, and it’s not that think, since it’s tapered. I have one, I’m typing this on it now. I can’t see how thin it is.

  2. I completely agree. The problem also shows up on the iPhone and iPad, where once again, I would rather have more battery, at the cost of a small increase in weight and thickness. The most bizarre manifestation of Apple’s thinness mania is the iMac. They have compromised power, performance, and features to produce an ever-thinner case, on a computer that I never look at from the side. I would be much happier if my iMac was an inch thicker, and let me use that space for additional internal storage, more memory, and perhaps an expansion card.

    • I never bought the “thinness” of the iMac. It’s not like it matters on a desktop Mac, and it’s not that think, since it’s tapered. I have one, I’m typing this on it now. I can’t see how thin it is.

  3. Apple could certainly increase the battery capacity, but not as much as most people think. FAA rules allow up to 100WH for a lithium battery installed in a device for either checked baggage or carry on. If a traveller gets explicit permission from the operator (not sure whether this is the carrier or the pilot), she can have up to 160WH installed in a device. This would certainly be limited to very few large batteries per flight. No battery larger than 160WH (2 gr of lithium) is permitted on passenger flights at all.

    The new 15″ MacBook Pro has a 76 WH battery, so in principle they could increase it by about 30%, but not more. I hope they do, but I think the wildly different results for different people doing similar things is more urgent.

    Apple also has to account for how much lithium is on a single flight during shipping. If they use larger batteries, they probably won’t be able to carry as many per flight, which would make waiting periods longer (leading to other complaints), not to mention lower profits, or more likely, even higher prices.

  4. Apple could certainly increase the battery capacity, but not as much as most people think. FAA rules allow up to 100WH for a lithium battery installed in a device for either checked baggage or carry on. If a traveller gets explicit permission from the operator (not sure whether this is the carrier or the pilot), she can have up to 160WH installed in a device. This would certainly be limited to very few large batteries per flight. No battery larger than 160WH (2 gr of lithium) is permitted on passenger flights at all.

    The new 15″ MacBook Pro has a 76 WH battery, so in principle they could increase it by about 30%, but not more. I hope they do, but I think the wildly different results for different people doing similar things is more urgent.

    Apple also has to account for how much lithium is on a single flight during shipping. If they use larger batteries, they probably won’t be able to carry as many per flight, which would make waiting periods longer (leading to other complaints), not to mention lower profits, or more likely, even higher prices.

  5. Even though MacBook battery could not be increased that much, what about iPhone iPad? They both should become thicker to host a larger battery.

  6. Even though MacBook battery could not be increased that much, what about iPhone iPad? They both should become thicker to host a larger battery.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.