Hey Apple, Fix This: Let us choose the apps we want to use in iOS

Apple’s desktop and mobile operating systems provide a full suite of applications that allow you to do most of what you want without downloading any additional apps. You can browse the web, send and receive email, manage calendars and contacts, and much more, all with the stock apps included in macOS and iOS.

But on macOS, you have the choice to not use those apps. Say you want to use Microsoft Outlook instead of Apple Mail; you can make this change, and when you click a link to send an email, Outlook will open. Or if you want to use Chrome instead of Safari, the same thing will happen: URLs you click will open in Google’s browser.

In macOS Sierra, change the default web browser in the General pane of System Preferences. To change the default email client, go to Mail’s General preferences.
You can even change the default app to open any specific file type on the Mac. Say you work with plain text files, but have a text editor you prefer over Apple’s TextEdit. You can change this so every time you double-click a .txt file, it opens with your selected app. To do this, select a file, press Command-I, then expand the Open With section if it’s not already expanded. Click the popup menu and select the app you want to use, then click Change All.

But iOS offers no such option.

Read the rest of the article on Macworld.

4 thoughts on “Hey Apple, Fix This: Let us choose the apps we want to use in iOS

  1. HEAR! HEAR!

    It has been 10 years, certainly not all with apps… but with the quality of 3rd party productivity apps, and more so the LACK of quality and QA focus from Apple on their apps, the inability for users to set URL Scheme handlers just reflects more poorly on Apple every year.

    See here, Apple management: you keep telling us you have the best engineers and the best programmers on the planet, fine, OK, then have the courage of principle to stand up and COMPETE against your competition. Your refusal to do so looks more cowardly each release. I see fear, lock in, not confidence.

    • Exactly. I was referring to what Apple calls ‘legacy apps’ -: indeed, third party apps that with just about any upgrade make them unable to run, causing Apple Users like myself to keep an older, outdated Mac to read and write in it’s created (and sometimes copywritten so) format. You can optioN all you want on those files – but the (for example) Creative Suite, once your older computer isn’t capable of running the newest version, so you deny any upgrades (only to find they upgraded it anyway) remotely just because it shared the first 4 of the ISP your newer Mac does.
      That’s more than I paid for the computer – by 3K.

  2. HEAR! HEAR!

    It has been 10 years, certainly not all with apps… but with the quality of 3rd party productivity apps, and more so the LACK of quality and QA focus from Apple on their apps, the inability for users to set URL Scheme handlers just reflects more poorly on Apple every year.

    See here, Apple management: you keep telling us you have the best engineers and the best programmers on the planet, fine, OK, then have the courage of principle to stand up and COMPETE against your competition. Your refusal to do so looks more cowardly each release. I see fear, lock in, not confidence.

    • Exactly. I was referring to what Apple calls ‘legacy apps’ -: indeed, third party apps that with just about any upgrade make them unable to run, causing Apple Users like myself to keep an older, outdated Mac to read and write in it’s created (and sometimes copywritten so) format. You can optioN all you want on those files – but the (for example) Creative Suite, once your older computer isn’t capable of running the newest version, so you deny any upgrades (only to find they upgraded it anyway) remotely just because it shared the first 4 of the ISP your newer Mac does.
      That’s more than I paid for the computer – by 3K.

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