How iTunes Match and Apple Music Work Together

If you have an iTunes Match subscription, and you’ve updated to the latest version of iTunes (12.2), you may have had a bit of a surprise. There is, actually, scant mention of iTunes Match in the iTunes interface, and it can be a bit confusing trying to figure out how iTunes Match works in the new iTunes landscape.

If you’ve signed up for Apple Music, then it can be even more confusing, since Apple Music also matches tracks the way iTunes Match does. Here’s an overview of how these two services work in iTunes and on iOS, and how they work together.

Read the rest of the article on Macworld.

2 thoughts on “How iTunes Match and Apple Music Work Together

  1. Kirk,

    Before today, I am not an iTunes Match subscriber and am currently not a iTunes Match subscriber.

    I decided to try out Apple Music. I downloaded the update across my iOS devices and then iTunes 12.2. It asked me to enable iCloud Music Library which I did. It scanned through my library and then it was done. I checked back on my devices and my music was there for all devices.

    I want clarity on some things.

    For one, is it true that once you match your existing music with iCloud Music Library, the files themselves on the PC or Mac become DRM-locked? Or is it true that when you download content from the Apple Music that you have matched in the first place come back as DRM?

    For example, let’s say I upload Abbey Road by The Beatles which is DRM free. It’s now on the iCloud Music library. Let’s say I want to download Abbey Road onto my PC, Mac, or iOS device, can you confirm that Abbey Road will be fully DRM locked or will it stay DRM free because it’s not part of the Apple Music service?

    Would it be different if I uploaded “Shake It Off” by Taylor Swift which is on the service. The track is DRM free. It’s uploaded on the iCloud Music library. If I wanted to download “Shake It Off” the track will come back DRM locked because it’s part of the Apple Music catalog? Correct or mistaken?

    Do all these problems only happen with iTunes Match subscribers?

    A major reason that I noticed the album art to be completely different might have to (I’m guessing) with the method of service.

    When music begins to get matched:

    1) Music information is gathered from your library.
    2) Music is matched through the iTunes, not through the Apple Music catalog. Which means the methods might be crossing themselves and confusing the service altogether.
    3) When its completed, it’s in your iCloud Music library. Here, the music match information and any uploaded songs are sent from iTunes where in the software and activity bar it clears states it’s match tracks from iTunes and are being sent to the iCloud Music library. In other words, it’s sent from iTunes to Apple Music. Once it lands at Apple Music, album art is messed up in part in my opinion, it’s a stretch, because of the Apple Music catalog and iTunes catalog being different, they’ve crossed differently.

    Other explanations as well happen to lay with how badly matching isn’t being done with iTunes and Apple Music. Think about having to match hundreds of tracks one by one. The process can go too fast or fail to read files correctly. That’s where the problem seems to lay.

    Johnny

  2. Kirk,

    Before today, I am not an iTunes Match subscriber and am currently not a iTunes Match subscriber.

    I decided to try out Apple Music. I downloaded the update across my iOS devices and then iTunes 12.2. It asked me to enable iCloud Music Library which I did. It scanned through my library and then it was done. I checked back on my devices and my music was there for all devices.

    I want clarity on some things.

    For one, is it true that once you match your existing music with iCloud Music Library, the files themselves on the PC or Mac become DRM-locked? Or is it true that when you download content from the Apple Music that you have matched in the first place come back as DRM?

    For example, let’s say I upload Abbey Road by The Beatles which is DRM free. It’s now on the iCloud Music library. Let’s say I want to download Abbey Road onto my PC, Mac, or iOS device, can you confirm that Abbey Road will be fully DRM locked or will it stay DRM free because it’s not part of the Apple Music service?

    Would it be different if I uploaded “Shake It Off” by Taylor Swift which is on the service. The track is DRM free. It’s uploaded on the iCloud Music library. If I wanted to download “Shake It Off” the track will come back DRM locked because it’s part of the Apple Music catalog? Correct or mistaken?

    Do all these problems only happen with iTunes Match subscribers?

    A major reason that I noticed the album art to be completely different might have to (I’m guessing) with the method of service.

    When music begins to get matched:

    1) Music information is gathered from your library.
    2) Music is matched through the iTunes, not through the Apple Music catalog. Which means the methods might be crossing themselves and confusing the service altogether.
    3) When its completed, it’s in your iCloud Music library. Here, the music match information and any uploaded songs are sent from iTunes where in the software and activity bar it clears states it’s match tracks from iTunes and are being sent to the iCloud Music library. In other words, it’s sent from iTunes to Apple Music. Once it lands at Apple Music, album art is messed up in part in my opinion, it’s a stretch, because of the Apple Music catalog and iTunes catalog being different, they’ve crossed differently.

    Other explanations as well happen to lay with how badly matching isn’t being done with iTunes and Apple Music. Think about having to match hundreds of tracks one by one. The process can go too fast or fail to read files correctly. That’s where the problem seems to lay.

    Johnny

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