How to Prepare Your Digital Legacy

“In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes,” to quote the famous Benjamin Franklin. We’re all going to die one day, as fatalistic as it may sound, but we also live in the digital age in which information can live forever.

Keeping your information safe and secure in the digital age is an extremely important responsibility–as well as creating a plan for your digital legacy.

You may have life insurance and plans for how your finances will be handled after your death, especially if you have a family, own a home, or have a mortgage. Yet few people think about their digital legacy: This includes documents and photos you have created, but also content that you have purchased online, and the posts you have made on Facebook or other websites.

What will happen to all the digital content you own after you die? Will a loved one be able to access your Dropbox folder to get copies of your personal documents? And how can your next of kin get access to your iCloud account to save copies of your photos? What will happen to your music collection when you pass? These are all great questions that I’ll answer in this article, including your options for securing your digital assets and passing them on to your family.

Here’s how to prepare your digital legacy and ensure that your loved ones can access your information left online after you die.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.

4 thoughts on “How to Prepare Your Digital Legacy

  1. Great article. I’ve had some personal experience with thiis recently. A couple of things I will add:

    access to the deceased person’s phone is pretty vital. Learn their passcode.
    if you have access the their email and their phone, you can recover pretty much any password for any other account.

  2. Great article. I’ve had some personal experience with thiis recently. A couple of things I will add:

    access to the deceased person’s phone is pretty vital. Learn their passcode.
    if you have access the their email and their phone, you can recover pretty much any password for any other account.

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