How To: Set a Long Passcode on an iOS Device

On the most recent episode of The Committed Podcast, we were discussing security and iPhones, and one of my co-hosts, Ian Schray, mentioned not using a four-digit passcode, that it’s too insecure to use such a simple passcode. I realized after the recording that a lot of people may not know how to set up a longer passcode. Hence, this how-to.

First, why would you want to use a long passcode? If you have a device that offers Touch ID, you’ll use your fingerprint most of the time, and only need to type a passcode when you restart the device, or when Touch ID doesn’t work. The latter only happens when my hands are sweaty; Touch ID has always been very reliable for me, though I know many people who have problems with it.

Your four-digit passcode isn’t very strong, and someone could try a bunch of combinations, unless you have activated a setting (in Settings > Passcode Lock) to erase the device after ten failed passcode attempts. So you might want something more robust.

To set a long passcode, open the Settings app, tap Touch ID & Passcode, and then enter your passcode. Scroll down to where you see a toggle for Simple Passcode, and turn this off.

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Enter your passcode to approve this change, then you’ll see a screen allowing you to enter a passcode. Unlike the standard screen, which only displays numbers, this one shows a full keyboard, and you can choose a passcode with letters, numbers, and even symbols and punctuation.

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Type the new passcode, and then tap Next; type it again to confirm, and you’ll have a long passcode. Now, whenever you access your device with a passcode, you won’t be limited to just a number pad; you’ll have a full keyboard, and can enter your passcode.

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You can still use Touch ID, but whenever you do need to enter a passcode, it will be more secure.

4 thoughts on “How To: Set a Long Passcode on an iOS Device

  1. If the long passcode is entirely numeric, then you’ll get the numeric keypad on the lockscreen, which makes it easier to type. You’ll have to increase the number of digits to make it more secure, but I find entering a 10-digit numeric passcode to be pretty fast and less prone to mistyping.

  2. If the long passcode is entirely numeric, then you’ll get the numeric keypad on the lockscreen, which makes it easier to type. You’ll have to increase the number of digits to make it more secure, but I find entering a 10-digit numeric passcode to be pretty fast and less prone to mistyping.

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