iWant: iTunes Sync Screen Should Display the Size of Playlists, Albums, etc.

My iTunes library is much larger than the contents of any of my iOS devices. To sync music, I choose the option to sync selected playlists, albums, artists and genres. And I only sync playlists; it’s a lot easier to create playlists for the artists whose music I want to sync than scroll through a list of more than 5,000 albums.

But there’s a lack of information in the iTunes sync screen. When I want to add some new music, and need to cull some older tunes to make room, the only way I can find out what to remove is trial and error. For example, this morning, I wanted to add a playlist with a half-dozen albums from a band I like. I checked the playlist, and clicked Sync, but iTunes then told me that I needed about 300 MB more free space. But the capacity bar at the bottom of the window didn’t tell me I was out of space; it’s not worked well since iTunes 12.

So, I needed to remove some music. In the Playlists list, I can uncheck some playlists that I don’t want to sync any more.

Itunes sync playlists

The problem is that, when I uncheck a playlist, I have no idea how much space it takes up. iTunes should display this information to the right of the playlist’s name. For example, the 77 May playlist is 1.6 GB; if I knew how much space it took up, I might remove that one to make room. Instead, I had to uncheck some other playlists, then click Sync, to find if there was enough space.

Apple does need to fix the capacity bar issue; that’s the bar at the bottom of the window that shows how much space is used by different types of media or apps. It no longer updates in real time, and often shows free space that is either much more or much less than what’s really on the device. But the most useful information would be precise sizes of playlists, albums, etc.

But, then, of course, that sync this morning took forever, as is the case these days with iTunes…

14 thoughts on “iWant: iTunes Sync Screen Should Display the Size of Playlists, Albums, etc.

  1. I’m in even more of a quandary. My library is primarily lossless but I have it set to convert to 256kbps AAC when it syncs. I use playlists too. Through T&E I increase the playlist sizes until it fits, as I know I can get about twice as much on the device versus the size of the Smart Playlist.

    • Good point. I have some lossless tracks, and some 320 kbps MP3s, and I have them down-converted to 256 as well. So that throws off the size even more.

  2. I’m in even more of a quandary. My library is primarily lossless but I have it set to convert to 256kbps AAC when it syncs. I use playlists too. Through T&E I increase the playlist sizes until it fits, as I know I can get about twice as much on the device versus the size of the Smart Playlist.

    • Good point. I have some lossless tracks, and some 320 kbps MP3s, and I have them down-converted to 256 as well. So that throws off the size even more.

  3. Hey Kirk

    I’m totally with you on this issue …

    I’d also like to add that Apple needs to change the way to view what playlist a particular track is part of – as mentioned recently by another user. Right now you have to go through the awkward process of Control Clicking on each track & then scrolling way down a long list of menu items to finally discover the associated playlist. This is a ridiculous procedure if you’re really serious about using playlists.

    I believe a better solution would be to display this information in the Get Info dialog that opens when you select a track and press Command-i. This dialog is where you’d expect to find something so important as what playlist a track belongs to.

    • Yes, that would be good. Though I’m not sure the Info window is the best place. That requires opening that window, and, most likely, switching tabs in it. I wish there were some better way to get that info, though.

  4. Hey Kirk

    I’m totally with you on this issue …

    I’d also like to add that Apple needs to change the way to view what playlist a particular track is part of – as mentioned recently by another user. Right now you have to go through the awkward process of Control Clicking on each track & then scrolling way down a long list of menu items to finally discover the associated playlist. This is a ridiculous procedure if you’re really serious about using playlists.

    I believe a better solution would be to display this information in the Get Info dialog that opens when you select a track and press Command-i. This dialog is where you’d expect to find something so important as what playlist a track belongs to.

    • Yes, that would be good. Though I’m not sure the Info window is the best place. That requires opening that window, and, most likely, switching tabs in it. I wish there were some better way to get that info, though.

  5. Hi. Isn´t that why 77 May is 1.6 GB, why removing it, the gained data might not be that big, since some title on that playlist might also be included on other lists such as 74 Winterland.

    • In this case, no, because it is May 77 only. But it’s true that you’ll have playlists which contain songs that are in other playlists. It complicates it slightly, but some info is better than none at all, especially because the capacity bar is no longer reliable.

  6. Hi. Isn´t that why 77 May is 1.6 GB, why removing it, the gained data might not be that big, since some title on that playlist might also be included on other lists such as 74 Winterland.

    • In this case, no, because it is May 77 only. But it’s true that you’ll have playlists which contain songs that are in other playlists. It complicates it slightly, but some info is better than none at all, especially because the capacity bar is no longer reliable.

  7. Hi. (I noticed a typo in my comment)

    Hi. Isn´t it also that while 77 May is 1.6 GB, when removing it, the gained space might not be that big, since some titles on that playlist might also be included on other lists such as 74 Winterland.

  8. Hi. (I noticed a typo in my comment)

    Hi. Isn´t it also that while 77 May is 1.6 GB, when removing it, the gained space might not be that big, since some titles on that playlist might also be included on other lists such as 74 Winterland.

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