Life After Cancer: How the iPhone Helped Me Achieve a Healthier Lifestyle — MacStories

I’ve been struggling to get back in shape after chemo.

Since being diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma (Stage IV) in late 2011, my life changed. Beyond the psychological and emotional consequences of how cancer affected me, my family, and my relationships, it is undeniable and abundantly clear that cancer took its toll on me from a physical perspective.

Last year, I decided to regain control of my body, my life habits, and my health. I started tracking everything I could about my activities, my exercise routine, the food I ate, and the time I spent working with my iPad instead of walking, sleeping, or enjoying time with my family. Since then, I’ve made a decision to not let cancer and its consequences define me any longer.

I want to be healthier, I want to eat better, and I want to take the second chance I was given and make the most of it. What started as an experiment has become a new daily commitment to improve my lifestyle and focus.

And it wouldn’t be possible without my iPhone.

A very moving story from Federico Viticci. He explains how Apple’s Health app helps him aggregate lots of different data streams, but also points out that he doesn’t rely on it to view the data. One of my gripes with the Health app is that its display is poor. The article is a great overview of the many apps you can use to track and enhance your health.

But, above all, Federico tells a great tale of beating cancer.

Life After Cancer: How the iPhone Helped Me Achieve a Healthier Lifestyle — MacStories.

8 thoughts on “Life After Cancer: How the iPhone Helped Me Achieve a Healthier Lifestyle — MacStories

  1. The article seems to insinuate that the culmination of ‘apple’ is the well-being of it’s consumers.
    My view, without any ire or irony attached, is that apples’ intention is to make money (albeit, more elegantly than HBSC).
    I don’t know if that makes me more cynical than apple, or the article.
    You could easily swap iPhone for Android, or Apple for Google.
    whatever… good luck to you…

    • The article seems to insinuate that the culmination of ‘apple’ is the well-being of it’s consumers.
      My view, without any ire or irony attached, is that apples’ intention is to make money (albeit, more elegantly than HSBC).
      I don’t know if that makes me more cynical than apple, or the article.
      You could easily swap iPhone for Android, or Apple for Google.
      whatever… good luck to you…

  2. The article seems to insinuate that the culmination of ‘apple’ is the well-being of it’s consumers.
    My view, without any ire or irony attached, is that apples’ intention is to make money (albeit, more elegantly than HBSC).
    I don’t know if that makes me more cynical than apple, or the article.
    You could easily swap iPhone for Android, or Apple for Google.
    whatever… good luck to you…

    • The article seems to insinuate that the culmination of ‘apple’ is the well-being of it’s consumers.
      My view, without any ire or irony attached, is that apples’ intention is to make money (albeit, more elegantly than HSBC).
      I don’t know if that makes me more cynical than apple, or the article.
      You could easily swap iPhone for Android, or Apple for Google.
      whatever… good luck to you…

  3. Hey Kirk, it might have been too early in the AM when I read this, but until I got the bottom of your post I thought the whole post was about your personal battle with Cancer. So glad to hear this is not the case!

  4. Hey Kirk, it might have been too early in the AM when I read this, but until I got the bottom of your post I thought the whole post was about your personal battle with Cancer. So glad to hear this is not the case!

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