Mubi: The Movie Streaming Service Where Less Is More

Everyone knows the Netflix shuffle. That’s when you want to watch a movie, and spend a half hour browsing through the same stuff you’ve been seeing for months, just in new lists, and end up not finding anything to watch. You then go read a book.

While Netflix does have some good content, it, and Amazon Prime Video, and other services, don’t make it easy to find what you want. In fact, it’s extremely difficult to weed out what you don’t want to watch so it doesn’t keep showing up. Netflix, for example, has been changing the graphics for movies and TV shows so you think they’re new. I really wish there was a way to mark something as Don’t Ever Show Me This Again Because There’s No Way In The World That I Would Ever Want To Watch It (ie, The Grand Tour).

Mubi is a movie streaming service that takes a totally different approach. They add one movie a day, and each movie lasts for thirty days, then it’s gone. The films available won’t appeal to everyone – they are art house, festival, and foreign films – but if you like that kind of movie, this carefully-curated selection is what you need.

Recently, Mubi has had several movies by Wim Wenders, two by Spike Lee, a number of films by Korean director Hong Sang-Soo, some interesting French films, and more. I’ve found that I’m watching three or four movies a month, which makes this service more than worthwhile, and the fact that there is only one film a day means that I’m not overwhelmed by the selection. And there are no super hero movies (at least I haven’t seen any yet).

If you’re into this kind of cinema, and want to have a limited selection of interesting movies, check out Mubi.

0 thoughts on “Mubi: The Movie Streaming Service Where Less Is More

  1. Thanks Kirk. Your description of the ‘shuffle’ hits the nail on the head. We were about to close our Netflix account for lack of use, when the Sunday Times recommended a movie — “Close” if you are interested — which is on Netflix but has never been advertised to us (at least, not recognizably).

    Netflix et. al. are supposed to run algorithms to serve up more of what you want and less of what you don’t want. Obviously, that’s not working very well.

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