My Kafkaesque nightmare with the iPhone Upgrade Program | Macworld

“The issue, I learned after a couple of days of phone calls with Citizens’s PR, was that the address on my Experian credit report didn’t match the address I provided, because I had recently moved.”

All due respect, but, duh.

I agree that it’s frustrating when a purchase is declined and they don’t tell you why. I’ve seen this happen a few times when my address didn’t exactly match the address associated with my credit or debit card. I have a four-line address in the UK, and some web forms only allow three lines (name, address, city/postcode), and sometimes it’s hard to figure out how to squeeze everything in the right way. But if you’d moved, you’d probably remember that your credit card, or credit report, didn’t have the right address.

Source: Macworld.

10 thoughts on “My Kafkaesque nightmare with the iPhone Upgrade Program | Macworld

  1. That story had a happy ending, but people need to be aware that Apple’s upgrade program involves being approved for credit by a bank. The credit system and the credit bureaus in the U.S. are massively inefficient. Fixing problems can be difficult. Apple is merely dealing with a broken system, but the article explains the pitfalls in a very graphic way. It’s not something Apple can fix.

    Peace,
    Gene

    • No, it’s the same as if you hadn’t changed your address with your credit card company. When you move, you generally change your address. Apple isn’t dealing with a broken system at all; this is just someone who forgot to change his address.

  2. That story had a happy ending, but people need to be aware that Apple’s upgrade program involves being approved for credit by a bank. The credit system and the credit bureaus in the U.S. are massively inefficient. Fixing problems can be difficult. Apple is merely dealing with a broken system, but the article explains the pitfalls in a very graphic way. It’s not something Apple can fix.

    Peace,
    Gene

    • No, it’s the same as if you hadn’t changed your address with your credit card company. When you move, you generally change your address. Apple isn’t dealing with a broken system at all; this is just someone who forgot to change his address.

  3. I have excellent credit, but was denied repeatedly by Citizen One no matter which credit card I used. In hindsight, I think it was because I have a “fraud alert” on my credit (I am supposed to get a phone call seeking approval, but there was no call.) I have read that some other people with fraud alerts were also not able to sign up for Apple ‘s iPhone upgrade program.

    • That’s a totally different story than having the wrong address. What exactly is a “fraud alert?” They thought the card number had been obtained by someone using it fraudulently?

      • A fraud alert requires a business or bank to contact you prior to issuing a loan or credit card. The credit reporting companies offer this service. (See http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0275-place-fraud-alert) Having had my identity stolen once before, I have a fraud alert on my credit (which should make it difficult for identity thieves to open up fake accounts in my name). I had assumed that Citizen One would call my phone number, which is on file with the fraud alert and which is the usual practice whenever I get a new credit card, car loan, etc. But Citizen One never called. When I was not approved by Citizen One, I mentioned to the Apple staff that the fraud alert might be the reason why. The Apple salesperson checked on this, but said they had no information on fraud alerts. I ended up buying the phone outright instead.

  4. I have excellent credit, but was denied repeatedly by Citizen One no matter which credit card I used. In hindsight, I think it was because I have a “fraud alert” on my credit (I am supposed to get a phone call seeking approval, but there was no call.) I have read that some other people with fraud alerts were also not able to sign up for Apple ‘s iPhone upgrade program.

    • That’s a totally different story than having the wrong address. What exactly is a “fraud alert?” They thought the card number had been obtained by someone using it fraudulently?

      • A fraud alert requires a business or bank to contact you prior to issuing a loan or credit card. The credit reporting companies offer this service. (See http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0275-place-fraud-alert) Having had my identity stolen once before, I have a fraud alert on my credit (which should make it difficult for identity thieves to open up fake accounts in my name). I had assumed that Citizen One would call my phone number, which is on file with the fraud alert and which is the usual practice whenever I get a new credit card, car loan, etc. But Citizen One never called. When I was not approved by Citizen One, I mentioned to the Apple staff that the fraud alert might be the reason why. The Apple salesperson checked on this, but said they had no information on fraud alerts. I ended up buying the phone outright instead.

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