Neil Young Gives In, Allows Streaming of His Music

As reported on Hyperbot, Neil Young is allowing his music to be streamed in that execrable quality that he has vociferously derided for so long, MP3. All 57 of his albums are now available to stream on Tidal, and they will presumably soon be on the other music streaming services.

Perhaps Young was motivated by his failed attempt to launch his own high quality streaming service Pono. Or maybe its just that he’s set to release a new album called EARTH recorded during his recent Monsanto Years tour.

Neil, oh Neil, you’ve spouted so much BS about the quality of digital music, and you’ve gone and sold out…

10 thoughts on “Neil Young Gives In, Allows Streaming of His Music

  1. We should never be surprised by artists selling out. Even writers sell out sometimes to promote products – hard to believe 😉 But selling out has nothing to do with the supposition that astute listeners can’t discern and appreciate the difference between digital recordings produced at varying bit depths, or even recordings produced and consumed completely outside the digital realm. It is a “bit” shortsighted to disparage the entire body of knowledge accumulated by recording engineers over many years, arriving at a conclusion that the streamed 256 kbps file is the ideal, unsurpassed delivery method for hearing recorded audio. It’s not bad if you’re out and about with jackhammers and aircraft drowning out your noise canceling Beats, but there is a reason why I import my CD’s to iTunes using lossless if not full resolution – it sounds better. If it didn’t, Apple would still be selling 128 kbps files. Also, is there any reason why we don’t assume that infrastructure improvements will eventually have us all streaming 1411 kbps or better, anyway – making the mobile data providers, and Neil, happier? Thanks for the thought provoking blog, Kirk.

  2. We should never be surprised by artists selling out. Even writers sell out sometimes to promote products – hard to believe 😉 But selling out has nothing to do with the supposition that astute listeners can’t discern and appreciate the difference between digital recordings produced at varying bit depths, or even recordings produced and consumed completely outside the digital realm. It is a “bit” shortsighted to disparage the entire body of knowledge accumulated by recording engineers over many years, arriving at a conclusion that the streamed 256 kbps file is the ideal, unsurpassed delivery method for hearing recorded audio. It’s not bad if you’re out and about with jackhammers and aircraft drowning out your noise canceling Beats, but there is a reason why I import my CD’s to iTunes using lossless if not full resolution – it sounds better. If it didn’t, Apple would still be selling 128 kbps files. Also, is there any reason why we don’t assume that infrastructure improvements will eventually have us all streaming 1411 kbps or better, anyway – making the mobile data providers, and Neil, happier? Thanks for the thought provoking blog, Kirk.

  3. I’m so jaded these days it doesn’t surprise me that he took this step. His service and player failed and he’s either in the process of or has completed his divorce and may want to make some more money. Maybe I’m too old at 64 but I’ve lost a lot of faith in celebrities and their positions on issues. Pete Seeger and Prince seem to be the only people I could appreciate and they are gone.

  4. I’m so jaded these days it doesn’t surprise me that he took this step. His service and player failed and he’s either in the process of or has completed his divorce and may want to make some more money. Maybe I’m too old at 64 but I’ve lost a lot of faith in celebrities and their positions on issues. Pete Seeger and Prince seem to be the only people I could appreciate and they are gone.

  5. Hard to see how it was ever a quality issue as I can purchase any of his records in the iTunes store. The quality of items sold in the iTunes store and items streamed on Apple Music is the same, right?

  6. Hard to see how it was ever a quality issue as I can purchase any of his records in the iTunes store. The quality of items sold in the iTunes store and items streamed on Apple Music is the same, right?

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