No internet connection? Be prepared for iTunes to drive you crazy

It’s no secret that the iTunes Store is so tightly integrated into the iTunes application that it’s almost as though they were Siamese twins. As your local copy of iTunes has become increasingly linked to Apple’s cloud, it has become dependent on internet access.

But what if you don’t have internet access? Your connection is down; or your router is broken; or you simply don’t want your computer to connect to the internet? Well, iTunes will remind you of this, over and over and over. In such a case, iTunes will pop up an alert every single time you play a song and every time one song finishes and another one begins.

Read the rest of the article on Macworld.

14 thoughts on “No internet connection? Be prepared for iTunes to drive you crazy

      • Not all the time, but still frequently. Frequent enough to annoy, not frequently enough to totally ditch iTunes… yet. I have my media MacMini hooked up to our TV and stereo in the den and when I am listening to music sometimes it will just stop to alert me that it is not connected. I don’t use wifi with this Mac and I have it turned off. So I know that isn’t it.

        I did figure out that the music that kept trying to stream from iCloud, even though _I_ don’t use it, is from old grandfathered Smart Playlists. Once I deleted the old Playlist and made anew one everything was fine.

        But iCloud seems to always find some way to come back to haunt me. I just assume it is part of the Apple experience these days.

        Joe

      • Not all the time, but still frequently. Frequent enough to annoy, not frequently enough to totally ditch iTunes… yet. I have my media MacMini hooked up to our TV and stereo in the den and when I am listening to music sometimes it will just stop to alert me that it is not connected. I don’t use wifi with this Mac and I have it turned off. So I know that isn’t it.

        I did figure out that the music that kept trying to stream from iCloud, even though _I_ don’t use it, is from old grandfathered Smart Playlists. Once I deleted the old Playlist and made anew one everything was fine.

        But iCloud seems to always find some way to come back to haunt me. I just assume it is part of the Apple experience these days.

        Joe

  1. Yikes. Good timing on the article, I’m planning to catch up on updates today, so now I know to skip iTunes. I block a lot of Apple connections with Little Snitch, so even when I’m connected, this would be hell.

    Apple really needs a better beta testing department. One that includes real people with only dial up connections, or who need really large fonts, and more. Possibly due to their excessive secrecy, It seems like they only test in house, with pre-presbyopic youngsters using gigabit ethernet.

  2. Yikes. Good timing on the article, I’m planning to catch up on updates today, so now I know to skip iTunes. I block a lot of Apple connections with Little Snitch, so even when I’m connected, this would be hell.

    Apple really needs a better beta testing department. One that includes real people with only dial up connections, or who need really large fonts, and more. Possibly due to their excessive secrecy, It seems like they only test in house, with pre-presbyopic youngsters using gigabit ethernet.

  3. This is not new for iTunes. Apple likes to “keep in touch” with what we’re doing with their devices. Some might call it “data collection” or even “spying”. They have devised many features in their “free” software to help us deliver our usage information to them via the internet – strictly for their product improvement purposes, of course. 😉 I fondly recall setting up my very first iMac way back when, which I tried to initialize without any internet service, and a message came onscreen: “You have chosen not to connect to the internet – then why did you buy this iMac?”. I laughed, and shortly thereafter purchased and discovered the joys of the internet! Believe it, Apple may or may not be selling your data, but they are VERY interested in what you’re doing with their products. I replaced Safari, which seems to be intrinsically linked with iTunes, and in the past I often used to unplug my internet connection when strictly listening to music, because I had a sneaking (yes paranoid, and unsubstantiated) suspicion that Apple was delivering 256 kbps streams to me over the internet instead of my own full resolution library versions. Today, I am an Apple Music subscriber, so I have dumbed my ears down to accept 256 kbps as “high quality music”. Yes, Kirk – I’m one of those snobs 🙂

  4. This is not new for iTunes. Apple likes to “keep in touch” with what we’re doing with their devices. Some might call it “data collection” or even “spying”. They have devised many features in their “free” software to help us deliver our usage information to them via the internet – strictly for their product improvement purposes, of course. 😉 I fondly recall setting up my very first iMac way back when, which I tried to initialize without any internet service, and a message came onscreen: “You have chosen not to connect to the internet – then why did you buy this iMac?”. I laughed, and shortly thereafter purchased and discovered the joys of the internet! Believe it, Apple may or may not be selling your data, but they are VERY interested in what you’re doing with their products. I replaced Safari, which seems to be intrinsically linked with iTunes, and in the past I often used to unplug my internet connection when strictly listening to music, because I had a sneaking (yes paranoid, and unsubstantiated) suspicion that Apple was delivering 256 kbps streams to me over the internet instead of my own full resolution library versions. Today, I am an Apple Music subscriber, so I have dumbed my ears down to accept 256 kbps as “high quality music”. Yes, Kirk – I’m one of those snobs 🙂

  5. It’s not just iTunes that’s doing this. The “new and improved” movies app, now called the TV app won’t let me play my Great Courses movies that I have purchased and downloaded. These are legally purchased. I install these files onto my iPad. They are located in the TV Shows part of the TV app. I can’t play these lectures without an online connection, which just sucks. I would load up my courses on my device and watch them on a plane, or in Airplane or Do Not Disturb mode, but now it won’t work anymore without an online connection.

    This is not good at all. Plus, Apple removed the edit function in the TV app. So now, to remove movie files on the go, I have to go to Settings > General > Manage Storage > TV app > then delete files.

    Why did they remove this functionality from a perfectly good working app?

    The new Apple is turning into a bad apple.

    • I just tested this, and I have no problem playing my ripped movies without network access. But I also updated my iPad to the latest version of iOS, which was released yesterday.

  6. It’s not just iTunes that’s doing this. The “new and improved” movies app, now called the TV app won’t let me play my Great Courses movies that I have purchased and downloaded. These are legally purchased. I install these files onto my iPad. They are located in the TV Shows part of the TV app. I can’t play these lectures without an online connection, which just sucks. I would load up my courses on my device and watch them on a plane, or in Airplane or Do Not Disturb mode, but now it won’t work anymore without an online connection.

    This is not good at all. Plus, Apple removed the edit function in the TV app. So now, to remove movie files on the go, I have to go to Settings > General > Manage Storage > TV app > then delete files.

    Why did they remove this functionality from a perfectly good working app?

    The new Apple is turning into a bad apple.

    • I just tested this, and I have no problem playing my ripped movies without network access. But I also updated my iPad to the latest version of iOS, which was released yesterday.

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