PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 124: Food Photography with Lauren Caris Short

How do you make mouth-watering photos of food? This week we’re joined by Lauren Caris Short, author of the beautiful new book The Complete Guide to Food Photography to talk about what it takes to be a food photographer. Lighting, food styling, composition… photographing food is a multi-disciplined photo endeavor.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #255: Email Privacy: Apple Hide My Email and DuckDuckGo Email Protection

We take a deep dive into two email privacy protection features, from Apple and DuckDuckGo. We also give a few predictions for Apple’s Far Out event next week, look at cases where two-factor authentication isn’t enough, and discuss how macOS is actively scanning for malware; at least for 13 types of malware.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Which Is Better: Apple’s Hide My Email or DuckDuckGo Email Protection?

You give your email address to lots of websites and services. Sometimes you have to sign up for an account, or to receive a newsletter (often to get a one-time discount). Other times you may just want to access content on a website, like a white paper or ebook. Companies often collect email addresses in exchange for free content so they target you for potential sales.

But you don’t always want to give out your personal email address. After all, you know you might get spammed, and that it is sometimes difficult to unsubscribe from newsletters. If you just need one-time access to a content site and never want to hear from them again, you can sometimes use a disposable email service. However, many content sites block addresses from disposable mail services because they want your real address.

A great alternative is to use a unique, per-service, anonymous email address that forwards to your main email account. Two such services are Apple’s Hide My Email—which is built into macOS, iOS, and iPadOS—and DuckDuckGo Email Protection.

In this article, we’ll look at these two services and discuss the pros and cons of each one.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Sync Scrivener for iPad and iPhone Projects Using Dropbox, iTunes, or the Finder

Scrivener for iPad and iPhone is meant to work both independently and in conjunction with Scrivener for Mac or Windows. You can create projects, write, edit, and compile on your iPad or iPhone, but you can also sync projects between your mobile device and desktop computer so you can work on both devices.

If you want to sync projects between devices, there are two ways to do so. You can use iTunes (on Windows) or the Finder (on Mac) to copy projects to and from your mobile devices. Or you can use Dropbox to sync your projects as you work on them.

In this article, I’ll look at both of these methods, and explain the pros and cons of each one.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Wildlife photographer David duChemin on finding your voice

David duChemin is a photographer, author, and educator, known for both his humanitarian work as well as his nature and wildlife photography, both on land and underwater. As with most image makers who travel to create their work, COVID-19 put the brakes on many of his projects, but also gave him time to rethink how he approaches photography—and change camera systems.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #254: Which Is More Secure: Face ID, Touch ID, or a Passcode?

Apple has announced the date for its iPhone event; it’s on September 7, and we discuss what we could see. We also look at more mobile apps that inject javascript in web pages in their in-app browsers; are they doing this to collect data? And we look at Face ID, Touch ID, and a passcode to determine which is more secure.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Which Is More Secure: Face ID, Touch ID, or a Passcode?

In an upcoming article, we’ll look at three security concerns that Apple is aware of—one of which is that twins and siblings can sometimes fool Face ID into unlocking their look-alike’s iPhone or iPad. This is common enough that auto-reply emails from Apple’s security team include a long section about how Face ID works and why it can be defeated in those circumstances.

When Apple introduced Face ID, the company told us that it was secure. Apparently it’s secure enough that financial institutions trust it for authentication, both with Apple Pay and with many banking apps. The same is true for Touch ID. But how secure are these technologies, really?

In this article, we’ll look at each of the three methods of authenticating on an iPhone or iPad: Face ID, Touch ID, and a passcode. And we’ll discuss which is the most secure, and why.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.