Which iPad Is Best for You?

In 2010, Apple released the first iPad. Available in one size (9.7″), with three storage options (16, 32, or 64 GB), a Wi-Fi only version was released first, with a Wi-Fi and cellular model following shortly after. At the time, this ground-breaking device was competing with netbooks (remember them?) for primacy in the lightweight/portable device market. It didn’t take long for the iPad, and the tablet in general, to flourish.

Over the years, Apple has iterated the iPad many times, with nearly two dozen different models in many sizes.

It used to be easy to choose an iPad. When there were just a couple of models available, all you needed to choose was the color and how much storage you wanted. But things have changed. Nowadays, you have multiple options to choose from, each with varying configurations; it’s not so simple to know right off the bat which iPad is best for you.

If you want an iPad today, there are four different models, each with different feature sets. There are five different sizes, and the base price varies from as low as $329 to as much as $1099 (these prices are for Wi-Fi only, with the base storage amount, and without any of the accessories that make the new iPad Pro models interesting). You can choose models that offer Wi-Fi, or both cellular and Wi-Fi, and even 5G on some models, and there are as many as five color options, depending on the model.

Based on your needs, how can you tell which iPad you should get? In this article, I’m going to look at the different iPad models and recommend which iPad is best for you, depending on how you plan to use it.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple Announces New iMacs, iPads, AirTags, and More

After the first flurry of Macs running Apple’s own processors, in November of last year, Apple has made another step toward transitioning the entire Mac line to these new chips. The new iMac, announced yesterday, not only features Apple’s own M1 processor, but is the first Mac to benefit from a redesign along with this upgrade. At the same time, Apple announced new iPad Pros, AirTags, and a refresh of the Apple TV 4K.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Use Folders and Texts to Power Up the Scrivener Binder

When you’re working on a project in Scrivener, the Binder is your organizational tool. You create folders and texts, and use them to structure you work. You could just have a single text, and write like Jack Kerouac on a scroll, but then you wouldn’t get the benefit of being able to rearrange chapters, sections, and scenes in the Binder. Understanding how to use the Binder is the key to working with a Scrivener project.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Episode 90: Bryan William Jones on How We See

Retinal neuroscientist Bryan William Jones joins us this week for a fascinating discussion about how our eyes, brains, and technology work together to create and record images. Can we apply the understanding of the way we see to the way the camera sees?

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #183: 500 Million More Reasons to Talk About Facebook

Scammers have a new technique for delivering malware: using online contact forms. A couple of browsers are nixing Google’s FLoC ad tracking technology. The FBI has been playing white hat hacker. And e talk about Facebook, and especially the “off-Facebook activity” that tracks you across the internet.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The Next Track, Episode #207 – Yes. I mean, no, really, but Yes.

Setting out to discuss the 1971 album by Yes, The Yes Album, Doug and Kirk end up discussing all of Yes’s core output, released over a period of a couple of years, that the band – or what’s left of it – still plays 50 years later. Sort of.

Help support The Next Track by making regular donations via Patreon. We’re ad-free and self-sustaining so your support is what keeps us going. Thanks!

Support The Next Track.

Find out more at The Next Track website, or follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast.

How to remove GPS location data from photos on iPhone or Mac

It’s great to have location data stored in your photos. This allows you to sort through your photo library and find all your photos from your last vacation, or from favorite sites you like to visit. For some photos, like that one of the Eiffel Tower, it’s obvious where you’ve taken them. But you may not want people to be able to figure out where all your photos were taken. For example, you probably don’t want location data in photos you’ve taken in your back yard showing up on social media, allowing people to find exactly where you live.

It’s easy to remove location data when sharing photos from your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Here’s how.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #182: Facebook, Google, and Stolen iPhones

Facebook leaks 500 million user records, Google is testing a new replacement for cookies to track users, and we explain how to check if that used iPhone you want to buy is stolen.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.