The Next Track, Episode #184 – TJ Connelly, Boston Sports DJ

TJ Connelly is a sports DJ: he provides “scores” for live sporting events, such as baseball, football, and hockey games. Since the lockdown, he’s been out of work, and he has been focusing his attention on Uncertain Times, a daily streaming radio show. We talk with him about what it means to score live sports, and how his streaming show is reconnecting him with real radio.

Help support The Next Track by making regular donations via Patreon. We’re ad-free and self-sustaining so your support is what keeps us going. Thanks!

Support The Next Track.

Find out more at The Next Track website, or follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast.

The Zen of Everything Podcast, Episode 26: Zen Books

“Zen is a special transmission outside the scriptures, not depending on words and letters.” With that in mind, Jundo and Kirk discuss Zen books: how to read them, what to read, and when to burn them.

Find out more at the Zen of Everything website and at Treeleaf Zendo.

Photos makes it very difficult to find RAW+JPEG photos – The Robservatory

Unfortunately, I wasn’t so smart in the past, and I imported many RAW and RAW+JPEG photos to Photos—and I don’t need the RAW versions at all. Some are pure RAW, and these I can easily find and fix (export, convert to JPEG, re-import). Unfortunately, most are in the RAW+JPEG format, and that’s a problem: Once such photos are in Photos, there’s absolutely no way to find them—which means there’s no easy way to remove them.

My friend Rob wants to get rid of raw files in his Apple Phots library, and this isn’t easy. I’m surprised that it’s so hard to find raw files; as he explains, when you use a jpeg + raw pair of photos, the Photos app only “sees” the one you’ve chosen to edit.

He found a sort-of solution to his problem, but one that won’t work for most people. I’d love an option to remove the photo that isn’t selected for editing in Photos.

Source: Photos makes it very difficult to find RAW+JPEG photos | The Robservatory

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 68: Revisiting Geotagging with HoudahGeo 6.0

With photographers finding themselves with unexpected time on their hands at home, it’s a great time to update the location data in the photos in your library. Pierre Bernard joins us again to talk about the new features in his Mac app HoudahGeo 6.0, indulging our lazy photographic habits, and… how HoudahGeo supports scuba divers?

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

How to Shoot Video with an iPhone

Shooting video with an iPhone is easy, but you may not know all the many options available on your device. You can choose the resolution and frame rate of your videos, shoot slow motion or time-lapse videos, and you can zoom and use the different lenses on your iPhone, if your model has multiple cameras.

But you can also take stills while you’re shooting video, and with third-party video apps, you have tight control over focus and exposure, making the iPhone good enough to shoot a feature film. (And it’s been done.)

In this article, I’m going to explain the many options available on an iPhone for shooting video. (And note that most of what I describe also applies to the iPad.)

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #136: Tips for using your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch

We look at some practical tips for getting more out of your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch. We take a close look at System Preferences, discuss using the iPad as a second screen for your Mac; and a handful of tips for making the Apple Watch more efficient. Also, Josh and Kirk disagree about Microsoft’s choice to flag two spaces after a period in Word as an error.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The Next Track, Episode #183 – Composer and Pianist Timo Andres on Concertizing at Home

Timo Andres is a young composer and pianist, nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 2016. We discuss his music, and how he missed his first solo recital at Carnegie Hall du to the coronavirus lockdown, and decided to make home videos of all the works to present his program to the public. (Apologies for the audio; we made some mistakes when recording.)

Help support The Next Track by making regular donations via Patreon. We’re ad-free and self-sustaining so your support is what keeps us going. Thanks!

Support The Next Track.

Find out more at The Next Track website, or follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast.

How to Clear Your Safari Browser Cache on Mac

To make your browsing experience more efficient, web browsers cache data, which means they store files on your computer. They do this so when you return to a website, you don’t need to download all if its elements. For example, if you regularly view a web page that contains a number of graphics, not downloading those graphics will save time, and save bandwidth, both for you and for the web host.

Sometimes, however, you may want or need to delete that cache. This is a first-line troubleshooting technique when you are having difficulty displaying web pages. Different browsers have different methods for doing this, and Apple’s Safari makes this complicated, for some reason. Here’s how you can delete your Safari browser cache.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Improve your Zoom, Skype, or FaceTime call experience

For many people who are working from home for the first time, Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, and other video-conferencing services have become essential communication tools. People use these for meetings, but also to keep in touch with friends and family. These apps are easy to use, but the way you experience them can be jarring if you’re not used to this sort of communication.

Improving the experience in video-conferencing is both about how you see and hear others, and how they see and hear you. The success of meetings and calls with these apps depends on everyone involved in a call or meeting ensuring that their audio and video is as good as possible.

In this article, I’m going to give you some tips to improve your experience on Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, and other video-conferencing apps.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.