14 thoughts on “Photo: Cloister

    • We did. We were returning from Bournemouth (Bob Dylan concert Thursday night), and stopped at Salisbury, Sarum Hill, and Avebury (photo I posted yesterday). I had visited the area 15 years ago, and it was nice to be back. Lovely part of the country, lots to see. I wanted to visit Stonehenge again, but given the weather, and the cost of getting in, we decided against it. That will be for another day.

    • We did. We were returning from Bournemouth (Bob Dylan concert Thursday night), and stopped at Salisbury, Sarum Hill, and Avebury (photo I posted yesterday). I had visited the area 15 years ago, and it was nice to be back. Lovely part of the country, lots to see. I wanted to visit Stonehenge again, but given the weather, and the cost of getting in, we decided against it. That will be for another day.

  1. I enjoy your photos, Kirk — nice today to see someone buying a camera and using it! (Gotta admit I use iPhone more).

    Your beautiful shot of the Salisbury cloisters leads me to ask: Don’t you want to adjust the horizontals and verticals slightly? Perhaps it’s being a retired architect that makes me want to do that.

    I tried to do so on your photo with PTLens software but right off one is reminded it doesn’t work with Alpha Channel images like email. I’ve used PTLens for years and like it a lot.

    Going to Google to check that the software is still out there, I see it is but also that PCMag says it’s old hat and that DxO and Adobe Lightroom are better. My understanding is that DxO isn’t Mac friendly and I’m still thinking about moving from iPhoto to Lightroom.

    • It’s tough, because of the angle of the shot. I straightened it so the horizontal line between of the lawn is straight, but obviously nothing else will be straight because of the skew in the lens. It also looks like the far wall isn’t straight because it may have settled. So if I straightened that line, the lawn line wouldn’t be straight, and if the wall itself isn’t straight, then I really shouldn’t correct it.

      It also looks as though the far wall is not a uniform height; if it was, it would be lower at the left, because I’m shooting straight at the right end of the wall. It’s actually interesting, because there are a lot of things askew, but they all seem to be due to the architecture.

      • Didn’t think of that but I bet you’re right — over time, lots of it, things have moved a bit out of square.

        If you did make an adjustment other than turning the picture frame slightly, what software did you use? A while back you raised the subject of photo editing and I wonder what you decided.

        By the way, on my wall is a pair of photos inside Ely Cathedral taken by a friend of mine, a longtime architectural photographer never shy to use Photoshop, and now I notice they aren’t square either. I’ve no doubt that was his choice.

        • I just used Apple’s Photos to tweak the brightness a bit, and to adjust the angle and crop. I also use Acorn for some things, but I haven’t really looked any further, since my brief experience with Lightroom, which wasn’t to my taste. I have a couple of other apps I bought from the App Store, for specific purposes, that I’ve dabbled with. One, Tonality, I used in the Gargoyles photo I posted. It’s an app that gives you a variety of black and white options, kind of like Instagram filters, but with more flexibility.

  2. I enjoy your photos, Kirk — nice today to see someone buying a camera and using it! (Gotta admit I use iPhone more).

    Your beautiful shot of the Salisbury cloisters leads me to ask: Don’t you want to adjust the horizontals and verticals slightly? Perhaps it’s being a retired architect that makes me want to do that.

    I tried to do so on your photo with PTLens software but right off one is reminded it doesn’t work with Alpha Channel images like email. I’ve used PTLens for years and like it a lot.

    Going to Google to check that the software is still out there, I see it is but also that PCMag says it’s old hat and that DxO and Adobe Lightroom are better. My understanding is that DxO isn’t Mac friendly and I’m still thinking about moving from iPhoto to Lightroom.

    • It’s tough, because of the angle of the shot. I straightened it so the horizontal line between of the lawn is straight, but obviously nothing else will be straight because of the skew in the lens. It also looks like the far wall isn’t straight because it may have settled. So if I straightened that line, the lawn line wouldn’t be straight, and if the wall itself isn’t straight, then I really shouldn’t correct it.

      It also looks as though the far wall is not a uniform height; if it was, it would be lower at the left, because I’m shooting straight at the right end of the wall. It’s actually interesting, because there are a lot of things askew, but they all seem to be due to the architecture.

      • Didn’t think of that but I bet you’re right — over time, lots of it, things have moved a bit out of square.

        If you did make an adjustment other than turning the picture frame slightly, what software did you use? A while back you raised the subject of photo editing and I wonder what you decided.

        By the way, on my wall is a pair of photos inside Ely Cathedral taken by a friend of mine, a longtime architectural photographer never shy to use Photoshop, and now I notice they aren’t square either. I’ve no doubt that was his choice.

        • I just used Apple’s Photos to tweak the brightness a bit, and to adjust the angle and crop. I also use Acorn for some things, but I haven’t really looked any further, since my brief experience with Lightroom, which wasn’t to my taste. I have a couple of other apps I bought from the App Store, for specific purposes, that I’ve dabbled with. One, Tonality, I used in the Gargoyles photo I posted. It’s an app that gives you a variety of black and white options, kind of like Instagram filters, but with more flexibility.

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