The study claims that 16% of millennials — defined as 14-34 year-olds in this case — have music-streaming subscriptions, compared to 6% of Generation X consumers (35-55 year-olds) and 3% of Baby Boomers (over-55s).

This isn’t surprising, but you’d think the people running the survey might have reflected a bit as to why. The article says:

Electric Jukebox’s survey also claimed that 42% of respondents still see CDs and radio as “easier” than music-streaming, while only 18% think streaming is easier.

Millennials buck that trend (44% of 18-24 year-olds think streaming is easier) while older people are even more likely to still find CDs and radio a friendlier experience.

Uh, okay. How about, the older you are, the more likely you are to have a music collection on CD and not see the need to spend a monthly tithe to play music? That seems pretty obvious to me. Most of the people I know who care about music, and who are “older,” have music collections, and are also less interested in today’s popular music.

Source: Research claims streaming ‘black hole’ beyond millennials

18 thoughts on “

  1. Spotify with Optus free music stream offer is enough for me to discover new music. No need to pay for streaming at all. Ad is acceptable.

  2. Spotify with Optus free music stream offer is enough for me to discover new music. No need to pay for streaming at all. Ad is acceptable.

  3. I think you’re absolutely right, Kirk. And while I’m at it, let me add that your recent links such as to Om Malik in the NewYorker have been great.

  4. I think you’re absolutely right, Kirk. And while I’m at it, let me add that your recent links such as to Om Malik in the NewYorker have been great.

  5. I only stream to hear a record before I go buy either the CD, via iTunes or just download it from Freegal via the Library. I’m lucky I live in Los Angeles right by Amoeba so I have access to tons of reasonably priced music. I don’t want to stream because I don’t want to go without my music if the connection drops and I don’t want to pay every month for something I don’t own. I buy music and my collection–currently 27,237 songs–is just fine by me!

  6. I only stream to hear a record before I go buy either the CD, via iTunes or just download it from Freegal via the Library. I’m lucky I live in Los Angeles right by Amoeba so I have access to tons of reasonably priced music. I don’t want to stream because I don’t want to go without my music if the connection drops and I don’t want to pay every month for something I don’t own. I buy music and my collection–currently 27,237 songs–is just fine by me!

  7. Streaming’s greatest appeals is that it helps the listener discovery new music.

    But most people don’t feel the need to “discover” new music after their early 30s.

    http://www.avclub.com/article/new-study-shows-people-stop-listening-new-music-33-218752

    This study rang true for me. My purchases trailed off when I hit 35. At 45, I like sampling new music (and I have several streaming subscriptions), but very little of the new stuff “sticks.” I still prefer the music I loved as a teenager in the 1980s. My dad, who’s 83, listens to 78 rpm country/bluegrass singles he listened to in the 1950s–even more, now that we’ve digitized them.

    I think that streaming is unlikely to catch on among older (over 35) listeners for precisely this reason: we have what we like, we don’t generally seek much more, and radio is a perfectly adequate way to sample what’s new and popular.

    • Yep! Especially True if once you were 40-something, you now prefer to collect and listen to classical music.

  8. Streaming’s greatest appeals is that it helps the listener discovery new music.

    But most people don’t feel the need to “discover” new music after their early 30s.

    http://www.avclub.com/article/new-study-shows-people-stop-listening-new-music-33-218752

    This study rang true for me. My purchases trailed off when I hit 35. At 45, I like sampling new music (and I have several streaming subscriptions), but very little of the new stuff “sticks.” I still prefer the music I loved as a teenager in the 1980s. My dad, who’s 83, listens to 78 rpm country/bluegrass singles he listened to in the 1950s–even more, now that we’ve digitized them.

    I think that streaming is unlikely to catch on among older (over 35) listeners for precisely this reason: we have what we like, we don’t generally seek much more, and radio is a perfectly adequate way to sample what’s new and popular.

    • Yep! Especially True if once you were 40-something, you now prefer to collect and listen to classical music.

  9. I am a boomer. I have a large vinyl collection, a reasonably sized CD collection, and about 8500 digital files in my IT library. That library far surpasses the scope and diversity of any streaming service, and is connected to my car system with an ipod. Unbeatable. While there are a few new things to preview, I stick with the older stuff. Far superior. Kirk, you’re right again!

  10. I am a boomer. I have a large vinyl collection, a reasonably sized CD collection, and about 8500 digital files in my IT library. That library far surpasses the scope and diversity of any streaming service, and is connected to my car system with an ipod. Unbeatable. While there are a few new things to preview, I stick with the older stuff. Far superior. Kirk, you’re right again!

  11. Well, I’m 68, and an enthusiastic streamer. I’ve dabbled with other services, including Apple Music, but always come back to Spotify. One of the main reasons, apart from sheer convenience, is that I discover new music all the time. Often, despite what the quoted study (largely bullshit IMHO) says, it’s music from since I was 33. That’s 35 years’ worth, after all, and it would be a brave man who would write it all off as not worth a listen. Sometimes it’s music from before I was born. Sometimes it’s music from my first 33 years that I missed at the time or had forgotten, or remember perfectly but feel like hearing. It’s all there on Spotify – how can that not be worth 10 bucks a month? I’ve ditched all my CDs (more room for books!), and have my last couple of hundred vinyl albums in storage merely because I’m sentimentally attached to them.

    Most of this happens via the Sonos. As it happens, right now I’m not listening to Spotify but MixCloud, and a terrific jazz playlist currently playing Hank Mobley’s Straight Ahead from 1965.

    The economics of all this are problematic, to be sure. But for not far short of 60 years I spent thousands and thousands on recorded music on vinyl, cassette and CD. So I reckon I’m due a payment holiday for a while.

    • I’m a lifelong classical music collector, and although I’m in the age 50-plus cohort, I have fully embraced streaming! Why? Because of the ability to listen to multiple versions of my favorite works — something that would have cost well over $100/monthly if I were buying CDs or downloads — for a paltry 10 bucks a month! Plus, I get to audition of sorts of unfamiliar works that I would otherwise be reluctant to pull the trigger on and pay for the CD or download. But, now I’m more prone to buy new music (or new “old” music) that I’ve had a chance to “test drive”.

      Contrary to the article, most of what I’m listening to now is unfamiliar. I’ve even found the occasional new popular track to enjoy.

      One of the great features of the Apple Music or Spotify (paid) plans is the ability to download tracks via wi-fi to your computer or mobile device, and then listen at your leisure without burning through your wireless data quota. (That, plus you can chose near-cd quality bit rates.)

      Streaming presents a wonderful new way to enjoy music!

    • You’re an outlier. I know others like you, serious classical music fans, who delight in being able to listen to many versions of works. But in the broader scheme of things, people like that are quite rare.

  12. Well, I’m 68, and an enthusiastic streamer. I’ve dabbled with other services, including Apple Music, but always come back to Spotify. One of the main reasons, apart from sheer convenience, is that I discover new music all the time. Often, despite what the quoted study (largely bullshit IMHO) says, it’s music from since I was 33. That’s 35 years’ worth, after all, and it would be a brave man who would write it all off as not worth a listen. Sometimes it’s music from before I was born. Sometimes it’s music from my first 33 years that I missed at the time or had forgotten, or remember perfectly but feel like hearing. It’s all there on Spotify – how can that not be worth 10 bucks a month? I’ve ditched all my CDs (more room for books!), and have my last couple of hundred vinyl albums in storage merely because I’m sentimentally attached to them.

    Most of this happens via the Sonos. As it happens, right now I’m not listening to Spotify but MixCloud, and a terrific jazz playlist currently playing Hank Mobley’s Straight Ahead from 1965.

    The economics of all this are problematic, to be sure. But for not far short of 60 years I spent thousands and thousands on recorded music on vinyl, cassette and CD. So I reckon I’m due a payment holiday for a while.

    • I’m a lifelong classical music collector, and although I’m in the age 50-plus cohort, I have fully embraced streaming! Why? Because of the ability to listen to multiple versions of my favorite works — something that would have cost well over $100/monthly if I were buying CDs or downloads — for a paltry 10 bucks a month! Plus, I get to audition of sorts of unfamiliar works that I would otherwise be reluctant to pull the trigger on and pay for the CD or download. But, now I’m more prone to buy new music (or new “old” music) that I’ve had a chance to “test drive”.

      Contrary to the article, most of what I’m listening to now is unfamiliar. I’ve even found the occasional new popular track to enjoy.

      One of the great features of the Apple Music or Spotify (paid) plans is the ability to download tracks via wi-fi to your computer or mobile device, and then listen at your leisure without burning through your wireless data quota. (That, plus you can chose near-cd quality bit rates.)

      Streaming presents a wonderful new way to enjoy music!

    • You’re an outlier. I know others like you, serious classical music fans, who delight in being able to listen to many versions of works. But in the broader scheme of things, people like that are quite rare.

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