Round Smartwatches: You’re Doing It Wrong | WatchAware

But the benefit to a circular display is that the entire display can rotate without any data loss — just like the inside of a compass. This means that, once calibrated with your head-level as “north” (you are a star, after all!), the UI will always know where your smartwatch is in relation to your eyeballs.

Yes! That’s one of the first things I noticed when I got my Apple Watch. I can never really have the watch’s text at an angle where I can read it comfortably without stretching. If I hold my arm up to look at the Apple Watch, the display is skewed about 15 degrees from my north. What a great idea that would be, if the watch face rotated as you moved your arm, or if it were simply set it – using a manual setting – to be at the most comfortable viewing angle.

Source: Round Smartwatches: You’re Doing It Wrong WatchAware

2 thoughts on “Round Smartwatches: You’re Doing It Wrong | WatchAware

  1. I learned to read text at any angle, including upside down, before I left grade school. Perhaps this isn’t true for everyone, but how would I be able to read other people’s newspapers on the subway, if I couldn’t read text comfortably at varying angles??? I’m not the only one doing it, so I know the skill is widespread.

    As the linked article says, people seldom look at a regular watch with the dial aligned to their axis of view. However, that author is confused about compass use. If you are really trying to get a good directional reading with a compass, you often need to orient your arm to your body, rotate your body in relation to the earth, and frequently, do both of these things while moving to a different location, so that you can get on the correct axis or sight the bearing of the desired object. A smart watch that requires these kinds of moves won’t be very popular.

    I see the Apple Watch interface error at 90 degrees to the linked article, and most others. When you glance at a watch on your wrist, when you are typing, for example, it’s just a few degrees away from wide-screen, landscape mode that we are used to with every computer monitor. In my view, this is the orientation that apps, and Apple, should emphasize. Instead, everyone seems to be equating normal viewing to portrait orientation. Which requires a whole lot of wrist bending.

  2. I learned to read text at any angle, including upside down, before I left grade school. Perhaps this isn’t true for everyone, but how would I be able to read other people’s newspapers on the subway, if I couldn’t read text comfortably at varying angles??? I’m not the only one doing it, so I know the skill is widespread.

    As the linked article says, people seldom look at a regular watch with the dial aligned to their axis of view. However, that author is confused about compass use. If you are really trying to get a good directional reading with a compass, you often need to orient your arm to your body, rotate your body in relation to the earth, and frequently, do both of these things while moving to a different location, so that you can get on the correct axis or sight the bearing of the desired object. A smart watch that requires these kinds of moves won’t be very popular.

    I see the Apple Watch interface error at 90 degrees to the linked article, and most others. When you glance at a watch on your wrist, when you are typing, for example, it’s just a few degrees away from wide-screen, landscape mode that we are used to with every computer monitor. In my view, this is the orientation that apps, and Apple, should emphasize. Instead, everyone seems to be equating normal viewing to portrait orientation. Which requires a whole lot of wrist bending.

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