Shooting Photos in “Partial Color” Mode on the Fujifilm X100F

(As with all my articles about the Fujifilm X100F, I don’t know if this feature is available on some or all other Fujifilm cameras. I assume that it is present on the more recent models.)

You’ve certainly seen photos like this, where most of a photo is in black and white, but some elements are in color:

Partial color1

There are several ways to create a photo like this. You can shoot in black and white, then color the photo; you can shoot in color, select the items you want to keep in color, invert the selection, and change the rest to black and white; or you can use a neat feature on the X100F called Partial Color.

Here’s another example of the same location as above where I’ve selected the green option:

Partial color2

To access this feature, Drive button — just above the Menu button — and move down to Advanced Filter. Press that, then move down to the Partial Color options. There are six of them: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple. When in this mode – available only if you’re shooting JPEG – the camera will process your photos retaining just that color, and rendering the rest of the photo in black and white. Naturally, these colors are approximate, and you may notice some bleed if you’re shooting objects with colors that are close to the selected color, and it won’t look good if there are gradient-like colors in the shot. But it can be fun.

For example, in this shot, you can see that the camera sees parts of the bricks as red:

Partial color3

This is an interesting option, one that could easily be overdone, but that may work well for certain photos. Try it out.


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4 thoughts on “Shooting Photos in “Partial Color” Mode on the Fujifilm X100F

  1. One use would be to create a visual connection between two (or more) objects that would otherwise not immediately appear to have a relationship.

  2. One use would be to create a visual connection between two (or more) objects that would otherwise not immediately appear to have a relationship.

  3. Thank you for the suggestion. I bought this camera and I was completely unaware of this option. Your other suggestion of the bracketing film simulation bracketing was also excellent. Regards.

  4. Thank you for the suggestion. I bought this camera and I was completely unaware of this option. Your other suggestion of the bracketing film simulation bracketing was also excellent. Regards.

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