Should You Re-Rip Your Music?

This is not an existential question, but a very practical one. While it won’t apply to all your music, you might want to consider doing so for certain CDs.

Here’s what happened to me. I was listening to a recording of Bach’s Goldberg Variations by Robert Hill this morning, and noticed that there was a tiny hiccup between the tracks. With iTunes playing music gapless, since version 7.0, this shouldn’t have happened. But I suspected that it might have had something to do with the ripping: I had originally imported this CD under iTunes 5, a couple of years ago.

I thought the problem might have been in the original ripping, so I tried importing it again, and it plays fine. So, for some reason, even though iTunes “updated gapless playback information” for these tracks when version 7 came along, it didn’t do so correctly; or the actual rip was different back then. In any case, if you notice any problems like this, you might want to rerip the CDs that don’t sound perfect.

6 thoughts on “Should You Re-Rip Your Music?

  1. The only thing that gets in the way of sitting down and re-ripping a large
    number of discs is the amount of work needed to get the metadata right! I find it
    very rare that the online data available for classical CDs is accurate — or, if it’s
    theoretically accurate, rare that it’s set up the way I want it. I don’t know if I’m
    particularly fussy about metadata (always a possibility), but it’s taken me a while
    to get right and I hesitate to throw that amount of work out the window!

  2. The only thing that gets in the way of sitting down and re-ripping a large
    number of discs is the amount of work needed to get the metadata right! I find it
    very rare that the online data available for classical CDs is accurate — or, if it’s
    theoretically accurate, rare that it’s set up the way I want it. I don’t know if I’m
    particularly fussy about metadata (always a possibility), but it’s taken me a while
    to get right and I hesitate to throw that amount of work out the window!

  3. Rip your media with X-Lossless Decoder (XLD) which can compress to ALAC, AAC, MP3, FLAC or whatever. The point is, it is free and can perform completely secure ripping with reporting down to the individual atom jitter, duplicate byte error and the rest of them. It can generate CUE sheets and ripping logs as well. It is the Mac answer to EAC for Windows (it’s actually better). Cheers.

  4. Rip your media with X-Lossless Decoder (XLD) which can compress to ALAC, AAC, MP3, FLAC or whatever. The point is, it is free and can perform completely secure ripping with reporting down to the individual atom jitter, duplicate byte error and the rest of them. It can generate CUE sheets and ripping logs as well. It is the Mac answer to EAC for Windows (it’s actually better). Cheers.

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