Sony Releases an Audiophile SD Card, Because Reasons

Sony premiume sd cardSony has released an audiophile SD card, the SR-HXA, which apparently, according to The Verge, costs around $155, compared to anywhere from $30 to $50 for equivalent speed SD cards. But this one is touted as “producing less electrical noise,” and Sony has a graph to prove it:

Y SR HXA 001

Blue seems to be your average, everyday, cheap SD card, and red is the Sony SR-HXA. My guess is that this SD card also results in less jitter, especially in the essential frequency ranges that reproduce harmonics, and that it helps contribute to more lively music, and a broader soundstage.

You have to love this Google Translate version of the Japanese web page, with statements such as:

“General na ? holds an have grades one then ? wa capacity ya speed To I ? ta su pe t ku ga ensure Connecticut made me cry made me cry ba parts ya material ga Bian more Connecticut made me cry…”

Yes, it made me cry too.

6 thoughts on “Sony Releases an Audiophile SD Card, Because Reasons

  1. The advantages of the Google-translated Sony text are that its gibberish is more entertaining, less repetitive, and above all, more concise than other recent examples that you have highlighted. For example, the article that you linked about audio-grade Ethernet cables.

  2. The advantages of the Google-translated Sony text are that its gibberish is more entertaining, less repetitive, and above all, more concise than other recent examples that you have highlighted. For example, the article that you linked about audio-grade Ethernet cables.

  3. The reason the translation produces gibberish is because it’s translating from Chinese to English, but the source material is in Japanese. I’m not sure why, but Google Translate frequently auto-detects Japanese as Chinese. Manually changing the source language to Japanese produces a more intelligible (tho hardly perfect) translation.

    Japanese ≠ Chinese Can’t understand why this is so hard for you, Google.

  4. The reason the translation produces gibberish is because it’s translating from Chinese to English, but the source material is in Japanese. I’m not sure why, but Google Translate frequently auto-detects Japanese as Chinese. Manually changing the source language to Japanese produces a more intelligible (tho hardly perfect) translation.

    Japanese ≠ Chinese Can’t understand why this is so hard for you, Google.

  5. I have absolutely no problem separating narcissists from their money. They’ll probably thank you for it dahlings. I’m a little surprised the only comments were about the always reliable Google service.

  6. I have absolutely no problem separating narcissists from their money. They’ll probably thank you for it dahlings. I’m a little surprised the only comments were about the always reliable Google service.

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