The iPod at 20 – How the Portable Music Player Laid the Foundation for Today’s Apple

n 2001, Apple was just getting out of the rut it had been in for many years. Steve Jobs’ return in 1997 led to the iMac, released the following year, that changed the way people looked at personal computers. When the 1999 iMac came in “5 flavors,” computers could be fun.

Financially, the company was starting to come back from a fallow period. Microsoft’s $150 million investment in Apple, in 1997, partly a settlement of patent infringements, bolstered the company for a while, but Apple’s ambitions were big. Apple started selling products through the company’s own online store in November of that year, a decision that would prove profitable, leading to the juggernaut that is Apple’s current direct-to-customer retail machine.

2001 saw the introduction of iTunes (January), the creation of Apple retail stores (the first one opened in May), the introduction of Mac OS X, the biggest change to the Mac’s operating system in a decade (Mac OS X 10.0 was released in March, but the first truly viable version of OS X was 10.1, which came in September), and then, on October 23, 2001, Apple introduced the iPod.

This portable digital music player revolutionized personal computing, and helped Apple build the company as we know it today.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple Goes Pro in Second Homegrown Silicon Salvo

Apple has announced the second wave of Macs running Apple silicon, and has introduced two MacBook Pro models running faster chips than the M1 that Apple introduced last year. The company also announced third-generation AirPods, which offer spatial audio, and new colors for the HomePod mini. Apple announced that macOS Monterey will ship next week. And the company gave some clues about where it’s going in the coming years.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

The Complete Guide to Apple MagSafe Chargers, Cases, and Accessories

Apple’s new iPhones feature the MagSafe charging infrastructure, allowing them to charge without plugging a cable into the devices. While this is not technically “wireless” charging – the MagSafe charger still has a wire – this form of induction charging is practical and it means that you can charge multiple devices without cables.

MagSafe is also a new accessory category for Apple, with a number of different cases available, several chargers, a battery pack, and the MagSafe wallet, which lets you attach a slim leather wallet to your iPhone to carry credit cards or cash.

In this article, I’m going to tell you everything about MagSafe: how it works, what you can charge with it, and which MagSafe accessories are available.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Why doesn’t Apple want people to upgrade to iOS 15?

Apple released iOS 15 and iPadOS 15 on Monday, September 20, and, as usual, many people updated their iPhones, iPads, and iPod touches to the new operating systems. But unlike in the past, Apple is not pushing people to make the upgrade. For the first time, Apple is going to maintain the previous operating system for users who don’t want to upgrade. You can choose to remain on iOS 14, and still get essential security updates, if you’d rather not move to iOS 15. (When I mention iOS in this article, I also include iPadOS.) This is similar to the way Apple manages macOS; you can upgrade to the new version, or continue to receive security updates on the previous version.

While we’re only a few days into the new operating systems, it’s clear that fewer people are making the transition. In general, the uptake is pretty quick, but after two days, it seems that iOS 15 adoption is much lower than for iOS 14. Last year, in the first two days, 14.5% of users had updated, but this year, over the same period, only 8.5% of users had made the switch.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #206: Why Doesn’t Apple Want People to Upgrade to iOS 15?

There’s new Mac malware hiding in a terminal emulator app, an interesting Finder vulnerability, and Apple launches iCloud+. We also wonder why Apple isn’t prompting iOS users to upgrade to iOS 15

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Use the Find My App to Locate Friends, Apple Devices, and AirTags

Apple’s Find My app is a versatile tool for finding your friends, keeping track of your Apple devices, and locating lost items that you’ve protected with AirTags. You can find your lost iPhone, see where your keys are, if they’ve got an AirTag on them, and find that friend you’re supposed to meet in a busy shopping mall.

Find My is not only for finding items, but also for protecting your Apple devices. You can mark them as lost, and even erase them remotely, protecting your data. Here’s how to use the Find My app.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #205: Apple’s Consistent Iteration

Apple has patched two in-the-wild vulnerabilities, and you should update your devices right away. We look at the dangers of “corrupt my file” websites. And we discuss Apple’s new product announcements.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Use Hide My Email

With the next versions of macOS, iOS, and iPadOS, due to be released in the fall, Apple is introducing Hide My Email, which allows you to create random email addresses that forward to your iCloud email address. You can use them to register for websites, apps, and services, and delete them if you don’t want to be contacted any more.

Here’s how Hide My email works.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

On Apple and Headphone Jacks

“Courage,” said Phil Schiller, in 2016, when he announced that Apple was removing the headphone jack from the iPhone 7. I recall that, when I heard this, I was stunned by how a key Apple executive used this word in a marketing presentation. Courage was Rosa Parks not moving to the back of the bus; courage was Nelson Mandela spending 27 years in prison. Courage is not removing a technology that works in order to push people toward wireless headphones.

Apple and headphone jacks… I don’t know why this is something that is often problematic. Take, for example, the AirPods Max. I recently bought this headset, and, while it’s a Bluetooth headset, it can also be used plugged into a headphone jack (if you buy the $35 Lightning to 3.5 mm Audio Cable).

But there’s a problem. The lightning port on the AirPods Max is on the right. Traditionally, cables are on the left of headphones. And the headphone jack on the new iMac is on the left. So if I want to use this with my iMac, the cable will run accros my keyboard and get in the way. (On my previous iMac, the headphone jack was on the right side, on the back of the device.)

Yet on my MacBook Air – and pretty much every Mac laptop I can recall – the headphone jack is on the right. So if you have standard headphones, the cable will cross the keyboard on those devices.

Apple pays attention to small details in some areas, but not in this one. This is something that should be consistent, and take into account how headphones work.

Apple Announces New Features in iOS 15, iPadOS 15, and macOS Monterey

It’s a bumper year for new features in Apple’s operating systems, iOS 15, iPadOS 15, and macOS Monterey. Monday’s preview at the Worldwide Developer Conference lasted nearly two hours, with a wide range of features from Safari to Mail, and from productivity to privacy. Apple’s operating systems are getting a big update this fall, with more features that work together across devices, and refinements to key apps and features that could make using Apple devices smoother. Here’s an overview of what’s new.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.