Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #277: Credential Stuffing, Pig Butchering, Security Keys for Your Apple Account, and the New Mac mini

This week’s threats involve credential stuffing and pig butchering, and we examine whether you should use security keys to protect your Apple ID account, and why the new Mac mini is a maxi computer.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Apple’s 2023 Mac mini is a Mini Mac Studio

Apple’s Mac mini has always seemed like an outlier in the company’s computer line-up. Originally touted as an inexpensive, stripped-down Mac – it was BYODKM, or “bring your own display, mouse, and keyboard” – the Mac mini was marketed for a while to switchers, people moving from Windows to Mac.

Over the years, the Mac mini languished, and there was a fallow period when it seemed like it wouldn’t be updated. After an update in October 2014, it took four years for the Mac mini to be refreshed. But when Apple released Macs running the company’s own processors, the Mac mini was one of the first to get an M1 version, and, in January 2023, Apple started shipping an M2 model. Available with M2 and M2 Pro processors, the Mac mini is no longer the little computer that could, but now stands as a powerful desktop computer for everyone.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to protect your Apple ID account with Security Keys on iPhone, iPad, or Mac

Apple has just released macOS 13.2, iOS 16.3, and iPadOS 16.3. One of the new security features is the ability to protect your Apple ID account with a security key, a hardware device that acts as a second factor for two-factor authentication.

This robust addition to the security of your Apple account prevents hackers from getting into your account without the security key, but it’s not for everyone. In this article, I’ll explain why you might want to protect your Apple ID account with a security key, and how to set this feature up.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #276: The Year in Mac Malware 2022

Apple has updated all its operating systems again, and even issued a security update for iOS 12. We discuss new features in the HomePod software, and we look back at the notable Mac malware of 2022.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #275: M2 Chip Boost, New Macs, and the Return of the HomePod

Apple has introduced the latest versions of its M2 chips, and updated three Mac models. They also surprised everyone with a new, full-sized HomePod. We also look at brand-based phishing, Google’s AirTag clones, and a trifecta of stories about instant messaging apps.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Apple Announces M2 Pro & M2 Max Chips, New MacBook Pros, New Mac mini, and New HomePod

In the latest iteration of Apple’s new in-house processors, the company has announced new versions of its M2 chips: the M2 Pro and the M2 Max. With features similar to the M1 Pro and M1 Max, these processors go much further, with more cores, the ability to use more memory, and lower power consumption.

The company also announced new Macs equipped with these processors: an M2 Mac mini, and 14″ and 16″ MacBook Pros, all taking advantage of these faster, more versatile processors, and even brought back the full-sized HomePod, which was discontinued nearly two years ago.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #274: Safari at 20, Apple Crash Detection False Positives, and ChatGPT AI for Hackers

We discuss the 20th anniversary of Apple’s Safari web browser, look at more false positives on roller coasters and ski slopes with Apple’s crash detection, then finish looking at our Apple security and privacy roundup for 2022.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Is Apple’s Crash Detection causing too many false positives?

Apple introduced its Crash Detection feature last year, which is available on the iPhone 14, the Apple Watch SE (2nd generation), the Apple Watch Series 8, and the Apple Watch Ultra. This feature works by detecting sudden changes in G-force, along with “Your speed change, combined with the impact force, combined with the pressure change, combined with the sound level.” When triggered, the Crash Detection feature alerts emergency services, telling them you have had an accident and pinpointing your location.

When it works as intended, Crash Detection can potentially save lives. As one example, it reportedly helped one man find his wife, who was in a serious car accident, before an ambulance arrived.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple’s Safari Web Browser is 20 Years Old

Apple introduced the Safari web browser 20 years ago, on January 7, 2003. At the time, Steve Jobs called Safari, “a turbo browser for Mac OS X.” Apple created Safari for speed, calling it the fastest browser for the Mac. Jobs compared it to Internet Explorer, Netscape, and Chimera, showing that Safari was faster. The second reason that Apple created Safari was to innovate; Apple wanted to make the best browser ever. (See Apple’s first web page presenting Safari.)

The browser wars have changed a lot in 20 years. All three of the competitors mentioned above have faded away, and new browsers have become standard. Google’s Chrome is by far the most popular browser, with Safari a distant second. Following these two are Microsoft Edge and Firefox, both with single-digit market share.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #273: LastPass, TikTok, Phishing, and the Year in Apple Security and Privacy

Password manager LastPass had a data breach, and users’ vaults are at risk; TikTok spied on US journalists; and two new phishing attempts showing how complex techniques are used to try to fool people. And we begin our look at the year in Apple security and privacy.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.