Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #231: Apple Peek Performance Review

Plenty of Apple software updates came out last week and we have the run-down. Look up in the sky, it’s a bird, it’s a plane….it’s a QR code? And, of course, we’ll have our take on the latest gear announced at Apple’s most recent Peek Performance Event.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #230: The Jargon Episode

Do you know your bot from your zombie, your evil maid from your man in the middle? Computer security, like any technical field, has lots of jargon, and in this episode, we explain the terms you hear us use often when talking about malware and security issues.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Apple Releases Mac Studio, Studio Display, and Updates iPhone SE and iPad Air

Spring is in the air, and it’s time for Apple to announce new products. This year’s edition sees Apple release a totally new Mac model, the first in many years, and has also released a display, the first since 2016. Apple also updated its least expensive iPhone and the mid-price iPad Air. And added a couple of new colors to the iPhone 13 for good measure.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #229: Apple Peek Performance Prognostics

Russia has deployed malware against Ukraine in the lead up to its invasion; we have details on the cyber weapons they used. Third-party web browsers for the iPhone and iPad are forced to use WebKit, but want to be free from this requirement. And Apple’s Spring Event is next week. We have a preview of what we hope is coming, along with some Peek Performance Prognostics.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

25 Things You Didn’t Know Siri Can Do

Apple’s virtual assistant Siri is ten years old, and has evolved from an extremely limited voice-activated software agent to a much more sophisticated tool, that is capable of triggering tasks, interacting with apps, and, with Apple’s Shortcuts app, launching complex automations.

Since the beginning, however, it has been difficult to find out exactly what Siri was capable of. In the early days, Siri was quite inflexible, and commands only worked if they were worded in specific ways, but that has improved over time, as Apple has collected huge amounts of data about how people talk to Siri.

Yet you still probably have no idea how many things Siri can do for you. Here are 25 things that you can ask Siri that you might not have thought of.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

The iPod at 20 – How the Portable Music Player Laid the Foundation for Today’s Apple

n 2001, Apple was just getting out of the rut it had been in for many years. Steve Jobs’ return in 1997 led to the iMac, released the following year, that changed the way people looked at personal computers. When the 1999 iMac came in “5 flavors,” computers could be fun.

Financially, the company was starting to come back from a fallow period. Microsoft’s $150 million investment in Apple, in 1997, partly a settlement of patent infringements, bolstered the company for a while, but Apple’s ambitions were big. Apple started selling products through the company’s own online store in November of that year, a decision that would prove profitable, leading to the juggernaut that is Apple’s current direct-to-customer retail machine.

2001 saw the introduction of iTunes (January), the creation of Apple retail stores (the first one opened in May), the introduction of Mac OS X, the biggest change to the Mac’s operating system in a decade (Mac OS X 10.0 was released in March, but the first truly viable version of OS X was 10.1, which came in September), and then, on October 23, 2001, Apple introduced the iPod.

This portable digital music player revolutionized personal computing, and helped Apple build the company as we know it today.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple Goes Pro in Second Homegrown Silicon Salvo

Apple has announced the second wave of Macs running Apple silicon, and has introduced two MacBook Pro models running faster chips than the M1 that Apple introduced last year. The company also announced third-generation AirPods, which offer spatial audio, and new colors for the HomePod mini. Apple announced that macOS Monterey will ship next week. And the company gave some clues about where it’s going in the coming years.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

The Complete Guide to Apple MagSafe Chargers, Cases, and Accessories

Apple’s new iPhones feature the MagSafe charging infrastructure, allowing them to charge without plugging a cable into the devices. While this is not technically “wireless” charging – the MagSafe charger still has a wire – this form of induction charging is practical and it means that you can charge multiple devices without cables.

MagSafe is also a new accessory category for Apple, with a number of different cases available, several chargers, a battery pack, and the MagSafe wallet, which lets you attach a slim leather wallet to your iPhone to carry credit cards or cash.

In this article, I’m going to tell you everything about MagSafe: how it works, what you can charge with it, and which MagSafe accessories are available.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Why doesn’t Apple want people to upgrade to iOS 15?

Apple released iOS 15 and iPadOS 15 on Monday, September 20, and, as usual, many people updated their iPhones, iPads, and iPod touches to the new operating systems. But unlike in the past, Apple is not pushing people to make the upgrade. For the first time, Apple is going to maintain the previous operating system for users who don’t want to upgrade. You can choose to remain on iOS 14, and still get essential security updates, if you’d rather not move to iOS 15. (When I mention iOS in this article, I also include iPadOS.) This is similar to the way Apple manages macOS; you can upgrade to the new version, or continue to receive security updates on the previous version.

While we’re only a few days into the new operating systems, it’s clear that fewer people are making the transition. In general, the uptake is pretty quick, but after two days, it seems that iOS 15 adoption is much lower than for iOS 14. Last year, in the first two days, 14.5% of users had updated, but this year, over the same period, only 8.5% of users had made the switch.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.