What’s New in iOS 13 and iPadOS 13

Apple has released iOS 13 for the iPhone and iPod touch, and the newly-named iPadOS 13 for the iPad. This is the first year that the company has created differently named versions of its mobile operating system for different devices, and there are a number of new features specific to the iPad.

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Here are some of the new features in iOS 13 and iPadOS 13.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 101: New Features in iOS, Smart TVs Spying on You, and More

As iOS 13 is out, Josh and Kirk discuss its new features and what you can look forward to. They also discuss how smart TVs spy on you, sending data about everything you watch. They also discuss a new SIM card flaw, and an iOS 13 lock screen bypass.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Delete Apps on an iPhone or iPad Running iOS 13

A lot of people are getting confused by one of the changes that Apple made in iOS, the method for deleting apps. Previously, you would tap and hold any app icon, then wait until the icons wiggle, then tap the little x on the corner of the icon.

In iOS 13, this is different. When you tap and hold an icon, you no longer see the icons wiggle. Instead, you see this:

Delete app1

Tap Rearrange Apps, and you then see the wiggling icons:

Delete app2

The word “rearrange” is a bit confusing, because most people simply want to delete apps, not move them around.

If you press, hold, then move an app’s icon, apps immediately switch to wiggle mode, and you can quickly reposition it, or just tap the x icon to delete.

Apple Removes Black and White Photo Conversion Tool in iOS

Black and white photography has a long history, and black and white conversion is one of the powerful tools available to photographers to create striking photos. Monochrome photos have a great deal of meaning, and offer a way of showing a reality that is present, but that we do not see.

In the beta versions of Apple’s iOS 13 – and we are nearing release, so the current versions are nearly finished – the Photos app has a new set of editing tools, but there is no black and white tool. Currently in iOS, if you select a photo, tap Edit, then tap the adjust button, you have access to a black and white adjustment tool, as you can see below.

Ios bw

The slider below the photo lets you choose how Photos converts the photo to black and white, making certain tones in the photo darker or lighter.

In iOS 13, the only option you will have is to fully desaturate your photo, then work with adjustments such as shadows, highlights, contrast, and black point. While I sometimes use these adjustments to create monochrome versions of my photos, the color-based conversion is a standard tool, and is often ideal to find the appropriate contrast.

iOS 13 has also removed the global Light adjustment, which lets you change the appearance of a photo by dragging one slider, which then affects the brilliance, brightness, exposure, shadows, highlights, and more. This uses an algorithm that ensures that when you want a photo to be “brighter,” that brightness is balanced, because, for example, more exposure in a photo often requires more contrast to compensate for the additional light. That one-drag adjustment is very easy, and ideal for those who don’t understand the more arcane adjustments available.

It is surprising that Apple has removed these two adjustment tools. For the first, because black and white photos are an essential type of photo, and for the second, because the simplicity of this single slider makes it very easy for anyone to make adjustments to the brightness of their photos. Both of these tools remain in the Mac version of Photos, and, while Apple has added more adjustment tools to Photos for iOS, it’s odd that they would remove these two.

Again, iOS 13 is still a beta, and it’s possible that these tools will be restored, but given that it is nearly ready to ship, I doubt they will be. This is a big loss for those who want to edit their photos on iPhones or iPads.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 87: Privacy Policies Can Be as Complicated as Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason

We discuss running iOS and macOS betas, the new iPod touch, Firefox’s coming subscription service, Safari auto-submitting user names and passwords, and how some companies’ private policies can be as complicated as Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 86: New Security and Privacy Features in macOS Catalina and iOS 13

Apple announced their new operating systems early this week, and we take a close look at the many interesting and useful new security privacy features that will soon be available on your Mac and iOS devices.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

iOS Device Battery Usage when Idle

This isn’t new, but I’m always surprised how quickly the batteries of iOS devices drain when they’re doing nothing. I put an old iPad mini 2 in the kitchen, to watch the news with breakfast, and to display recipes and play music when I’m cooking. I have a charger in the kitchen, but I don’t leave it plugged in all the time. Even though I only use it for about 15 minutes most days, I generally have to plug it in every three or four days.

I got a new iPod touch, and set it up yesterday. Around 6 pm, it was charged to 100%. This morning, at around 8:30, I checked it, and it was at 69%. That’s more than 30% of the battery in a bit over 14 hours.

Ipod touch battery

The iPod was doing nothing other than occasionally checking iCloud, and maintaining wi-fi and Bluetooth active (the latter uses very little power). Yet it used about one-third of its power. Over 24 hours, it would lose nearly half its power.

Apple should improve this element of iOS devices. When they’re not being used for more than a certain amount of time, there should be a sort of hibernation mode. If you put a charged iOS device in a drawer, and leave it for three days, you likely won’t have any power left, and that’s just a waste.

Update: It’s been a while, and it’s clear that if wi-fi is on, then the battery dies pretty quickly. Partly because of the wi-fi itself, but also because of iCloud updating when the device is idle. I have background app refresh turned off globally, but Photos still updates, and downloads new photos; Music still updates iCloud Music Library; and any other Apple iCloud-based app will update as well. So to save battery life, either turn off those features, or put the device into airplane mode. If I do the latter, the battery does deplete, but much more slowly.

It’s Amazing That Anyone Upgrades Their iPhone — 500ish Words

I’ve owned every iPhone since the original one back in 2007. Each time that I get the latest version I do something many people consider crazy: I set it up as a new iPhone, rather than restoring a backup of my last device. My rationale is both simple and silly: I like the idea of this being a natural “reset” of my phone–a way to determine which apps I really want, or more to the point, need, on my device. It’s always far fewer than I think. And certainly less than I would have if I restored and deleted just the ones I thought I wouldn’t miss.

Anyway, I bring this up because this process, while in a way liberating, is also a pain. It takes a long time to re-download every app that I actually want. And, of course, even longer to log in to each of these apps. One by one.

And yet I was reminded this week that my process actually isn’t that much more laborious than the more traditional restore. A few weeks back I bought my wife the latest iPhone–she had been using an iPhone 8, and I wanted her to have the best camera to take pictures of our little girl–but she kept pushing off setting it up. When I asked her why, she noted that the restore process is incredibly slow and cumbersome.

Actually, that was my prim and proper translation of what she said. She really just said that it sucks. And I know she’s not alone in thinking that.

This sort of surprises me since I had heard the restore process had gotten a lot better in recent years as iCloud itself has gone from a laughing stock to quite good. And again, doing this all over-the-air sure sounds much easier than what I do each time with a full rebuild from scratch.

But as it turns out, restoring an iPhone does indeed still suck. While you can do everything via the cloud, there are still a whole slew of things that are no better than a clean install. And in some cases, actually worse.

This is a difficult situation. There is some data that gets lost if you don’t upgrade: health data, and passwords (if you don’t have iCloud Keychain turned on). So the best way is to do an iTunes backup and restore from that.

But the author points out the problem with the new phone that needed an iOS update in order to load the backup, because the phone he had backed up was on a later version of iOS. This is quite frustrating, and gets me every time I don’t get an iPhone on the very first day it’s released.

The whole process is needlessly complicated, especially since iTunes no longer manages apps, and you have to download them all, which can take more than an hour with my internet bandwidth.

Source: It’s Amazing That Anyone Upgrades Their iPhone — 500ish Words

Apple Should Offer an Icon-Only Option for iOS Device Home Screens

I was looking at my iPhone today, and the thought crossed my mind that I don’t really need to see the names of apps beneath their icons. Just as with the four apps in the Dock, I recognize my apps by their icons; their names just get in the way, adding clutter to my iPhone’s home screen. Imagine if it looked like this:

No names

Doesn’t that look a lot better, a lot cleaner? Compare it to this, where the texts of some apps are pretty compressed to make them fit on one line.

Names

It would be great if Apple offered an icon-only option on iOS. One advantage is that it would be possible to decrease the spacing between icons, allowing for an extra row.

These are apps I use daily, and I don’t need to see their names, and I can understand that people who download lots of apps may want to see the names for new apps. So perhaps the option could be just for the first home screen, and only for apps, not for folders.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 67: FaceTime, Facebook, Google, Shortcuts, Steganography, and More

Apple had a mean FaceTime bug; then they slapped down Facebook, and Google, for some underhanded app distribution. There are security risks using iOS Shortcuts, and there’s new malware using steganography.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.