Why doesn’t Apple want people to upgrade to iOS 15?

Apple released iOS 15 and iPadOS 15 on Monday, September 20, and, as usual, many people updated their iPhones, iPads, and iPod touches to the new operating systems. But unlike in the past, Apple is not pushing people to make the upgrade. For the first time, Apple is going to maintain the previous operating system for users who don’t want to upgrade. You can choose to remain on iOS 14, and still get essential security updates, if you’d rather not move to iOS 15. (When I mention iOS in this article, I also include iPadOS.) This is similar to the way Apple manages macOS; you can upgrade to the new version, or continue to receive security updates on the previous version.

While we’re only a few days into the new operating systems, it’s clear that fewer people are making the transition. In general, the uptake is pretty quick, but after two days, it seems that iOS 15 adoption is much lower than for iOS 14. Last year, in the first two days, 14.5% of users had updated, but this year, over the same period, only 8.5% of users had made the switch.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Easily Transfer Files to an iPhone or iPad with Waltr Pro

Waltr 1
I haven’t synced my iPhone to my Mac in a couple of years. On my iMac, I have my main music library, with about 70,000 tracks that I’ve ripped and purchased over the years (from the iTunes Store and other outlets). I don’t want to mix my carefully curated library with my Apple Music library, because there are often problems with metadata getting messed up with matched files.

But sometimes I want to sync music or videos to my iPhone to have in addition to content that’s in my Apple Music library. The new Waltr Pro is one of the best ways to do this. Connect your device, drag a file, and the app recognizes which type of file it is – music, video, ebook-, photos, etc. – and copies it to the appropriate app. If you have multiple apps that can play the file, drag the file while holding the Option key, and Waltr Pro lets you choose which app it copies to.

Waltr 2
Waltr Pro can also convert audio and video files to formats you can play on a Mac. It can convert to a local folder on your Mac, or to your device, and you can edit metadata before converting. It supports tons of file formats too.

Waltr Pro was just released today; check it out here.

How to Remove Wi-Fi Networks from Your Mac and iOS Device

If you travel regularly with your Mac or iOS device, you likely find yourself connecting to new Wi-Fi networks: at airports, in train stations, in hotels, restaurants, pubs, or at clients’ offices. Whether you connect to these networks with your Mac, iPhone, or iPad, miraculously, your devices will remember these networks and sync them via iCloud — so your other Apple products can access them too, if you use iCloud Keychain.

Your Apple device’s ability to remember previously connected to networks can be both good and bad. While it means you don’t have to search for or remember login credentials when you connect to a known Wi-Fi network on a different device, it can lead to a surfeit of Wi-Fi networks stored in your keychain and potentially allow you to unknowingly connect to a Wi-Fi network that might not be secure. You can cull these Wi-Fi networks, but you can only really clean them out on a Mac.

In this article, I’ll show you how to remove these Wi-Fi networks so your Macs and iOS devices forget them.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Set Up a Custom Start Page in Safari 14

It’s useful to have quick access to the websites you visit often, and in Safari 14, you can create a custom Start Page with your favorites, sites you visit often, and much more. Not only can you configure this on your Mac, but your favorites sync via iCloud to your other devices, so you can access the same sites easily on your Mac, iPhone and iPad.

Here’s how you can make your start page really useful in Safari 14.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Should You Back Up Your iOS Device to iCloud or Your Mac?

You probably know how important it is to back up your data, and there are a number of different backup options for Mac.

But it’s also important to back up your iPhone or iPad. While you may not have a lot of documents on these devices that aren’t stored on a cloud server—which you can easily retrieve if necessary—you are likely to have photos and videos which, if you haven’t backed up, could be lost. Additionally, it can take a long time to re-create the setup of your iOS device; re-downloading all your apps, entering your user information, and organizing them on home screens can be a tedious process.

If you have a problem and need to restore your iOS device, it’s easy to do from an existing backup. But if you haven’t backed up your iOS device yet and want to prepare ahead of time, you might be wondering: should you back up your iOS device to iCloud or to your computer? If you use a Mac, since macOS Catalina, you back up your iOS device in the Finder. If you use Windows, or are running a version of macOS prior to Catalina, you back it up in iTunes. While these are different apps, the backup interface is the same.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

macOS 11 and iOS 14 – New Security and Privacy Features

In a socially-distanced keynote address to open Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference yesterday, the company presented new features for the next versions of all of its operating systems. Apple announced new features for macOS, iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, and tvOS, and security and privacy features were prominent across the various operating systems. In this article, I’ll give you an overview of what’s coming in these new operating systems to help ensure your security and privacy on your Mac, iPhone, and iPad.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Managing Battery Life on Macs and iOS Devices

Batteries are essential to our portable devices. For many of us, in our everyday use of Macs and iOS devices, we don’t have to worry too much about this. Modern iPhones and iPads provide a full day‘s battery life, and if you use a portable Mac, you can probably get through the day unless you are using battery-intensive apps.

But sometimes you can’t. If you’re away from home or the office for a long time, you either need to take a portable battery pack with you, or carry a charger and go hunting for available plugs. And, as your devices get older, their batteries lose capacity. This means that instead of, say, a full day of power for your iPhone, you may need to charge it sometime in the afternoon.

In this article, I’m going to tell you how you can check on your battery to see what its capacity is, and how to find which apps use the most power so you can get rid of them to ensure that your devices’ batteries last as long as possible.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #137: Apple operating system updates, iPhone & iPad storage, and shooting video on an iPhone

Apple updated all its operating systems again this week, but a jailbreak vulnerability was found quickly. We discuss the new contact tracing feature in iOS, how to free up storage on an iOS device, and give some tips on shooting video on an iPhone.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Hand Off Music from Your iPhone to HomePod; I Also Want to Hand Off from My Mac to My iPhone

New in iOS 13 is the ability to “hand off” music from an iPhone to a HomePod. If you’re playing any audio on your iPhone, just go near your HomePod (or near one HomePod of a stereo pair), and after a few seconds, the audio will switch from the iPhone to the HomePod.

What this essentially does is switch the output from the iPhone via AirPlay to the Home Pod.

HandoffAs you can see here, the iPhone shows all available AirPlay devices that are active in my home. Music that I was playing on the iPhone (top) then started playing in the bedroom.

As you can see in this interface, you can control a number of AirPlay devices from your iPhone or iPad, sending music to each of them, or controlling playback from Apple Music or your music in the cloud.

What I’d like to see in addition to this is the ability to hand music off from my Mac to my iPhone. If I’m listening to something on my Mac then want to go out, it would be great to pass the music over to that device. It wouldn’t be the same as with the iPhone to the HomePod, which is essentially just playing the music via AirPlay, but it would be more like when you open a web page in Safari, and can then load the same page quickly on an iOS device. Naturally, this would only work with Apple Music or with your music library in the cloud, but it would be a useful addition to the web of Apple devices.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 108: iPad vs. MacBook: is iPadOS a game changer?

With the release of iPadOS, the iPad has become a serious competitor to a laptop. While you can’t do everything on an iPad that you can on a laptop, the gulf between the two is getting slimmer. We talk with Ian Schray, a dedicated iPad user, about replacing a laptop with an iPad.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.