Should You Back Up Your iOS Device to iCloud or Your Mac?

You probably know how important it is to back up your data, and there are a number of different backup options for Mac.

But it’s also important to back up your iPhone or iPad. While you may not have a lot of documents on these devices that aren’t stored on a cloud server—which you can easily retrieve if necessary—you are likely to have photos and videos which, if you haven’t backed up, could be lost. Additionally, it can take a long time to re-create the setup of your iOS device; re-downloading all your apps, entering your user information, and organizing them on home screens can be a tedious process.

If you have a problem and need to restore your iOS device, it’s easy to do from an existing backup. But if you haven’t backed up your iOS device yet and want to prepare ahead of time, you might be wondering: should you back up your iOS device to iCloud or to your computer? If you use a Mac, since macOS Catalina, you back up your iOS device in the Finder. If you use Windows, or are running a version of macOS prior to Catalina, you back it up in iTunes. While these are different apps, the backup interface is the same.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Everything you can do with the Apple Pencil and Logitech Crayon on Your iPad

Steve Jobs famously said, about tablets, “If you need a stylus, you’ve already failed.” But he was talking about using a stylus as the main input device for a tablet. When Apple released the Apple Pencil in 2015, this quote was revived to remind people that a) things have changed, and b) Steve Jobs wasn’t always right.

In 2018, Apple released a second version of the Apple Pencil, with more advanced features designed for the then new iPad Pro models. And Logitech also sells the Crayon, their less expensive pencil, which is compatible with certain iPads.

iOS 14 takes the Pencil further, with Scribble, a new technology that allows you to write in any location where text is accepted.

In this article I’m going to tell you everything you can do with the Apple Pencil, and the Logitech Crayon.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple Introduces New Apple Watch, iPad Air, and AppleOne Services Bundle

It’s a strange year. Instead of the annual iPhone-fest that we’ve become familiar with in September, Apple’s flagship product is delayed until next month. So the company has presented some new items: the latest Apple Watch, an updated iPad Air, and a bundle of services and subscriptions called AppleOne. In another pre-recorded event from Apple’s spaceship campus, Apple showed off these new products and services, and, to the surprise of many, announced the released of iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 for today.

Here’s what’s new from Apple.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple’s New Plans for the iPhone, iPad, and Mac Unveiled at WWDC 2020

It was a different type of presentation at this year’s WWDC. Gone was the venue packed with thousands of developers and journalists, cheering at the announcements of new features, now relegated to memories for this year because of the coronavirus. Instead, Apple presented a very fast-paced pre-recorded keynote outlining where the company is going with this year’s operating systems. At the same time, Apple announced a big change to macOS, and the biggest change to the Mac in 15 years.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #136: Tips for using your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch

We look at some practical tips for getting more out of your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch. We take a close look at System Preferences, discuss using the iPad as a second screen for your Mac; and a handful of tips for making the Apple Watch more efficient. Also, Josh and Kirk disagree about Microsoft’s choice to flag two spaces after a period in Word as an error.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Use Your iPad as Your Mac’s Second Screen with Sidecar

One of the more useful features in macOS Catalina is Sidecar, which allows you to use your iPad as a second display for your Mac. This is practical if you want to work on a document on your iPad using the Apple Pencil, or if you want to be able to show something from your Mac to a colleague or client without them needing to look over your shoulder. And if you work on a laptop, having that additional screen space for occasional or even regular usage can make your work a lot smoother.

In this article, I’ll show you how you can use Sidecar to extend your Mac’s display.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

The Magic Keyboard Turns the iPad into a New Computing Device

The iPad has never been a “real” computer, but has always challenged the very idea of what a computer is. We have computers on our desks, on our laps, in our pockets, and on our wrists, though we don’t use that term for all of them. The iPad has always been a hybrid: it can work on a desk, with or without a stand, and with an optional keyboard, or we can hold it in our hands, touching, tapping, and swiping.

It has evolved from Steve Jobs’ original vision to support a stylus, and now Apple’s Magic Keyboard takes the device in ways that couldn’t have been imagined when the first iPad was released ten years ago.

This new keyboard, with built-in trackpad, blurs the lines between computer and tablet, and between macOS and iOS (or, more correctly, since last year, iPadOS, with it’s unique features that set it apart from the operating system used on the iPhone and iPod touch).

The Magic Keyboard is the next step in shifting the definition of what a computer is. This device goes further than the company’s previous iPad keyboard case to include a trackpad, and has a clever way of holding the iPad firmly in the air, allowing it to tilt to different angles (though the tilting is limited).

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Which iPad Is Best for You?

Ten years ago this month, Apple released the first iPad. Available in one size (9.7″), with three storage options (16, 32, or 64 GB), a Wi-Fi only version was released first, with a Wi-Fi and cellular model following shortly after. At the time, this ground-breaking device was competing with netbooks (remember them?) for primacy in the lightweight/portable device market. It didn’t take long for the iPad, and the tablet in general, to flourish.

Over the years, Apple has iterated the iPad many times, recently releasing the 20th version of the device, the latest iPad Pro.

It used to be easy to choose an iPad. When there were just a couple of models available, all you needed to choose was the color and how much storage you wanted. But things have changed. Nowadays, you have multiple options to choose from, each with varying configurations; it’s not so simple to know right off the bat which iPad is best for you.

If you want an iPad today, there are four different models, each with different feature sets. There are five different sizes, and the base price varies from as low as $329 to as much as $999 (these prices are for Wi-Fi only, with the base storage amount, and without any of the accessories that make the new iPad Pro models interesting). You can choose models that offer Wi-Fi, or both cellular and Wi-Fi, and there are two or three color options, depending on the model.

Based on your needs, how can you tell which iPad you should get? In this article, I’m going to take a look at the different iPad models, and recommend which iPad is best for you, depending on how you plan to use it.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 123: Switching Default Apps on the iPhone and iPad

Your iPhone or iPad comes with 36 default apps, including Mail, Safari, and Messages. You may want to use other apps for email, for browsing, and for messaging, in part to enhance your security and privacy. While you can’t set other apps to replace the defaults, as you can on macOS, you can switch. We explain how.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The iPad Awkwardly Turns 10 – Daring Fireball

Ten years later, though, I don’t think the iPad has come close to living up to its potential. By the time the Mac turned 10, it had redefined multiple industries. In 1984 almost no graphic designers or illustrators were using computers for work. By 1994 almost all graphic designers and illustrators were using computers for work. The Mac was a revolution. The iPhone was a revolution. The iPad has been a spectacular success, and to tens of millions it is a beloved part of their daily lives, but it has, to date, fallen short of revolutionary.

[…]

Software is where the iPad has gotten lost. iPadOS’s “multitasking” model is far more capable than the iPhone’s, yes, but somehow Apple has painted it into a corner in which it is far less consistent and coherent than the Mac’s, while also being far less capable. iPad multitasking: more complex, less powerful. That’s quite a combination.

Consider the basic task of putting two apps on screen at the same time, the basic definition of “multitasking” in the UI sense. To launch the first app, you tap its icon on the homescreen, just like on the iPhone, and just like on the iPad before split-screen multitasking. Tapping an icon to open an app is natural and intuitive. But to get a second app on the same screen, you cannot tap its icon. You must first slide up from the bottom of the screen to reveal the Dock. Then you must tap and hold on an app icon in the Dock. Then you drag the app icon out of the Dock to launch it in a way that it will become the second app splitting the display. But isn’t dragging an icon out of the Dock the way that you remove apps from the Dock? Yes, it is — when you do it from the homescreen. So the way you launch an app in the Dock for split-screen mode is identical to the way you remove that app from the Dock. Oh, and apps that aren’t in the Dock can’t become the second app in split screen mode. What sense does that limitation make?

[…]

How would anyone ever figure out how to split-screen multitask on the iPad if they didn’t already know how to do it?

Multitasking on the iPad is one of those things that 2% of people will use, because only, say, 10% bother to figure out how it works, and most of them will find it too unwieldy to use. (Yes, I’m estimating, for rhetorical reasons…) While I think it’s great that Apple has forked iOS to create an iPad specific version, it’s too complicated to use these features.

I don’t use my iPad a lot, but I know there are people who use it as their main computing device. While some of them leverage every possible feature of multitasking, shortcuts, etc., most probably just use a one-app-at-a-time approach. Why? Because it’s not confusing. When I have used multitasking, I’ve never felt that I accomplished any app-arranging actions by anything other than luck.

It’s not Apple’s fault that they couldn’t come up with a better system, it’s just the limitations of the device and its interface. If they want people to use these features, they need to figure out a way to make them easy to use, and, above all, easy to discover.

Source: Daring Fireball: The iPad Awkwardly Turns 10