The Complete Guide to Taking Screenshots and Screen Recordings on Mac, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch

Taking screenshots on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad, is a great way to save things. Rather than save a URL of a web page, you can save a picture of it, so you can see it exactly as it was at the time you shot it. You may want to do this when you’ve bought something online, and want to keep a record of the purchase confirmation. You may also take screenshots just to remember items you’ve been shopping for on your iPhone or iPad, or to send to a friend to show them something you’ve seen. Or you may take a screenshot of some text to post on social media. Or, you may need to take screenshots to demonstrate a problem with your device.

On macOS, iOS, and iPadOS, it’s easy to take screenshots, crop them, and annotate them, and they save to the Photos app (on iOS and iPadOS) or to the Finder, so you can access them quickly. You can even take screenshots of your Apple Watch.

Here’s how to take screenshots on Apple devices.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Hands On with Apple’s New M1 iMac and M1 iPad Pro

We’ve finally got the second delivery of Apple’s M1 Macs, after the first salvo, last fall, with updated versions of the Mac mini, MacBook Air, and 13″ Mac Pro. But these models were simply new gets in old clothes; the new 24″ iMac has a totally new design, replacing the older 21.5″ model. This new iMac increases the display from 4K to 4.5K, with only small changes in the computer’s size. We also now have Apple’s M1 chip powering the latest iPad Pro models, both at the same size as previously, 11″ and 12.9″.

Here’s what’s new in these devices.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Which iPad Is Best for You?

In 2010, Apple released the first iPad. Available in one size (9.7″), with three storage options (16, 32, or 64 GB), a Wi-Fi only version was released first, with a Wi-Fi and cellular model following shortly after. At the time, this ground-breaking device was competing with netbooks (remember them?) for primacy in the lightweight/portable device market. It didn’t take long for the iPad, and the tablet in general, to flourish.

Over the years, Apple has iterated the iPad many times, with nearly two dozen different models in many sizes.

It used to be easy to choose an iPad. When there were just a couple of models available, all you needed to choose was the color and how much storage you wanted. But things have changed. Nowadays, you have multiple options to choose from, each with varying configurations; it’s not so simple to know right off the bat which iPad is best for you.

If you want an iPad today, there are four different models, each with different feature sets. There are five different sizes, and the base price varies from as low as $329 to as much as $1099 (these prices are for Wi-Fi only, with the base storage amount, and without any of the accessories that make the new iPad Pro models interesting). You can choose models that offer Wi-Fi, or both cellular and Wi-Fi, and even 5G on some models, and there are as many as five color options, depending on the model.

Based on your needs, how can you tell which iPad you should get? In this article, I’m going to look at the different iPad models and recommend which iPad is best for you, depending on how you plan to use it.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple Announces New iMacs, iPads, AirTags, and More

After the first flurry of Macs running Apple’s own processors, in November of last year, Apple has made another step toward transitioning the entire Mac line to these new chips. The new iMac, announced yesterday, not only features Apple’s own M1 processor, but is the first Mac to benefit from a redesign along with this upgrade. At the same time, Apple announced new iPad Pros, AirTags, and a refresh of the Apple TV 4K.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Everything You Need to Know About Batteries in Your iPhone, iPad, and Mac

If there’s one thing we need to use our mobile devices and computers it’s power. Without it, these devices are just bricks. Managing power on mobile and portable devices has long been a balancing act between performance and comfort. You don’t want to cripple your devices by turning off too many useful features, but, depending on how you use your mobile devices, you may need to stretch the battery life as long as possible.

In this article, I’m going to tell you how batteries work on Apple devices, how long they last, how to optimize your battery use, when to use low power mode, and when to get a new battery for your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Should You Back Up Your iOS Device to iCloud or Your Mac?

You probably know how important it is to back up your data, and there are a number of different backup options for Mac.

But it’s also important to back up your iPhone or iPad. While you may not have a lot of documents on these devices that aren’t stored on a cloud server—which you can easily retrieve if necessary—you are likely to have photos and videos which, if you haven’t backed up, could be lost. Additionally, it can take a long time to re-create the setup of your iOS device; re-downloading all your apps, entering your user information, and organizing them on home screens can be a tedious process.

If you have a problem and need to restore your iOS device, it’s easy to do from an existing backup. But if you haven’t backed up your iOS device yet and want to prepare ahead of time, you might be wondering: should you back up your iOS device to iCloud or to your computer? If you use a Mac, since macOS Catalina, you back up your iOS device in the Finder. If you use Windows, or are running a version of macOS prior to Catalina, you back it up in iTunes. While these are different apps, the backup interface is the same.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Everything you can do with the Apple Pencil and Logitech Crayon on Your iPad

Steve Jobs famously said, about tablets, “If you need a stylus, you’ve already failed.” But he was talking about using a stylus as the main input device for a tablet. When Apple released the Apple Pencil in 2015, this quote was revived to remind people that a) things have changed, and b) Steve Jobs wasn’t always right.

In 2018, Apple released a second version of the Apple Pencil, with more advanced features designed for the then new iPad Pro models. And Logitech also sells the Crayon, their less expensive pencil, which is compatible with certain iPads.

iOS 14 takes the Pencil further, with Scribble, a new technology that allows you to write in any location where text is accepted.

In this article I’m going to tell you everything you can do with the Apple Pencil, and the Logitech Crayon.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple Introduces New Apple Watch, iPad Air, and AppleOne Services Bundle

It’s a strange year. Instead of the annual iPhone-fest that we’ve become familiar with in September, Apple’s flagship product is delayed until next month. So the company has presented some new items: the latest Apple Watch, an updated iPad Air, and a bundle of services and subscriptions called AppleOne. In another pre-recorded event from Apple’s spaceship campus, Apple showed off these new products and services, and, to the surprise of many, announced the released of iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 for today.

Here’s what’s new from Apple.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple’s New Plans for the iPhone, iPad, and Mac Unveiled at WWDC 2020

It was a different type of presentation at this year’s WWDC. Gone was the venue packed with thousands of developers and journalists, cheering at the announcements of new features, now relegated to memories for this year because of the coronavirus. Instead, Apple presented a very fast-paced pre-recorded keynote outlining where the company is going with this year’s operating systems. At the same time, Apple announced a big change to macOS, and the biggest change to the Mac in 15 years.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #136: Tips for using your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch

We look at some practical tips for getting more out of your Mac, iPad, and Apple Watch. We take a close look at System Preferences, discuss using the iPad as a second screen for your Mac; and a handful of tips for making the Apple Watch more efficient. Also, Josh and Kirk disagree about Microsoft’s choice to flag two spaces after a period in Word as an error.

Check out The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.