How to Securely Erase Data from Your Mac and External Drives

Your Mac, and any external drives you use, may contain important personal data. Your Mac’s drive is full of sensitive data: all your emails, contacts, private documents, and more. If you use an external drive for, say, your music and video libraries, then this isn’t the case, but if you use an external drive for backups, there there’s lots of sensitive data on it.

Whenever you dispose of a Mac, or an external drive, you should securely erase it to ensure that no one can harvest data from it.

In this article, I’ll explain how to securely erase all sorts of drives: hard drives, flash drives, and SSDs.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Remove Wi-Fi Networks from Your Mac and iOS Device

If you travel regularly with your Mac or iOS device, you likely find yourself connecting to new Wi-Fi networks: at airports, in train stations, in hotels, restaurants, pubs, or at clients’ offices. Whether you connect to these networks with your Mac, iPhone, or iPad, miraculously, your devices will remember these networks and sync them via iCloud — so your other Apple products can access them too, if you use iCloud Keychain.

Your Apple device’s ability to remember previously connected to networks can be both good and bad. While it means you don’t have to search for or remember login credentials when you connect to a known Wi-Fi network on a different device, it can lead to a surfeit of Wi-Fi networks stored in your keychain and potentially allow you to unknowingly connect to a Wi-Fi network that might not be secure. You can cull these Wi-Fi networks, but you can only really clean them out on a Mac.

In this article, I’ll show you how to remove these Wi-Fi networks so your Macs and iOS devices forget them.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #179: Google, iOS Security Updates, and the End of the Original HomePod

Google is sued for its incognito browsing mode. iOS security updates may be delivered more frequently. We look at how easy it is to take over someone’s SMS messages. And we discuss the demise of the original HomePod.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

12 Ways to Open Files on a Mac

You open files every time you work on your Mac, most often, probably, by double-clicking them. But did you know that there are lots of different ways to open files? You can use your mouse, your trackpad, or even your keyboard. You can open files in windows, from menus, and from dialogs. Here are a dozen ways you can open files on a Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Everything You Need to Know About Batteries in Your iPhone, iPad, and Mac

If there’s one thing we need to use our mobile devices and computers it’s power. Without it, these devices are just bricks. Managing power on mobile and portable devices has long been a balancing act between performance and comfort. You don’t want to cripple your devices by turning off too many useful features, but, depending on how you use your mobile devices, you may need to stretch the battery life as long as possible.

In this article, I’m going to tell you how batteries work on Apple devices, how long they last, how to optimize your battery use, when to use low power mode, and when to get a new battery for your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to choose the right Mac for your use case

Apple’s Mac product line has changed a lot recently, and if you’re looking for a new Mac, you have a number of options to consider. For some, it’s a simple choice, but for others, the choice can be more complex.

You may need a desktop Mac, and you currently have four options for that type of computer. If you want a laptop, then you have three options. But you might want to use a laptop on your desk as well, increasing the number of possibilities. In this article, I’m going to help you choose which Mac you need according to your use case.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #165: What Do You Want for Christmas?

Apple announces new over-the-ear headphones, AirPods Max, and we discuss whether these meet the needs of our hosts. Apple doubles down on anti-tracking rules, and WhatsApps complains about Apple’s coming “nutritional labels” about data collection in apps. And Apple and Cloudflare have come up with a new way of sending DNS requests that protects privacy.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Color Calibrate Your Mac’s Display

If you only use your Mac for browsing the Web, sending and receiving email, and working in a word processor, it’s probably not all that important for it to display accurate colors. However, if you work with photos or videos, or even if you like to watch movies in the best possible conditions, color calibrating your display is essential.

The calibration process tweaks a number of settings to get the colors and contrast on your Mac as accurate as possible. It does this by changing the intensity of the main colors — red, blue, and green — and setting the white point, or the neutral white color that you see when, say, you open a new document in a word processor.

It’s easy to color calibrate your Mac’s display, and you can do so quickly by eye, or you can use additional hardware to get your colors exactly right. Here’s how you can do it.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #162: How To Prepare Your Mac for macOS Big Sur

Apple released macOS Big Sur last week. On release day, there were a number of issues, including problems launching apps on Macs. We discuss what happened, and how Apple is changing its Gatekeeper security check. We also talk about when you should upgrade to Big Sur and how you should prepare your Mac for the big upgrade.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Mac and iOS Keychain Tutorial: How Apple’s iCloud Keychain Works

You use passwords to log into websites and services, and since there are so many of them, it’s hard to remember them. It’s a bad idea to use the same password for different websites, because if one site is compromised, hackers will have an email address and password that they can try on other sites. Because of this, you need to ensure that your passwords are different for every website and app, and that they are hard to crack. (An episode of the Intego Mac Podcast talks about password strategies.)

Your Macs and iOS devices have a “keychain,” which is an encrypted file that stores your logins, passwords, and some other information. This file syncs via iCloud, so you can use the same passwords on all your devices. Here’s how Apple’s iCloud keychain works.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.