17 Reasons Why You Should Use an iPod touch in 2022

With a wide range of iPhone and iPad models to choose from, why would you use an iPod touch today? Apple isn’t trying to sell it; they have hidden the device. You won’t find the iPod touch on any of its main pages; you have to search for it if you want one. When you get there, you see that you can have “Fun at full speed.” This is the slogan Apple used the last time they updated the iPod touch, back in May 2019. The 7th generation device sports an A10 Fusion chip, and was updated from the previous 2015 model, which had an A8 processor.

That update did more than just increment the processor, which moved from 2 cores to 4 cores and nearly doubled the clock speed. It increased the RAM from 1 GB to 2 GB; it includes a better graphics chip; and it has four cores instead of two. It also ensured that the device runs with more recent versions of iOS. The 6th generation iPod touch is limited to iOS 12; the 7th generation runs the current iOS 15.

Starting at $199, it is the cheapest iOS device. It comes with 32 GB storage, and you can increase it to 128 GB ($299) or 256 GB ($399). For comparison, the low-end iPhone SE (2nd generation) costs $429 with 64GB and the 256 GB model costs $579. So if you want a portable device with a lot of storage, the iPod touch is the cheapest.

But why use the iPod touch today? Here are 17 reasons you might want to use this device.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Apple’s AirTags: One Year On

It has been one year since Apple released AirTags, the small tracking devices that leverage the vast network of iPhones and iPads. Designed to help you find your keys, track your luggage, and keep tabs on your backpack, these devices have also been used for stalking and theft. Here’s an overview of the first year of AirTags.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Everything You Can Do with iCloud – The Complete Guide

iCloud is the umbrella for Apple’s services that you can access with your Mac, iPhone, or iPad. Not all of the company’s services; there are other services, such as Apple Music, Apple TV+, Apple Arcade, and others, which you access with a paid subscription. But iCloud is the backbone of the services you use to manage your data and communicate with others.

In this article, I’ll explain what all the various elements of iCloud are, and how they work together.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

USB-C and Thunderbolt: Understanding Ports and Cables for Macs and iPads

The ports that you use to connect keyboards, mice, and hard drives to your Macs have changed over the years. Current Macs have USB-C, which provide standard USB speeds, along with faster Thunderbolt to compatible peripherals. But what’s the difference between USB-C and Thunderbolt ports, and how can you tell them apart? And which cables do you need to get the most out of them?

In this article, I’m going to explain what Thunderbolt and USB-C ports are, how to identify them, how they work, which features they offer, and how to choose the right cables for your needs.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Learn How to Record All Types of Audio on Your Mac, with Take Control of Audio Hijack

Take Control of Audio Hijack 2 0 cover 1187x1536In this 143-page book, you’ll learn how to use version 4 of Rogue Amoeba’s Audio Hijack to capture and enhance any audio coming out of your Mac, whether it’s your own voice via a microphone, a streaming radio show in Safari, or audio from a DVD. Audio expert Kirk McElhearn covers a variety of scenarios—including recording Zoom calls, digitizing LPs, and making podcasts—and provides a bonus chapter about editing your recordings in Rogue Amoeba’s Fission audio editor.

Get Take Control of Audio Hijack.

You’ll learn how to pipe sound through Audio Hijack to enhance its quality without recording. For example, by boosting the volume or tweaking the bass—movies on Netflix never sounded better!

You’ll also discover special features such as reusable sessions, recording to more than one file (and format) at once, scheduling recordings, time shifting during live playback, effects like ducking and panning, adding automatic metadata before recording, and more. And you’ll learn how to use Audio Hijack as a powerful tool for live streaming or broadcasting.

The Fission chapter has directions for trimming, cropping, adding, replacing, splitting, and fading audio. It also explains how to turn an audio file into a ringtone and—podcasters and educators take note!—how to make a chapterized AAC file.

Get Take Control of Audio Hijack.

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How to Use Thread HomeKit Devices with Apple TV and HomePod mini

Apple’s HomeKit controls many smart home devices: from lights to thermostats, from doorbells to home security systems. Many users may never see the Home app, while others may use it regularly with dozens of devices, but and can use Siri to turn these devices on and off.

HomeKit has slowly grown since its introduction, and Apple has expanded its reach through new devices. Yet they don’t publicize this much. One technology, called Thread, enhances the way smart home devices can work, and two Apple devices – the Apple TV 4K and the HomePod mini – provide special features for Thread networks.

In this article, I’ll explain what Thread is, why you should care, and how the smart home is getting smarter.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Run Windows on an Intel or M1 Mac

For some people, running Windows on a Mac is the perfect way to use a specific app that is unavailable on Mac, or to play Windows games. For a long time, it was easy to run Windows on a Mac. Since Windows is designed to run on an Intel processor, you could Windows on your Mac and boot into Windows, or run it in a virtual machine on your Mac.

But with the new M1 Macs, which run on a variant of ARM processors, everything has changed. In this article, I’ll look at the various options for running Windows on an Intel Mac, then discuss how you can run Windows on a new M1 Mac.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Use Live Text on iPhone, iPad, and Mac

One of the useful new features in iOS 15, iPadOS 15, and macOS Monterey is Live Text. This feature converts text in images to text that you can copy. You can use this to point your iPhone’s camera at a phone number, then immediately make a call to that number; to zoom in on an address, then find that address in Maps; or even translate text on signs into one of a number of languages.

This also works in macOS; not with a camera, but with photos or screenshots. In the Photos app, or in Preview, you can select and copy text from images.

Here’s how to use Live Text.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #211: Say Hey to macOS Monterey

Apple releases macOS Monterey, the company’s newest desktop operating system, along with a number of security updates. We discuss Apple’s new M1 Pro and M1 Max MacBook Pro models, which may be too powerful for most users. And if you’re getting a new Mac, we discuss which is better: migrating your old system, or doing a clean installation.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The Complete Guide to Taking Screenshots and Screen Recordings on Mac, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch

Taking screenshots on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad, is a great way to save things. Rather than save a URL of a web page, you can save a picture of it, so you can see it exactly as it was at the time you shot it. You may want to do this when you’ve bought something online, and want to keep a record of the purchase confirmation. You may also take screenshots just to remember items you’ve been shopping for on your iPhone or iPad, or to send to a friend to show them something you’ve seen. Or you may take a screenshot of some text to post on social media. Or, you may need to take screenshots to demonstrate a problem with your device.

On macOS, iOS, and iPadOS, it’s easy to take screenshots, crop them, and annotate them, and they save to the Photos app (on iOS and iPadOS) or to the Finder, so you can access them quickly. You can even take screenshots of your Apple Watch.

Here’s how to take screenshots on Apple devices.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.