Quintin Lake on walking and photographing all 11,000 kilometers of the British coastline

In April 2015, Quintin Lake set out to walk the entire perimeter of the coast of Great Britain, photographing the edges of the land where it intersects with the sea. He didn’t plan to do this uninterrupted, but in sections up to two months, after which he would return home for a while. This 11,000-kilometer (6,835-mile) journey ended in September 2020, after injuries, COVID-19 lockdowns, and plenty of terrible weather. His project is called The Perimeter.

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PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 117: John Cornicello on Lens Distortion

In episode 110, Kirk and Jeff talked about dealing with distortion when you’re editing your photos. Now we’re happy to welcome portrait photographer and educator John Cornicello to discuss distortion when you’re photographing. You know those grids of headshots that demonstrate how wide-angle lenses cause distorted features? They’re wrong, and John explains why.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 116: iPad Photo Editing

Is an iPad good for photo editing? It can be great for slimming your amount of gear on a trip, but what tradeoffs are involved? In this episode, Jeff and Kirk look at using an iPad or iPad Pro in a photography workflow, from importing images to culling and sorting to editing the photos.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Walker Evans’ American Photographs, and five other photobooks worth checking out

This month, we look at a wide range of photobooks. Mika Horie’s cyanotypes present the world in blue; Stephen Shore’s memoir looks back on his long career; Zora J Murff explores Blackness in America; Stephen Gill’s photos of birds on a pillar present a new take on wildlife photography; a presentation of 3D images from the dawn of photography hints at what might have been; and Walker Evans’ classic photos of Americans in the depression remain timely.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 115: iPhone Camera Tips and Tricks

Millions of people take billions of photos using the built-in Camera app on their iPhones, so we wanted to do an episode all about the clever and sometimes hidden capabilities of this camera that’s always with you.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 114: Why Color Doesn’t Exist

An offhand remark from our guest Bryan Jones when he was a guest on a previous episode stuck with us: “You know color doesn’t actually exist, right?” We had to invite him back to explain! Jones, a retinal neuroscientist, explains that color is really a shared hallucination and talks about how photographers can take advantage of this knowledge.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Landscape photographer Michael Kenna on viewing old work with fresh eyes, and the joys of the analog process

In March 2020, when COVID-19 led to worldwide lockdowns, Michael Kenna had a full calendar of trips and exhibits planned for the months to come. Instead, he found himself stuck at home with nowhere to go. Rather than taking new photos, he went back into his archive to look with fresh eyes at some of his earliest work. The result is Northern England 1983-1986, a book of photos from the area around where Kenna was born and grew up.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 113: Do Photographers Need the Mac Studio?

Apple announced the Mac Studio, a brand new M1-based desktop Mac that smokes the performance of even the Mac Pro. But is it a good machine for photographers? Jeff and Kirk discuss what’s interesting about the Mac Studio and the new Studio Display.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The PhotoActive on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Magnum’s latest Square Print Sale showcases ‘the start of something new’

Magnum is back with another of its regular Square Print Sales, allowing collectors to purchase affordably-priced signed or estate-stamped 6-by-6-inch photos by well-known photographers.

At $100 each, this is a great way to start or expand a photo collection. And you can choose from a wide range of images, including photos depicting historical events, portraits of famous people, snapshots of touching moments, or whimsical slices of life.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.

Alec Soth’s ‘Pound of Pictures,’ and four other analog-only photobooks worth checking out

It’s Film Week here on PopPhoto, and to celebrate, we’ve rounded up a selection of contemporary photobooks—and one classic—all shot on film.

Documentary shooter Alec Soth set out to photograph America, by following the route of Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train, and ended up buying “photos by the pound.” Robert Adams shows the “silence of America” in a 50-year retrospective. A half-dozen collotype prints show the ethereal work of Rinko Kawauchi. Deanna Templeton links recent portraits of adolescent women with her own teenage years. And Diane Arbus’s only photo portfolio is still powerful after more than 50 years.

Read the rest of the article on Popular Photography.