Podcast Recommendations: Julian Barnes on BBC 3 The Essay, Discussing How He Has Changed His Mind

400x400bbBBC Radio 3 has a series called The Essay, which consists of brief essays read by their authors.

Two weeks ago, they had a series of five essays by Julian Barnes, discussing how he has changed his mind over the years. He looks at memory, words, politics, books, and time.

These are fascinating texts, delicately read by Barnes, who, if you’ve read his work, is a master of subtlety. All five of these essays address interesting questions, and are well worth listening to.

The Next Track, Episode #31 – Jim Dalrymple of The Loop on Apple Music

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxWe welcome Jim Dalrymple of The Loop to discuss his experiences with Apple Music.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #31 — Jim Dalrymple on Apple Music.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #30 – Christmas Gift Guide

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxWhy not spread a bit of holiday cheer? Doug and Kirk pick their selections for great Christmas gifts.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #30 — Christmas Gift Guide.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #29 – Tagging Digital Audio Files

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxDoug and Kirk explain everything you need to know about tagging your digital audio files.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #29 — Tagging Audio Files.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #28 – Music and Mystery: Author Peter Robinson on Music in His Novels

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxAuthor Peter Robinson joins us to discuss how he uses music in his DCI Banks series of mystery novels.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #28 — Music and Mystery: Author Peter Robinson on Music in His Novels.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #27 – Composing Music for Stage and Screen, with Paul Englishby

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxPaul Englishby talks about composing music for stage and screen, including the Royal Shakespeare Company’s new production of The Tempest.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #27 — Composing Music for Stage and Screen, with Paul Englishby.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #26 – Andy Doe Answers Your Questions about Audio Equipment and Technology

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxAndy Doe answers listener questions about audio equipment and technology in our first Ask Andy episode.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #26 – Andy Doe Answers Your Questions about Audio Equipment and Technology.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #25 – Part 2 of Interview with Composer Timo Andres on Contemporary Classical Music

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxDoug and Kirk welcome Timo Andres, composer and performer of contemporary classical music for part two of his interview. He discusses his music, and the business of classical music.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #25 — Composer Timo Andres on Contemporary Classical Music, Part 2.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

Please, Please, For The Love Of God: Do Not Start a Podcast – Thought Catalog

“I am down on copycats and trend followers. I like podcasting too much and value my own sanity (and the sanity of other awesome people) too much to think that the world needs us to collectively waste time on other people’s self-indulgent personal brand building. I remember when blogging was the rage and I can see now how many of those people were never serious about the medium–and how much effort went to waste when they eventually quit.

It’s because I love podcasts that I am happy listening. The world needs more listeners. We could probably make do with less talking. So unless we’re going to put in the kind of work that Jordan or some of the greats have done, let’s just be listeners–until we find something we are willing to invest in.

So please, please don’t start a podcast. Do your own thing instead.”

This is an article by some guy I’ve never heard of telling people they shouldn’t start podcasts because they wouldn’t be interesting enough. Some of his points are valid, particularly about copycat podcasts. But I find this sort of dismissive attitude to be elitist and entitled. He thinks most podcasts suck, but his reasons are vague.

When Doug Adams and I started our podcast The Next Track, which looks at how people listen to music today, we had some clear objectives. We wanted to talk about both music and the technology we use to listen to music. We wanted it to be a tight, edited podcast, rather than just two middle-aged guys gabbing, so we limit eac episode to about 30 minutes, with lots of editing so it sounds like a radio show. And we wanted to eventually make some money from it. We’ve had one sponsor buy a block of episodes, and another commit to some in the future, so our approach seems to be working. But above all, we wanted to do something we enjoy, and that we feel stands out. We’re slowly building an audience, and we’ve found that we cover a range of topics that wasn’t being dealt with before.

So, if you want to start a podcast and have an original idea, go for it. Don’t let some grumpy guy tell you otherwise.

Source: Please, Please, For The Love Of God: Do Not Start a Podcast | Thought Catalog

The Next Track, Episode #24 – Composer Timo Andres on Contemporary Classical Music

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxDoug and Kirk welcome Timo Andres, composer and performer of contemporary classical music. This is the first part of a two-part interview.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #24 — Composer Timo Andres on Contemporary Classical Music.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.