Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #201: Apple’s New Child Protection Features that Scan Photos on Devices

Apple has announced Expanded Protections for Children, designed to help limit the spread of child sexual abuse material. However, these features scan photos on iPhones and iPads, and many privacy advocates are concerned by their potential for misuse.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #191: New Privacy Features in iOS 15 and macOS Monterey

Apple introduced its new operating systems this week, and there are plenty of privacy features to help users better control their data. We discuss these new features, and especially a number of important features that Apple didn’t discuss at the keynote.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Apple’s New Privacy Features for iOS 15, iPadOS 15, and macOS Monterey

Apple made its first presentation yesterday of its 2021 vintage of operating systems: iOS 15, iPadOS 15, macOS Monterey, and watchOS 8. In addition to some new features to increase productivity, there are many new privacy features that give users more control over their data. And Apple has announced iCloud+, a privacy-focused service available to all users who pay for additional iCloud storage.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Amazon Sidewalk Wants to Share Your Wi-Fi: Here’s How to Disable It

Amazon Sidewalk is a new feature of Amazon devices, which goes live on June 8 in the US, that allows these devices to share their wi-fi with other, nearby Amazon devices. Amazon claims that Amazon Sidewalk will help ensure that your Echo and Ring devices remain connected through a sort-of mesh wi-fi network created by these devices.

For example, if you have some Ring security cameras, and one of them is at a location outside your home that is just out of range of your wi-fi, the device can piggyback on your neighbor’s wi-fi, if they also have Ring devices. Since Ring devices are quite popular – especially for doorbells – many people live in areas where the range of these devices may overlap. Or if your wi-fi goes down, you can still get notifications via a neighbor’s internet connection.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #186: Facebook and Instagram Beg Users to Be Allowed to Track Them

Apple issued emergency security updates to its operating systems to protect against vulnerabilities exploited in the wild. Facebook and Instagram plead to be allowed to track users. And we discuss how QR codes can be switched and could pose risks to users.

Follow the The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Tell Apps Not to Track You in iOS 14.5

One of Apple’s more contentious new features is finally available in the recent iOS and iPadOS 14.5 update. It’s not contentious to users, but to companies like Facebook, who make money from tracking you across apps and websites, it represents a real challenge. Here’s how to ensure that Facebook and others can’t track you, and why you should.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to remove GPS location data from photos on iPhone or Mac

It’s great to have location data stored in your photos. This allows you to sort through your photo library and find all your photos from your last vacation, or from favorite sites you like to visit. For some photos, like that one of the Eiffel Tower, it’s obvious where you’ve taken them. But you may not want people to be able to figure out where all your photos were taken. For example, you probably don’t want location data in photos you’ve taken in your back yard showing up on social media, allowing people to find exactly where you live.

It’s easy to remove location data when sharing photos from your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Here’s how.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Use private browsing to maintain your privacy on the web

You know that whenever you visit a website, a great deal of data is collected about you by the company running the website, and by third parties that track you to serve ads. The more you use the web, the more information goes into profiles that companies like Google and Facebook use to target ads that match your search terms, the types of websites you visit, and more.

While you can use an ad blocker to not see ads, and also to block some of the trackers used to follow you around, these tools aren’t 100% effective. But there’s another way you can maintain your privacy: you can use private browsing.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode #173: Face ID with Masks, a sudo vulnerability, and Apple’s Privacy Labels

Apple is testing a new feature allowing users with Face ID iPhones to unlock them with their Apple Watch, if they’re wearing masks. There’s a vulnerability with the sudo command in various Unix distributions, including macOS. And we discuss how Apple’s privacy labels have been abused already by developers.

Subscribe to The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to switch search engines on macOS and iOS (and why you should)

If you’re like most people, you search the web a lot. Google handles nearly 85,000 searches per second, or 7.3 billion per day, or more than two and a half trillion searches every year. Your share of that may be small: if you’re just an average person, you may search the web 3-5 times a day, but some of us, such as writers, may perform several dozen searches in a single day when researching articles and books.

Searching the web is free. But nothing is really free. In exchange for providing you with such a powerful tool, Google collects data about you. It creates a unique profile of you, of your interests, your medical conditions (because everyone searches Google when they have health questions), and your browsing activity, and uses this to provide carefully targeted ads. It also tracks the websites you visit, ensuring not to miss anything you do.

This is why you often see ads related to your web searches. For example, you may have a question about your pet, and use Google to find the answer. You’ll soon see ads for pet food on various web pages. Google is the biggest advertising provider on the web, and millions of websites use Google Ads. So by storing information about you on Google’s servers, the company can know which ads are most likely to interest you. (Of course they don’t know if that search about the cat was really for a friend or neighbor, in which case the ads are incorrectly targeted, but if no one clicks, they don’t make any money.)

In other words, using a search engine is the same as giving away lots of private information about you, your habits, and your life. You may not want to do that.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.