Organize Your Scrivener Project with the Corkboard

Scrivener offers three ways to organize your projects: the Binder, the Outliner, and the Corkboard. We’ve looked at how you can Use Folders and Texts to Power Up the Scrivener Binder, and how you can Plan Your Project with Scrivener’s Outliner. We have also examined how you can outline with just the Binder.

Now it’s time to look at Scrivener’s third organizational tool, the Corkboard. Modeled after a real “analog” corkboard, Scrivener’s tool lets you arrange and rearrange virtual index cards in order to plan and organize your projects. Here’s how to work with the Corkboard.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Plan Your Project with Scrivener’s Outliner

Are you a planner or a pantser*? Do you meticulously flesh out the details of a story, novel, or screenplay, or do you just wing it? If you write non-fiction, do you itemize each chapter and section before you start writing?

If you do plan your work in advance, you may do so by creating an outline, and Scrivener’s built-in Outline mode is a powerful tool to prepare for writing. In addition, it interfaces with the Binder to allow you to immediately switch from outlining to writing.

In this article, I’m going to show you how you can outline with Scrivener, and how you can switch back and forth between your outline and the Binder as you progress in your project.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 9: Charlie Stross, Science-Fiction Author

Charlie Stross is a prolific author of science fiction and fantasy. He has written more than two dozen novels, has won three Hugo awards, and has been nominated for many other awards, including the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the Japanese Seiun Award.

Show notes:

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

How Many Different Types of Plots Are There?

Some say there are 6, 36, or 1,462 plots for stories, novels and screenplays. How many are there? Does it matter?

There has been much discussion over the years as to how many different types of plots, stories, or dramatic situations exist. While writers of fiction and screenplays may not want to plan their novels according to these templates, it’s a good idea to keep them in mind. Are there six, 36, or 1,462 different types of plots? Can you structure a story using a template?

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Use Scrivener Projects to Store Multiple Books or Articles

You can use Scrivener projects to store multiple books or articles, and even use them as an archive of your writings.

Scrivener projects are extremely flexible. You could write a very long novel, a collection of short stories, or a series of articles or blog posts in a Scrivener project. Since Scrivener projects use a folder and file metaphor for storing and arranging texts, they can be used with any type of writing, even screenplays and comics.

If you write books, you may think that the ideal way to work with Scrivener is to create a separate project for each book. But there may be advantages to storing all your books in the same project. If you write short stories, articles, or blog posts, Scrivener‘s organizational features are the best way for you to keep an archive of your writings in a single project.

In this article, I’ll discuss how you can work with multiple books or articles in the same project, how to split projects, and how to merge projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Scrivener and Microsoft Word: Importing & Exporting

You may need to import or export documents in Microsoft Word format to your Scrivener project. Here’s how.

Scrivener is the ideal tool for long-form writing, and you can build projects and compile them to many formats, from RTF and PDF to ebook formats that you can upload to online retailers. But many Scrivener users may need to export to Microsoft Word’s .docx format to send their projects to colleagues, agents, or editors, and you can save your project in that format if you need to. You may also need to import Microsoft Word documents to your projects, and you may want to split them so their different sections show up individually in the Binder.

In this article, I’m going to tell you how to work with Microsoft Word documents and Scrivener.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Outlining with the Scrivener Binder

Scrivener’s Binder is where you organize your projects, in folders and files, and this is reflected in the app’s dedicated Outline view. Many people like working in Outline view, because it’s a familiar way to view the elements of their projects. But you can also use the Binder to create an outline and rearrange it, and, in some cases, this is more powerful and flexible than the Outline view.

Scrivener is very different from other text editors or word processors; instead of working in monolithic files, your project can be split up into bits as long or as short as you want. (In practice, you probably don’t want snippets shorter than one paragraph.) Because of this, it’s easy to rearrange your project in the Binder.
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In this article, I’m going to discuss how you can use the Binder as an outline, and when you might want to do this.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Use Copyholders to Extend the Scrivener Editor

Scrivener’s Editor is a powerful tool for putting words down on a virtual page, and for viewing what you’ve already written. I recently showed how you can split the Editor, to view two files at the same time, whether they are part of your Draft or Manuscript folder, items in your Research folder, or anything else.

In addition to these Editor splits, Scrivener has a feature called copyholders. Think of these as pinning a file from the Binder to an Editor pane. Copyholders stay in place while you write, edit, and navigate in other Editor panes, until you remove them. And if you combine Editor splits and copyholders, you can have four files visible at a time.

Here’s how to use copyholders in Scrivener.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

See More of Your Project: Splitting the Scrivener Editor

Scrivener’s Editor is the part of the app where you do your writing. We’ve looked at how you can customize the Editor to make it fit your style, and we’ve explained how to use Scrivenings mode to view multiple texts consecutively in the Editor.

Scrivener’s Binder lets you build your writing project in sections, chapters, scenes, or fragments. But sometimes you need to see more than one part of your project. Unlike most writing apps, whose files are monolithic, leading you to scroll, scroll, scroll, when you want to go back to what you’ve written before, you can just click on another document in the Binder to do this.

But Scrivener’s Editor goes even further, allowing you to split the editor into two parts. You can write chapter 17 while looking back at what happened in chapter 3, to make sure that you get everything right.

In this article, I’ll tell how to split the Scrivener Editor.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 7: Maggie Shipstead, Booker Shortlisted Author of Great Circle

Maggie Shipstead’s latest novel has been shortlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize. Great Circle is a novel of love and loss and adventure, focusing on a woman pilot in the early days of flying, and an actress portraying her in the present.

Show notes:

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.