How to Customize Scrivener on iPad and iPhone

In last week’s article, I introduced Scrivener for iPad and iPhone. I discussed how practical it is to use Scrivener on the go, on a compact, portable device. The iOS and iPadOS versions of Scrivener don’t have all the features of the desktop app, but they offer the most important, allowing you to write and revise on your iPad, or even your iPhone.

In this article, I’ll show you how you can tweak Scrivener for iPad or iPhone to make it work the way you want. I’ll look at how you can adjust the way text displays in the Editor, and how you can adjust many of the other settings available, such as turning on dark mode, and more.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Get to Know Scrivener for iPad and iPhone

Scrivener for iPad and iPhone lets you work on your projects on mobile devices, and sync them back to your computer.

If you use Scrivener on a Mac or Windows computer, and haven’t yet discovered the Scrivener app for iOS and iPadOS, this series of articles about the mobile version of the app is for you. I’m going to show you how you can use Scrivener on an iPad or iPhone on its own, or in conjunction with Scrivener on your desktop or laptop computer.

In this week’s article, I’ll give you an introduction to Scrivener for iPad and iPhone, and tell you why you may want to use the mobile app. Future articles will look at how to tweak Scrivener on iPad and iPhone to work the way you want it, how to sync projects between the mobile apps and the desktop, and how to compile projects with the mobile apps.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

These Five Books Will Make You a Better Writer

Writing is something that most people learn on the hoof. While you can take writing courses, such as an MFA in Creative Writing or a journalism course, most writers are just born wordsmiths. As such, we can all benefit from books that help us hone our craft. There are hundreds of books about writing, some of which offer formulae for creating best sellers, others that focus on specific elements of writing (such as plot, dialog, or description), and some more general books that provide inspiration.

In this article, I look at a five books about writing that can help every writer.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Manage, Compare, and Restore Snapshots in Your Scrivener Projects

In a recent article, we looked to how you can use snapshots to save versions of your Scrivener projects. We explained what snapshots are, how they work, and how to take snapshots.

In this article, we want to go further, showing you what you can do with snapshots. We’ll look at how you can manage snapshots, how you can compare them to current versions of documents in your project, and how you can restore snapshots if you want to.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Use Snapshots in Scrivener to Save Versions of Your Projects

As you certainly know, it’s essential to back up your Scrivener projects so you don’t lose any of your hard work. Scrivener makes automatic backups to your computer, but it is important to also back up your files to an external drive or cloud service, in case you have problems with your computer. See How to Back Up Your Scrivener Projects for more on backing up projects.

Another useful Scrivener feature to protect your data is snapshots, which back up versions of your documents. You can use snapshots to look back at a previous version, before you edited it or cut text, and restore all or part of it if you’ve changed your mind.

In this article, I’ll explain how snapshots work, and why you should use them frequently when working in Scrivener. In a future article, I’ll look at how you can manage, compare, and restore snapshots in your Scrivener projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 15: Rowan Hooper, Science Writer

Rowan Hooper is a science writer, and is currently podcast editor for The New Scientist. His book, How to Save the World for Just a Trillion Dollars, looks at ten big problems in the world and how they can be solved for a trillion dollars.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Got the Blank Page Blues? Take a Walk. How Walking Boosts Creativity.

Whether you write short-form or long-form works, fiction or non-fiction, no writer is immune from the blank-page blues. We all hit a point when the ideas just don’t come. It’s almost as if the brain, at times, is like a silo, whose grain has depleted and needs to be refilled.

There are many ways to jump-start your creativity in situations like this. Naps are a great way to give the mind a rest and start afresh. Using writing prompts can help your brain make new connections. But one method of replenishing the brain has been used for centuries, and has been shown by science to help you be more creative: walking.

In this article, I’ll explain why a walk – short or long – can be just what you need to move ahead when you hit the hurdle of the blank page.\Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Check Grammar in Your Scrivener Projects with ProWritingAid

When you write in Scrivener on Mac or Windows, you benefit from the spelling and grammar checking features available in those operating systems. But, as you know, these tools are not always comprehensive. They do generally highlight spelling errors, but for grammar, they can be limited.

There are a number of grammar checkers available, such as Grammarly, Ginger, Scribens, and others, but these tools require that you either paste text into a browser or use their apps. Only one grammar checker integrates with Scrivener: ProWritingAid.

In this article – which is not a sponsored post – I’ll look at how ProWritingAid works with Scrivener, and how you can improve your writing with this tool.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Find and Replace Text in Your Scrivener Projects

As you progress in your project, you may need to find specific words or phrases. For example, you may want to find a specific section of your work to recall what a character did or said, and you may remember certain words that you can search for. Or, in a non-fiction book, you may want to find a specific date to check something. And, if you decide to change the name of a character, it’s easiest to do this in one operation, finding the original name and replacing it with the new name.

Like all word processors, Scrivener has a find and replace feature. Scrivener’s find options are powerful, and allow you to search for more than just isolated words and phrases. In this article, I’ll tell you how to leverage find and replace in your Scrivener projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.