Customize the Scrivener Editor 3 – Use Styles to Format Your Scrivener Projects

In previous articles about customizing the Scrivener editor, I discussed setting up the Editor space, and customizing fonts in the Editor. This week I want to talk about using styles to format your Scrivener projects.

Styles are combinations of settings for text that you can use and re-use for consistency, and for ease of formatting, in your projects. Styles go beyond just customizing the Editor, and are one of the most powerful tools you can use to format projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Customize the Scrivener Editor 2 – Adjusting Fonts in the Editor

In last week’s article, I explained how you can tweak the Editor to make it more comfortable to use. I discussed zooming to change the display, setting the Editor width, and adjusting margins, along with some other elements that you can change in Scrivener’s options.

This week, I want to discuss how you can work with fonts in the Editor: how to change the font, size, alignment, and more. Most writers want to set fonts once and for all, and never change them, and I’ll show you how to set the defaults for new projects.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Customize the Scrivener Editor 1 – Setting Up the Editor

The Editor is the section in the Scrivener window where you do your writing. While the Binder and Inspector are important, because the former helps you structure your projects, and the latter lets you store additional information about your texts, the Editor is where you probably spend the most time when working with Scrivener.

It’s important to be able to make the Editor fit your style of working, to help you forget its presence so you can just focus on the words you write. You do this by adjusting how the Editor and your text display.

In this article, I discuss adjusting the Editor view in general, and in future articles I’ll look at font settings, how to use styles, how to set up tabs and margins, and more.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode No. 4: Annik Lafarge, Author of Chasing Chopin

After a career in publishing, from being a publicist to senior editor, Annik Lafarge is now a consultant and advisor to authors. Her latest book is Chasing Chopin: A Musical Journey Across Three Centuries, Four Countries, and a Half-Dozen Revolutions. Annik talks about how important it is for authors to help market their books.

“I honestly don’t think I could have written this book without without Scrivener.”

Read more on the Scrivener Blog.

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Use Quick Reference Windows to View Multiple Parts of Scrivener Projects

A Scrivener project can be simple, with a couple of folders and files, or it can be quite complex, with chapters, scenes, character sheets, and research. The main Scrivener interface is designed to help you navigate and display these various elements, but the Editor generally only shows one item.

Sometimes you need to refer to other items in your project. You may want to keep tabs on your character sheets, either to ensure that your descriptions are consistent, or to add more information to them. If you store research in your Scrivener project, you almost certainly need to check details from time to time.

Scrivener lets you use Quick Reference windows to view any element of your project when you need it, without changing what’s visible in the Editor. Here’s how to use Quick Reference windows.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Saving Scrivener Projects

When you work in most apps, you need to save your work, to ensure that it gets written to disk. This is especially important when you’re creating something, such as writing an article or book; you can’t easily reproduce your work if you don’t save it. If you don’t regularly save your work, you may lose it if your computer crashes or if your battery dies.

Saving is one of the more basic features in an app like Scrivener, but there are a few things to know about how Scrivener automatically saves your work, and what happens when you choose Save As from the File menu.

In this article I’ll tell you about auto-saving Scrivener projects, using Save As to create a copy of your project, and some other information about saving and duplicating files.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Manage Your Characters in Scrivener

When you’re writing fiction, your novel will have characters. There might be just a single character, or it could have dozens, like a Dickens novel that teems with a wide variety of people. Scrivener’s fiction and scriptwriting projects have a special section in the Binder where you can store character sketches, specially formatted documents you can use to flesh out and store information about your characters. And if you can’t come up with good names for your characters, Scrivener even has a built-in tool to help you find them.

Here’s how to work with characters in Scrivener.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

The Philosophy of Scrivener

Scrivener is very different from other word processors or text editors. Word processors are designed to be multi-tool text machines for use in the office or at home, to create all types of documents from reports to letters, from flyers to white papers. Text editors are generally designed for writing short texts, or for writing code. Because of this, many creative writers feel constrained when working with these tools. As the introduction to the Scrivener manual says, “Scrivener is designed to be flexible, to adapt to the writers’s workflow, not the other way around.”

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener Podcast, Episode No. 3: J.T. Ellison, Thriller Author

J.T. Ellison has written more than 25 novels: standalone thrillers, three series, and has recently published the first in a series of co-authored young adult novels. She co-hosts a literary TV show, and is also a publisher. She also “loves Scrivener with the passion of a thousand fiery suns.”

Show notes:

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Personalize the Scrivener Binder with Custom Icons

The Binder is the heart of your Scrivener projects. It’s where you build the structure of your work, whether it’s a novel, essay, or screenplay, and it’s a constant reminder of how your project is formed. Some people may only use a couple of folders and texts in the Binder, and others may break down their projects into dozens of elements.

The ability to use folders and texts in the Binder is one of Scrivener’s most powerful features. But when you’re working on a complex project, it can be helpful if the Binder gives you some visual idea of what these items contain. Scrivener sets bland folder and file icons for the Binder’s elements by default, but you can modify these, using dozens of alternate icons, and even add your own. Here’s how.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.