Outlining with the Scrivener Binder

Scrivener’s Binder is where you organize your projects, in folders and files, and this is reflected in the app’s dedicated Outline view. Many people like working in Outline view, because it’s a familiar way to view the elements of their projects. But you can also use the Binder to create an outline and rearrange it, and, in some cases, this is more powerful and flexible than the Outline view.

Scrivener is very different from other text editors or word processors; instead of working in monolithic files, your project can be split up into bits as long or as short as you want. (In practice, you probably don’t want snippets shorter than one paragraph.) Because of this, it’s easy to rearrange your project in the Binder.
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In this article, I’m going to discuss how you can use the Binder as an outline, and when you might want to do this.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Use Copyholders to Extend the Scrivener Editor

Scrivener’s Editor is a powerful tool for putting words down on a virtual page, and for viewing what you’ve already written. I recently showed how you can split the Editor, to view two files at the same time, whether they are part of your Draft or Manuscript folder, items in your Research folder, or anything else.

In addition to these Editor splits, Scrivener has a feature called copyholders. Think of these as pinning a file from the Binder to an Editor pane. Copyholders stay in place while you write, edit, and navigate in other Editor panes, until you remove them. And if you combine Editor splits and copyholders, you can have four files visible at a time.

Here’s how to use copyholders in Scrivener.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

See More of Your Project: Splitting the Scrivener Editor

Scrivener’s Editor is the part of the app where you do your writing. We’ve looked at how you can customize the Editor to make it fit your style, and we’ve explained how to use Scrivenings mode to view multiple texts consecutively in the Editor.

Scrivener’s Binder lets you build your writing project in sections, chapters, scenes, or fragments. But sometimes you need to see more than one part of your project. Unlike most writing apps, whose files are monolithic, leading you to scroll, scroll, scroll, when you want to go back to what you’ve written before, you can just click on another document in the Binder to do this.

But Scrivener’s Editor goes even further, allowing you to split the editor into two parts. You can write chapter 17 while looking back at what happened in chapter 3, to make sure that you get everything right.

In this article, I’ll tell how to split the Scrivener Editor.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 7: Maggie Shipstead, Booker Shortlisted Author of Great Circle

Maggie Shipstead’s latest novel has been shortlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize. Great Circle is a novel of love and loss and adventure, focusing on a woman pilot in the early days of flying, and an actress portraying her in the present.

Show notes:

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Use Scrivener’s Research Folder to Store Information About Your Project

Every Scrivener project has three root folders: Draft (or Manuscript, in some templates), Research, and Trash. Other project templates have additional folders, such as Characters, Places, Front Matter, Notes, and others, but these three folders are present in every project.

The Research folder is one of the elements that makes Scrivener such a powerful tool for writing. Instead of having documents strewn on your computer’s desktop, or stashed away in various folders, you can store all the research you need for your project so you can access it quickly, without switching to another app.

In this article, I’m going to tell you about the Research folder: which types of files it can store, how to use it efficiently, and how to ensure that it doesn’t make your project get too large.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 6: Elizabeth Haynes, Thriller Author

Having worked as a police intelligence analyst in the UK, Elizabeth Haynes knows a lot about crime. She has written a half dozen novels, all of which she started during NaNoWriMo.

Read more on the Scrivener Blog.

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

10 Steps to Get Started with Scrivener for NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo is just around the corner. In a couple of weeks, the annual National Novel Writing Month will begin, and authors will attempt to write 50,000 words of a new novel in 30 days. Scrivener has been a NaNoWriMo sponsor for 12 years, and will be again offering an extended trial version of the app for Mac or Windows to all NaNoWriMo participants. At the end of the month, you’ll be able to purchase Scrivener with a 20% discount, and if you reach the 50,000 word milestone, you’ll get a 50% discount. Learn more about the Scrivener NaNoWriMo trial version here.

You can also download a special NaNoWriMo template for Scrivener, with a preset 50,000-word target, and, this year, the NaNoWriMo template can sync with your NaNoWriMo account, allowing you to update your word count from Scrivener with a single click.

Scrivener is different from other word processors: its underlying philosophy sets it apart from other apps. Scrivener is designed for long-form writing projects, either fiction or non-fiction, as well as for screenplays. Read about the philosophy of Scrivener to understand why this app is ideal for writing your novel.

Here are 10 tips to help you get started with Scrivener and reach your 50,000-word goal, with links to articles about Scrivener on the Literature & Latte blog.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

View and Edit Multiple Documents with Scrivenings

One reason many people like Scrivener is that, unlike most word processors, you don’t have to constantly scroll back and forth to see different parts of your work. When you’re writing chapter 17, and need to see what a character did in chapter 5, you don’t have to scroll, scroll, scroll, but just click the folder or document for that chapter in the Binder.

Yet there are times when you do want to read more than just a single Binder document. This could be the case if you split your chapters into folders, and, in each folder, have different documents for each scene; or if you want to do one final proofreading pass on your entire project, from start to finish.

Scrivener has the catchily-titled Scrivenings feature, which allows you to view multiple documents as though they were one. Here’s how.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

5 Tips for Customizing the Scrivener Editor

In recent articles, I’ve looked at how you can customize the Scrivener Editor. I began by explaining how you can set up the editor to your liking, then discussed how to choose default font settings so all your documents look the way you want, and then I introduced styles, showing how you could go beyond the basic font settings.

In today’s article, I want to present a few additional tips you can use to make the Editor work efficiently for you.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Customize the Scrivener Editor 3 – Use Styles to Format Your Scrivener Projects

In previous articles about customizing the Scrivener editor, I discussed setting up the Editor space, and customizing fonts in the Editor. This week I want to talk about using styles to format your Scrivener projects.

Styles are combinations of settings for text that you can use and re-use for consistency, and for ease of formatting, in your projects. Styles go beyond just customizing the Editor, and are one of the most powerful tools you can use to format projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.