Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 11: Charles Shields, Biographer

Charles Shields is a biographer of mid-century American novelists and writers. After a career teaching, and writing histories and biographies for young people, Shields has written several biographies of American authors, the most recent of which is about playwright Lorraine Hansberry, author of Raisin in the Sun.

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Use Scrivener’s Word Frequency Statistics to Refine Your Writing

Your Scrivener projects are full of words; thousands of them, perhaps even hundreds of thousands of them. You use a lot of words often – the, and, is, that, and other common words. If you write a novel, you use the names of your characters often, and in non-fiction, there will be certain words relating to your project that appear often.

Scrivener’s statistics provides a word frequency count: it shows you how many times you’ve used each word in your project. In this article, I’m going to explain how to use this feature, and why you might want to use it.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Write Without Distractions with Scrivener

When you write, you need to focus on your work. If you are distracted while thinking about scenes and characters, you may not be able to create as fluently as you want. Some people need a quiet room with a nice view, others can work in the hustle and bustle of a coffee shop, but the main sort of distraction writers face is on their computers.

In this article, I’m going to discuss how you can set up your computer so you aren’t distracted, and how you can use Scrivener to view a minimalist interface so you can focus on your words, and nothing else.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Printing with Scrivener

Some writers can do all their work on a screen: writing, revising, proofreading, and final preparation. But others like to print out their work to make changes and edits. Scrivener offers a number of options for printing all or part of a project, and in this article, I’ll tell you everything about printing with Scrivener.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 10: Annie Finch, Poet, Writer, and Witch

Annie Finch is a poet, writer, critic, editor, playwright, librettist, translator, and witch. She has written poetry, criticism, memoirs, and works on meter and form, and is the founder of Poetry Witch Community, where she teaches meter, scansion, and magic.

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Integrating Scrivener’s Binder, Corkboard, and Outliner

Scrivener’s philosophy is based on the awareness that many, if not most, writers don’t write long works from beginning to end, but rather jump around and build their projects in a non-linear manner. You write in the Editor, but Scrivener has three main ways to organize and rearrange your project: the Binder, Corkboard, and Outliner.

In recent articles, we’ve looked at how to power up the Binder, understanding how folders and texts work; how to use the Corkboard to brainstorm and rearrange your project; and how to plan your project using the Outliner.

In this article, I’m going to discuss how you can integrate these three powerful organizational tools when working on Scrivener projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

Organize Your Scrivener Project with the Corkboard

Scrivener offers three ways to organize your projects: the Binder, the Outliner, and the Corkboard. We’ve looked at how you can Use Folders and Texts to Power Up the Scrivener Binder, and how you can Plan Your Project with Scrivener’s Outliner. We have also examined how you can outline with just the Binder.

Now it’s time to look at Scrivener’s third organizational tool, the Corkboard. Modeled after a real “analog” corkboard, Scrivener’s tool lets you arrange and rearrange virtual index cards in order to plan and organize your projects. Here’s how to work with the Corkboard.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Plan Your Project with Scrivener’s Outliner

Are you a planner or a pantser*? Do you meticulously flesh out the details of a story, novel, or screenplay, or do you just wing it? If you write non-fiction, do you itemize each chapter and section before you start writing?

If you do plan your work in advance, you may do so by creating an outline, and Scrivener’s built-in Outline mode is a powerful tool to prepare for writing. In addition, it interfaces with the Binder to allow you to immediately switch from outlining to writing.

In this article, I’m going to show you how you can outline with Scrivener, and how you can switch back and forth between your outline and the Binder as you progress in your project.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 9: Charlie Stross, Science-Fiction Author

Charlie Stross is a prolific author of science fiction and fantasy. He has written more than two dozen novels, has won three Hugo awards, and has been nominated for many other awards, including the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the Japanese Seiun Award.

Show notes:

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

How Many Different Types of Plots Are There?

Some say there are 6, 36, or 1,462 plots for stories, novels and screenplays. How many are there? Does it matter?

There has been much discussion over the years as to how many different types of plots, stories, or dramatic situations exist. While writers of fiction and screenplays may not want to plan their novels according to these templates, it’s a good idea to keep them in mind. Are there six, 36, or 1,462 different types of plots? Can you structure a story using a template?

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.