Use Bookmarks in Scrivener Projects to Link to Internal and External Files

Your Scrivener project is a container for a lot of things. It contains your manuscript, with its files, folders, and sub-folders, but it also contains elements like character and place documents, research, front and back matter, and more. Rather than thinking of it as a file, you should think of it as a package.

If you store a lot in your Scrivener project, especially if you have a lot of research, it can get very large, making it harder to move around and back up.

In this article, I’ll tell you how you can use bookmarks to link to items in your projects, to access them easily, and how to link to files on your computer but not add them to your Scrivener project.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Should you Outline Your Novel or Not?

There is no more contentious issue around writing fiction than whether an author should outline their novel or not. Planners – those who outline – insist that it’s the only way to write, whereas pantsers – those who write “on the seat of their pants” – claim that their way is best.

Of course, neither is best, but each of these approaches suits different writers. There are valid reasons for and against each choice. Here are some of them.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 20: Brigitta Blair and Camilla Zhang on Writing Comics with Scrivener

Brigitta Blair is an author/illustrator, and Camilla Zhang is a comics editor. Together they have created the Standard Comic Strip Template for Scrivener. We discussed comics, how they are made, and how the Scrivener template helps comic authors.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Outline your NaNoWriMo Novel Using the Save the Cat! Story Structure

If you’re planning to participate in this years National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), or if you are just getting ready to start writing a novel, there are two ways to approach the task. You could be a pantser – a writer who progresses “by the seat of their pants,” without any planning – or you could be a planner, someone who prepares an outline, which could be just key points, or granular details. Or, you could be a plantser, someone who uses a bit of each approach.

If you do want to plan your novel, one good way to do so is to use the Save the Cat! story structure. Even if you are a pantser, examining your completed first draft through the lens of this structure can help you revise your novel.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Blogging with Scrivener

Most people think of Scrivener as a tool for long-form writing, and that’s where it stands hand and shoulders above other software. But you can also use Scrivener for writing short texts, such as articles or blog posts. In addition to being a tool for writing articles, Scrivener can organize your blog posts, providing a library of all you have written.

Here’s how to blog with Scrivener.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Find the Right Words

Writing well is all about finding the right words. A simple, concise description is much more effective than one that drags on. Clear, authentic dialog is more realistic than long expositions. Sometimes, a single word, at the right place, can make all the difference between a middling story and a masterpiece.

Finding the right word isn’t always easy. Fortunately, we have some useful tools that can help us out.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Compile Scrivener Projects on iPad and iPhone

In recent articles about using Scrivener on iPad and iPhone, I’ve discussed the app’s interface, explained how you can customize Scrivener on a mobile device, shown how to create and manage projects, and looked at how to sync projects between an iPhone or iPad and a computer. In this article, I will explain how you compile projects.

Compiling Scrivener projects is what you do when you want to move on to the next step: to send them to an editor or agent, or to a writing buddy, so someone can read your draft or finished work. Here’s how to compile a Scrivener project on an iPad or iPhone.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.