How to Manage Your Characters in Scrivener

When you’re writing fiction, your novel will have characters. There might be just a single character, or it could have dozens, like a Dickens novel that teems with a wide variety of people. Scrivener’s fiction and scriptwriting projects have a special section in the Binder where you can store character sketches, specially formatted documents you can use to flesh out and store information about your characters. And if you can’t come up with good names for your characters, Scrivener even has a built-in tool to help you find them.

Here’s how to work with characters in Scrivener.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

The Philosophy of Scrivener

Scrivener is very different from other word processors or text editors. Word processors are designed to be multi-tool text machines for use in the office or at home, to create all types of documents from reports to letters, from flyers to white papers. Text editors are generally designed for writing short texts, or for writing code. Because of this, many creative writers feel constrained when working with these tools. As the introduction to the Scrivener manual says, “Scrivener is designed to be flexible, to adapt to the writers’s workflow, not the other way around.”

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener Podcast, Episode No. 3: J.T. Ellison, Thriller Author

J.T. Ellison has written more than 25 novels: standalone thrillers, three series, and has recently published the first in a series of co-authored young adult novels. She co-hosts a literary TV show, and is also a publisher. She also “loves Scrivener with the passion of a thousand fiery suns.”

Show notes:

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Personalize the Scrivener Binder with Custom Icons

The Binder is the heart of your Scrivener projects. It’s where you build the structure of your work, whether it’s a novel, essay, or screenplay, and it’s a constant reminder of how your project is formed. Some people may only use a couple of folders and texts in the Binder, and others may break down their projects into dozens of elements.

The ability to use folders and texts in the Binder is one of Scrivener’s most powerful features. But when you’re working on a complex project, it can be helpful if the Binder gives you some visual idea of what these items contain. Scrivener sets bland folder and file icons for the Binder’s elements by default, but you can modify these, using dozens of alternate icons, and even add your own. Here’s how.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Syncing Scrivener Projects to the Cloud

One of the best things about modern computing is the availability of “the cloud,” allowing us to sync files from device to device without using floppy discs, thumb drives, or complex network connections to file servers. With cloud services such as Dropbox, iCloud Drive, One Drive, and others, this syncing mostly just works. You put files in a folder on your computer, and they sync to the cloud, and you can access the same files on another computer or device.

But when you’re syncing Scrivener projects to cloud services, there are some rules to respect. Here’s how you can use Scrivener with the cloud.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Journaling with Scrivener

Scrivener is ideal for developing and writing long-form projects, but the unique nature of the Scrivener writing environment makes it an ideal tool for journaling. You can create a Scrivener project to use as your daily journal, recording your thoughts, notes, and the events in your life. Here’s how.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode No. 2: Dan Moren, Science Fiction Author, Journalist, and Podcaster

Dan Moren juggles a triple career: that of a science fiction author, tech journalist, and podcaster. He discusses his the “sci-fi espionage capers” he writes, how he transitioned from journalism to fiction, and how he has used Scrivener to write each of his novels.

Read more on the Scrivener Blog.

Learn more about Scrivener, and check out the ebook Take Control of Scrivener.

If you like the podcast, please follow it in Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app. Leave a rating or review, and tell your friends. And check out past episodes of Write Now with Scrivener.

Distraction-Free Writing with Scrivener

It’s hard to work on a computer these days. With lots of windows, notifications from your email and social media apps, and other distractions, it’s hard to stay focused. When you’re writing in Scrivener, whether you’re working on a novel, a thesis, or a play, you want to give your full attention to your work, and not be distracted by a friend who just sent a link to another cute cat video… (Though, to be fair, watching cute cat videos is a good way to take a break, when it’s the right time.)

Scrivener has a few features that let you shut out the rest of what’s happening on your computer and write without distractions. Here’s how to use Composition Mode, and more.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Back Up Your Scrivener Projects

Thomas Carlyle once asked his friend John Stuart Mill to read the manuscript of his History of the French Revolution. Mill took it home, and later claimed that his maid had used it to start fires. It’s not clear if this is true, or if Mill kept the manuscript for himself, since he had plans to write about the same topic. But Carlyle didn’t have a backup, and he had to start all over and rewrite the book.

With computers, we don’t have to worry so much about our work being used as kindling, but we do need to ensure that we have backups in case of other problems, such as computer crashes, disk failure, or theft. Fortunately, it’s a lot easier today to back up computer files, and to back them up in multiple locations. Ideally, for important work, you should back up your work following the 3-2-1 rule.

  • Have 3 copies of your work – the original data, plus two backups
  • Store the files on 2 different types of media – computer, external drive, etc.
  • Keep 1 copy offsite – in a different physical location, or in the cloud

Just think of how much time you’d lose if your Scrivener projects got lost; you may never be able to rewrite them.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.