How to Manage, Compare, and Restore Snapshots in Your Scrivener Projects

In a recent article, we looked to how you can use snapshots to save versions of your Scrivener projects. We explained what snapshots are, how they work, and how to take snapshots.

In this article, we want to go further, showing you what you can do with snapshots. We’ll look at how you can manage snapshots, how you can compare them to current versions of documents in your project, and how you can restore snapshots if you want to.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Use Snapshots in Scrivener to Save Versions of Your Projects

As you certainly know, it’s essential to back up your Scrivener projects so you don’t lose any of your hard work. Scrivener makes automatic backups to your computer, but it is important to also back up your files to an external drive or cloud service, in case you have problems with your computer. See How to Back Up Your Scrivener Projects for more on backing up projects.

Another useful Scrivener feature to protect your data is snapshots, which back up versions of your documents. You can use snapshots to look back at a previous version, before you edited it or cut text, and restore all or part of it if you’ve changed your mind.

In this article, I’ll explain how snapshots work, and why you should use them frequently when working in Scrivener. In a future article, I’ll look at how you can manage, compare, and restore snapshots in your Scrivener projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 15: Rowan Hooper, Science Writer

Rowan Hooper is a science writer, and is currently podcast editor for The New Scientist. His book, How to Save the World for Just a Trillion Dollars, looks at ten big problems in the world and how they can be solved for a trillion dollars.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Got the Blank Page Blues? Take a Walk. How Walking Boosts Creativity.

Whether you write short-form or long-form works, fiction or non-fiction, no writer is immune from the blank-page blues. We all hit a point when the ideas just don’t come. It’s almost as if the brain, at times, is like a silo, whose grain has depleted and needs to be refilled.

There are many ways to jump-start your creativity in situations like this. Naps are a great way to give the mind a rest and start afresh. Using writing prompts can help your brain make new connections. But one method of replenishing the brain has been used for centuries, and has been shown by science to help you be more creative: walking.

In this article, I’ll explain why a walk – short or long – can be just what you need to move ahead when you hit the hurdle of the blank page.\Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Check Grammar in Your Scrivener Projects with ProWritingAid

When you write in Scrivener on Mac or Windows, you benefit from the spelling and grammar checking features available in those operating systems. But, as you know, these tools are not always comprehensive. They do generally highlight spelling errors, but for grammar, they can be limited.

There are a number of grammar checkers available, such as Grammarly, Ginger, Scribens, and others, but these tools require that you either paste text into a browser or use their apps. Only one grammar checker integrates with Scrivener: ProWritingAid.

In this article – which is not a sponsored post – I’ll look at how ProWritingAid works with Scrivener, and how you can improve your writing with this tool.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Find and Replace Text in Your Scrivener Projects

As you progress in your project, you may need to find specific words or phrases. For example, you may want to find a specific section of your work to recall what a character did or said, and you may remember certain words that you can search for. Or, in a non-fiction book, you may want to find a specific date to check something. And, if you decide to change the name of a character, it’s easiest to do this in one operation, finding the original name and replacing it with the new name.

Like all word processors, Scrivener has a find and replace feature. Scrivener’s find options are powerful, and allow you to search for more than just isolated words and phrases. In this article, I’ll tell you how to leverage find and replace in your Scrivener projects.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Write Now with Scrivener, Episode no. 14: Jessica Payne, Thriller Author

Jessica Payne has just published her first novel, Make Me Disappear, a psychological thriller about a woman who arranges her own kidnapping. Jessica is the host of #MomsWritersClub, on YouTube and Twitter, where she discusses the issues around writing and being a mom.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How to Use Front and Back Matter when You Compile Your Scrivener Projects

When a book is published, in addition to the text and/or images it contains, there is also front matter and back matter. Front matter includes such things as a title page, the author’s name, copyright information, and may include a table of contents, a dedication, acknowledgments, and a forward, preface, or introduction.

Back matter varies a lot according to the type of book. In some cases, there is no back matter, or simply information about the author. In others, there is an afterword, an appendix, notes, an index, a glossary, bibliography, and more.

Both of these are essential if you are self-publishing a book, and Scrivener allows you to integrate this information easily when you compile your project.

In this article, I’ll look at front and back matter, and how Scrivener handles them when you compile a project.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Use Dialogue Focus and Linguistic Focus to Revise and Edit Your Writing in Scrivener

As your write a work in Scrivener, or when you get to the revision stage, you might want to focus on certain types of sentences and words to ensure that your writing sounds correct. When you write fiction, you especially want to pay attention to dialog; it should not only sound natural, but there should be a flow, a give and take among characters as they converse.

Scrivener’s Dialogue Focus tool gives you a close-up look at your dialog, so you can make sure it flows properly. And other Linguistic Focus tools, available in the Mac version of Scrivener, let you check how often you use different parts of speech: nouns, verbs, adverbs, etc.

In this article, I’ll show you how you can use these tools when writing and editing to make sure that your words sparkle.

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.

How Naps Can Jump-Start Your Creativity

When you’re staring at a blank page, trying to figure out where to start a project, or where to take the next scene of a novel, you may find that the best way to get your creative mojo back is to take a nap. As counter-productive as it sounds, naps can boost creativity.

Napping isn’t just about resting. Naps reset your brain by sending it through a period of nonrapid eye movement (or N1) sleep. Naps don’t have to be long; even a brief nap can boost your creativity, because this “twilight zone between sleep and wakefulness” is where the brain weaves complicated stories. A recent study showed that even 15 seconds of N1 sleep was enough to help participants solve mathematical problems.

So, should you nap to turbocharge your writing?

Read the rest of the article on The L&L Blog.

To learn how to use Scrivener for Mac, Windows, and iOS, check out my book Take Control of Scrivener 3.