The 10,000 Track Limit: Why I Switched from Spotify to Apple Music – TidBITS

Say what you will about the deluge of subscriptions, but I like subscribing to a streaming music service so I can explore music without the stress of having to decide if I want to buy any particular track.

[…]

but the straw that broke the camel’s back was when I ran headfirst into Spotify’s 10,000 track limit. You read that right — despite the fact that Spotify is a streaming service that contains over 30 million tracks, you cannot add more than 10,000 to your collection. This utterly arbitrary limit was a true deal-breaker.

I had no idea that Spotify had a 10,000-track limit. We groaned back in the day when iTunes Match was launched with a 25,000-track limit, and we sighed with relief when that was increased, both for iTunes Match and Apple Music – to 100,000 tracks. Naturally, it’s a bit different, since Apple’s services let you upload your own library. But since with Spotify you don’t use any of their server space, why have such a low limit?

Someone at Apple told me a few years ago that the average user has a library of a few thousand tracks. But, again, this is a combination of their own music and music they’ve added from Apple Music. With a service like this, which allows you to listen to millions of tracks, how can they limit your collection to 10,000?

Source: The 10,000 Track Limit: Why I Switched from Spotify to Apple Music – TidBITS

12 thoughts on “The 10,000 Track Limit: Why I Switched from Spotify to Apple Music – TidBITS

  1. It would be useful to have someone’s reassessment of Apple Music. To what extent have they fixed the problems of the early days? I got a real scare when it started re-tagging my music library (changing the format of composers’ names etc) and I haven’t gone near it since. But meanwhile, if I’m honest, I’ve come to enjoy the streaming experience from Spotify so much, the CD collection has been gathering dust both literally (in the attic) and metaphorically. I wasn’t aware of Spotify’s track limit and I certainly haven’t hit it (yet).

    • I will not let Apple Music match my library. Are use it to stream, but I do not use iCloud music library.

      • Well it’s good to know that you have that option. Thanks. Maybe I will give Apple Music another try. If you ever feel like giving us a full reappraisal of AM in one of your future blogs, I for one would read it with great interest!

  2. It would be useful to have someone’s reassessment of Apple Music. To what extent have they fixed the problems of the early days? I got a real scare when it started re-tagging my music library (changing the format of composers’ names etc) and I haven’t gone near it since. But meanwhile, if I’m honest, I’ve come to enjoy the streaming experience from Spotify so much, the CD collection has been gathering dust both literally (in the attic) and metaphorically. I wasn’t aware of Spotify’s track limit and I certainly haven’t hit it (yet).

    • I will not let Apple Music match my library. Are use it to stream, but I do not use iCloud music library.

      • Well it’s good to know that you have that option. Thanks. Maybe I will give Apple Music another try. If you ever feel like giving us a full reappraisal of AM in one of your future blogs, I for one would read it with great interest!

  3. As I recall, when AM was introduced, it was all about uploading (one’s library – to be accessible from all your devices) rather than downloading. I guess that’s changed.

  4. As I recall, when AM was introduced, it was all about uploading (one’s library – to be accessible from all your devices) rather than downloading. I guess that’s changed.

  5. To me, it all seems part of Spotify’s grander scheme of making it harder for users to discover music on their own, so they’ll listen to more of the paid-for, promoted playlists.

    Anybody who has been using Spotify for a few years will know that this change in direction has been painfully obvious lately. Countless features related to music discovery, social features and sharing, following artists etc. have been suddenly removed from the app. A good dozen or so features I once used heavily in Spotify, have simply disappeared without replacement.

    To give just a few major examples: Spotify removed the ability to follow your favourite artists. Well, technically you can still follow them, but the point of that was to get notified when those artists released new tracks. However, Spotify have removed those notifications, so you won’t hear about those releases anymore. They have also removed the messaging system, so you can no longer share tracks or playlists with friends.

    The 10K track limit fits very well into that strategy. Keep up the façade of a huge, open, searchable library that gives streaming access to everything, but make it as hard as possible for people to discover music through social channels or through their own tastes and collections. Then, cue the constant bombardment with official playlists, where artists and labels can pay for placement, and see many users take the easy way out by just listening to those instead. These days, being in a popular, official Spotify playlist can literally make careers and a lot of money.

    Spotify started out as a nice idea, but it ended up being just another iteration on the payola principle.

    • Good point about the paid playlists. They are doing their best to promote those, and they may have a deal where they pay record labels less for them.

  6. To me, it all seems part of Spotify’s grander scheme of making it harder for users to discover music on their own, so they’ll listen to more of the paid-for, promoted playlists.

    Anybody who has been using Spotify for a few years will know that this change in direction has been painfully obvious lately. Countless features related to music discovery, social features and sharing, following artists etc. have been suddenly removed from the app. A good dozen or so features I once used heavily in Spotify, have simply disappeared without replacement.

    To give just a few major examples: Spotify removed the ability to follow your favourite artists. Well, technically you can still follow them, but the point of that was to get notified when those artists released new tracks. However, Spotify have removed those notifications, so you won’t hear about those releases anymore. They have also removed the messaging system, so you can no longer share tracks or playlists with friends.

    The 10K track limit fits very well into that strategy. Keep up the façade of a huge, open, searchable library that gives streaming access to everything, but make it as hard as possible for people to discover music through social channels or through their own tastes and collections. Then, cue the constant bombardment with official playlists, where artists and labels can pay for placement, and see many users take the easy way out by just listening to those instead. These days, being in a popular, official Spotify playlist can literally make careers and a lot of money.

    Spotify started out as a nice idea, but it ended up being just another iteration on the payola principle.

    • Good point about the paid playlists. They are doing their best to promote those, and they may have a deal where they pay record labels less for them.

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