The Dark Tower Review Roundup – Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood has been trying to adapt Stephen King’s eight-book saga for well over a decade, but the first film adaptation left the critics underwhelmed.

The Dark Tower reviews are in and the critical consensus can charitably be summed up with one word: meh.

I had been looking forward to this movie, being a big fan of the books, but everything I’ve heard about it has made me want to avoid it. Not only because it may be a truly bad movie, but because seeing it will change the way I see the characters and locations the next time I read the series. This has happened with the Lord of the Rings. I used to reread those books every ten years or so, but the last time I tried, I had too many images from the films – which, in this case, were very good – that ruined the novel.

Source: The Dark Tower Review Roundup | Hollywood Reporter

2 thoughts on “The Dark Tower Review Roundup – Hollywood Reporter

  1. The whole “the movie is not like I imagined the novel” thing is an interesting phenomena.

    Doesn’t seem to apply to plays as much, maybe because I have read many more plays than I have seen performed. You expect to see a play performed different times with different actors anyway. Also, a play being read fills in the environment very sparsely, if at all. A novel does much more setup outside of dialogue and character action, so that too may be not quite how you imagined it when you see the movie.

    What’s critical for me is which I did first. “The Expanse”, “American Gods”, and “The Handmaid’s Tale” are three recent examples.

    I read “Expanse” novels before the TV show. I imagined the characters of Holden and Miller quite differently from the TV show versions, but the actress they hired to do Naomi was exactly how I imagined her. When I go back to the books my brain fights between my Holden/Miller and the TV versions. I expect the TV versions will win out.

    I read “Handmaid” decades ago when it first came out, so I’m perfectly happy to imagine the TV actors if I reread it.

    I read “American Gods” every January (don’t ask) so it will be interesting to see what happens next time. The special effects for “Gods” were spectacular so I know they will overwrite my own imaginings.

    I’ve never read Stephen King’s novels so I would probably be fine imagining the movie actors if I do.

    I like making the effort to imagine everything for myself when I read a novel. TV and movies do everything for you and you miss out on that.

  2. The whole “the movie is not like I imagined the novel” thing is an interesting phenomena.

    Doesn’t seem to apply to plays as much, maybe because I have read many more plays than I have seen performed. You expect to see a play performed different times with different actors anyway. Also, a play being read fills in the environment very sparsely, if at all. A novel does much more setup outside of dialogue and character action, so that too may be not quite how you imagined it when you see the movie.

    What’s critical for me is which I did first. “The Expanse”, “American Gods”, and “The Handmaid’s Tale” are three recent examples.

    I read “Expanse” novels before the TV show. I imagined the characters of Holden and Miller quite differently from the TV show versions, but the actress they hired to do Naomi was exactly how I imagined her. When I go back to the books my brain fights between my Holden/Miller and the TV versions. I expect the TV versions will win out.

    I read “Handmaid” decades ago when it first came out, so I’m perfectly happy to imagine the TV actors if I reread it.

    I read “American Gods” every January (don’t ask) so it will be interesting to see what happens next time. The special effects for “Gods” were spectacular so I know they will overwrite my own imaginings.

    I’ve never read Stephen King’s novels so I would probably be fine imagining the movie actors if I do.

    I like making the effort to imagine everything for myself when I read a novel. TV and movies do everything for you and you miss out on that.

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